Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2answers
50 views

“be so kind to to sg” [closed]

I would like to ask somebody politely to accept an invitation. Which is the correct form "please be so kind to accept it" or "be so kind and accept it"
2
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1answer
56 views

“I want this so bad I'll do anything for it!”

When someone says this, we know he obviously doesn't mean he'll "do anything". In this case, what kind of statement is this? It isn't a literal statement too, right?
2
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3answers
139 views

Colorful English equivalent for the French expression “mine de capitaine”

Is there a colorful expression in English which equates to the French [avoir] une mine de capitaine? (Literally, to sport skipper's [glowing, healthy] looks) It is something that we say to someone ...
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1answer
73 views

What is the right way to say: “I like this author's writing style” [closed]

I am not a native English speaker and have a difficult time putting this idea into one sentence. I read one research paper and I really enjoy his writing style. How can I say that in one sentence? ...
0
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1answer
55 views

The word noggin [duplicate]

Where did the word "noggin" originate? My daughter was talking to her friend and the expression "your noggin" was used. Then one had asked the other, "where did that phrase come from originally?"
1
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3answers
59 views

Simple representation for “under the condition that”

I'm writing a academic paper, and would like to represent "under the condition that" more simply. In (very redundant) representation, what I'd like to say is: We determined the observation points ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Difference between “wants to be you” and “wants to become you”

I've been watching the latest season of House of Cards and in the latest episode I saw there is a line that I think is supposed to convey an image, but I can't quite understand it. It is about the US ...
1
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0answers
40 views

How to reformulate 'honor the data'

I have written sentence like this The resulting property models from cooperative inversion honor the geophysical data My Professor wants me to reformulate the sentence, in particular he raised a ...
7
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4answers
294 views

Is “Never mind” a phrasal verb?

When we say "never mind that" to mean disregard or don't worry about, is it a verb altogether (a phrasal verb) or is "mind" the verb that's modified by the adverb never? Examples: Never mind what he ...
1
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0answers
93 views

What is the meaning when someone say “it doesn't get much weird than Lynda?”

Lynda made a dance performance, it's very weird and many audiences couldn't understand it. Then a guy made a comment "It doesn't get much weird than Lynda?". What does he mean ? Is that "Lynda is ...
2
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1answer
57 views

Movement of fingers expressing shyness

What is name of the action for when your fingers "caress" one another because you're shy?
1
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1answer
36 views

Conjunction And to express one idea

Please take a look at this sentence: There is a philosophical question and an issue of humanity "what are aliens?". In this one, I want to express "philosophical question"(a) and "issue of ...
1
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0answers
46 views

“Set of the day” and “this is my line” [closed]

For those who watched Point Break , I fished out two idioms I haven't met before. The set of the day. Context: two guys are surfing, one of them points out a big wave and says: 'It is the set ...
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3answers
100 views

What is the significance of “single” in “single greatest” (or similar)?

People always say "The single greatest ...". But I think "The greatest ..." is also correct. Is the latter correct? If yes, what's the significance of adding "single"? By definition "greatest" is ...
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2answers
145 views

Is there a word to describe when someone has super-sensitive hearing?

What word or phrase could be used to accurately describe when someone has excellent or super-sensitive hearing far beyond that of most people, where they might have, for example: the ability to hear ...
6
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3answers
96 views

Why does “fair” mean “quite big”?

Fair is a word that suggests the idea of something right, proper, correct or reasonable, but in the following case it has a different connotation: Fair - (adjective): (before noun) ​quite ​...
0
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0answers
26 views

“The next thing we know” usage in warnings

I'm aware of that phrase "The next thing I(we) know" could be used to describe "blank periods in memory" or something that happends out of a sudden, for example: We all heard this weird noise, ...
0
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1answer
67 views

what is an Irish greeting to be said to someone in the evening?

Is there an alternative phrase for greeting someone in the evening a la Top of the morning to you?
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1answer
75 views

Can the verb “let” take an adjective as an object complement like to “leave”?

I was watching "Good Wife Season 7, Episode 16". Alicia was having a private time with her new boyfriend and her mother visited her daughter's house without prior notice. Alicia tried to hide him in ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Can I use “apply” in sense of “contact”?

It’s a classifieds app. Is it correct to use "brokers may apply"/"brokers may not apply" in sense of contacting? I mean does a broker apply when calling/emailing you to buy/rent your house, or is it ...
1
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2answers
45 views

Alternative to “Overreaching her mandate” for non-elected people

The way I see it, 'overreaching his mandate' is used when someone elected to a position or answering to someone else does things that are 'out of line' (negative connotation) for him. There is an ...
4
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1answer
136 views

History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
1
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0answers
64 views

History of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' [closed]

Anyone know the history of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' I imagine it comes from the wording 'Political Wonk' which I've heard of in the past but I'm not sure if it's a positive expression, neutral, ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the difference between “As per” and “As for”? [closed]

What is the difference between "As per" and "As for"? As for our professional services or as per our professional services?
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5answers
99 views

Looking for an English equivalent to the relatively new French word “bientraitance,” which means the act or practice of treating (someone/people) well [closed]

The French have coined a new term "bientraitance" which is a noun that means "treating people well" or "treating people respectfully or properly." I don't think there is an English equivalent (doesn't ...
18
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11answers
3k views

Are there any similar phrases that are popular in the US to express “penny dropped”?

