Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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11
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8answers
4k views

How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?

Perhaps I should make it clear: - He naturally attracts girls. - He doesn't chase girls and have no intention for any relationship. - You just see him often together with girls.
0
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1answer
36 views

At the beginning of “The hands of Mr. Ottermole” by Thomas Burke, an expression 'discolored themselves', which I can't simply understand

Murder (said old Quong)—oblige me by passing my pipe—murder is one of the simplest thing in the world to do. Killing a man is a much simpler matter than killing a duck. Not always so safe, perhaps, ...
0
votes
3answers
149 views

A more formal way of saying “pointing out”

The goal of an edge detection algorithm is identifying pixels that belong to an edge of an object in an image ... The rest of the sentence should say something along the lines of "and point ...
7
votes
2answers
418 views

What's the term for expressions like “man's man” or “lawyer's lawyer”?

To indicate an exemplar or someone well-respected within their own group or occupation, sometimes you see expressions like "man's man" or "lawyer's lawyer." Is there a name for this construction? ...
0
votes
2answers
169 views

Knocked up, two very different meanings. But why and how did the phrase split? [duplicate]

In American English, "Knocked up" means "pregnant." I just found out via an article regarding jobs that no longer exist that in British English, they use use the phrase "Knocked up in a completely ...
0
votes
1answer
182 views

Bora Bora, Here We Come

Saw this phrase/expression in CIBC advertisement. The pleased client asked, "should we re-investment or expand", and the bank clerk said, "you can do both", then the old lady in the back happily ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

What's a “brace” in the expression “brace yourself”? [closed]

I know the meaning of the expression, "brace yourself," and also the meaning of the word "brace" but I don't understand why they have that word in that expression and what its origin or history is. ...
0
votes
2answers
225 views

What does “Bunk over” mean?

Here ia a quote from The Avengers, 2012 film. Stark : The next building is gonna say "Potts" on the tower. Pepper : On the lease. Stark : Call your mom. Can you bunk over? Q. "The building is ...
2
votes
2answers
412 views

What does “it's all on you” mean?

I just wonder if "It is on you" can mean "It is because of you". This phrase is from Tony Stark in The Avengers, 2012 film. Common and natural saying in English-speaking countries?
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Is there a difference between “Wrong or Right” and “Right or Wrong”

I was writing about the difference between morals and ethics when i wrote the following line both these terms talk about the right and wrong conduct of people both these terms talk about the ...
3
votes
1answer
447 views

“what's in store” vs. “what's in stall”

I think this is probably just one of those phrases people get wrong, such as "for all extensive purposes" - but I just found this on a cafe web page: This question asks the meaning of "in store" ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

How to emphasize “I would rather”

I would like to emphasize the expression "I would rather... than ...". My native language is French, and in French we would say something like "I would rather 1000 times.... than", so I'm looking for ...
3
votes
1answer
210 views

It all started in Australia where the first real black swan was spotted

Definition of 'Black Swan' An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult to predict. This term was popularized by Nassim ...
2
votes
4answers
152 views

Why do the words ducky and jake mean fine or satisfactory?

Even the Merriam-Webster dictionary acknowledges both ducky and jake as acceptable terms meaning fine or satisfactory and it dates the word ducky back to 1897 and jake to 1914. Does anyone know how ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Meaning of 'All doubtless nourish the soul, but not all fatten the wallet'

I was going through an article on The Economist about returns of higher education and comparison of returns of various fields of study when I encoutered aforementioned phrase. It was quoted in the ...
-1
votes
5answers
175 views

What does “head first” mean?

There are a serial programming books whose names begin with head first such as Head First Design Patterns, Head First Java, etc. I'm not a native English speaker. What does head first mean here?
3
votes
5answers
103 views

Is this the opposite of 'making a virtue out of a necessity'?

We all know what it means to 'make a virtue out of a necessity'. The only bananas on offer at the supermarket are 'fair trade', so we buy them and then pretend to ourselves and others that we have ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Flattering vs. flatter [closed]

Of two sentences You are flattering me. You flatter me. Which is correct? Are both correct, or is one better than the other?
2
votes
2answers
94 views

Fickle people who agree just to annoy

During an argument one person capitulates, not because they agree, but just to irritate the other with phrases like: Yes, of course you are right etc. Is there a specific word to describe this ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

What is the meaning of “pet au pair”?

Granted, this looks french, I've seen this used and referenced in English. I see it used a lot with dog walking businesses or pet sitting companies, although I have no idea what it means. Google ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Is “that few” a correct expression?

We quite often hear the utterance "that many" as in I haven't had that many sweets! But is the opposite standard speech as well? Can one say: I don't have that few followers on Twitter! If ...
1
vote
2answers
18 views

term for the review of available technologies

I'm looking for a phrase analogous to "literature review", but referring to the review of technologies available to solve a particular problem. That is, what would I call the process of comparing the ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

What is correct: still to be/continue to be/should be/must be? [closed]

I want to build a sentence referring to the past, present and future: The Bible was, and continues to be, instrumental in spreading God's message to mankind. The Bible was, and should still be, ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Job interview question [closed]

I'm a French man in my late 20s and I'm applying for a job for a prestigious American company. I've had a job interview with an American woman and she told me all was well but I'd have to be molded to ...
0
votes
2answers
164 views

“In its entirety” vs “in entirety”

Where should "in its entirety" be used in place of "in entirety"? Consider the following paragraphs. Which usage is correct, and is the alternative incorrect / less correct, or simply not as common? ...
4
votes
3answers
92 views

What is the English word for a 'spaghetti harvest'?

Spaghetti, traditionally, an Italian crop is now being widely grown in Britain. Can anyone say what the harvest should be called, perhaps based on the Italian.
11
votes
5answers
3k views

An aeroplane, when it leaves the ground, 'takes off'. What does a bird do?

My daughter recently had the experience of a large bird hitting her car windscreen, and smashing it, when she was doing about 70mph on a motorway. Fortunately the bird did not come through the screen, ...
-1
votes
1answer
29 views

Use “scope” to refer to a book's sections

I would like to know whether it is correct or not to use the word "scope" to refer to a book's section, subsection or paragraph. For instance We will address these matters in the next scope.
6
votes
3answers
611 views

Is it ok to use 'before' at the end of a sentence?

I once had been told by my English teacher that before must be used with a special time or event, like: Say goodbye before you go. What about: I've seen that film before. Is this correct and ...
1
vote
4answers
142