I met the phrase penny dropped today and learned that it is mainly used in UK. The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary via TheFreeDictionary.com defines it as if you say the penny drops, you mean that ...
1
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1answer
109 views

What is the exact definition of the expression 'A Rat's Chance'? [closed]

I started to learn English. Watching series like popular 'The X-Files' etc is very useful. In the 6th episode of the 10th season I found the expression 'A rat's chance'. What does it mean?
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0answers
153 views

I need help with the usage of “as he would say”. Should there be a period after penny and should “T” be capital in “The day”? [closed]

Another significant person who played a major role in redefining the word perseverance was my instructor from Ducat. “Spend a single day without your parent’s financial support and try to earn ...
1
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1answer
74 views

Does “there's more to come” require a past tense after it? [closed]

I wrote the following phrase: There's more to come once this pull request get merged (a pull request is something that can be merged) I saw on various places people using There's more to come ...
0
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1answer
126 views

Is the expression “to get understood” correct?

Can I say Get yourself understood. with the sense of "make yourself understood"? Are both correct? Is there a difference in meaning between the two?
1
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2answers
176 views

How to tell someone (in a funny way) that you are aware that you are (too) emotive while talking about an issue?

How would you tell (briefly) the person you are talking with when you are flooded with emotions —in a funny way—, that: you are aware of these sign, and you find it embarrassing you don’t take your ...
0
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0answers
123 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
1
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3answers
94 views

forget or forget about?

Apart from the difference between forget it and forget about it, what do you forget and what do you forget about? Do you forget a face, someone's birthday or your date who is waiting for you? Do ...
3
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2answers
72 views

How to use “continued” at a bottom of a page?

I have several written papers, jumping from one topic to another, and I want to connect some of them by indicating that an argument will be deeply exposed elsewhere in the text. What I want to write ...
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0answers
40 views

Where does “for the same” come from? [closed]

I have noticed the expression "for the same" being used a lot by some people who speak English natively but are (possibly) from Nepal, Pakistan or maybe India. I have never heard this being used in ...
3
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1answer
51 views

Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
2
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2answers
61 views

Is there always a difference between 'is the' and 'is a'?

For instance, 'every dog owner is the friend of a dog owner' vs 'every dog owner is a friend of a dog owner'. For me, the former seems to imply that every dog owner is the friend of a particular dog ...
0
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1answer
104 views

“Have ever eaten” or “Ever ate”

I'd like to express that the steak I had (last Sunday) was the best one I have ever eaten. Is "Have ever eaten" correct or do I have to use the past simple "I ever ate", since the process (of eating) ...
17
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4answers
1k views

What is the origin of the idiom “To Stand Someone Up”?

I was curious as to if anyone knew of the origins of the idiom "to stand someone up" in the sense of: My date stood me up. Do you think he'll stand us up again? She stood me up last night. ...
1
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1answer
57 views

what does “showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle” literally means?

I saw this expression: "the aim of the activity is "to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle". " (It is connected with this other expression: "I don't know my way about".) I grasped the ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Australian English for items that are discounted, on sale, or on clearance?

US English user looking for help with AusE. How would you describe to a friend something you bought that was on sale, discounted, or on clearance? Would it be with those terms, or variations on those ...
1
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1answer
42 views

A word or a phrase for this logical fallacy [closed]

What is another word or phrase for when someone tries to dismiss an argument by simply claiming it is extreme, without offering any evidence or counterargument?
1
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2answers
53 views

How to express the fact that clauses in a compound logical statement are connected by “AND”?

Say, I have three independent logical clauses, a, b, and c, and they are connected into one logical statement (a∧b∧c). How do I express this succinctly? Can I say, "a, b, and c are connected ...
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1answer
70 views

meaning of “maybe she did see” [closed]

what is the difference between: maybe she did see and maybe she saw is it a grammatical usage of maybe?
0
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1answer
68 views

meaning of “As if I don't have enough to worry about”

As if I don't have enough to worry about without my youngest making up such things. I understand this meaning: without my children making problems, I have nothing to worry about. am I right?
1
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1answer
38 views

The middle of obscuring and appreciating positive psychology

I am examining characters who have ideologies or outlooks that lead or obscure appreciation of the attributes of positive psychology. Within the spectrum of both, what do you call the middle person ...
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2answers
116 views

“If, however in advance one has knowledge…” vs “However, if in advance one has knowledge…”

I am trying to write a paper and and I am not sure of the correct phrasing of a particular sentence. Here is what I am currently using If, however, in advance one has knowledge of the material ...
20
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4answers
4k views

Common expression for having a rich man's taste but a poor man's budget?

What is the common expression for having a rich person's taste and poor person's budget?
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3answers
100 views

Is it okay to say “Your explanation really solved my concerns" [closed]

Is it okay to say “You explanation really solved my concerns"? What are other ways to express this? Thank you!
5
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2answers
59 views

Why does the word “be” change so much?

In the phrase make <someone> {adjective}, it implies changing that person's emotion, but make <someone> be {adjective} implies forcing that person to comply. Why does the word "be", which ...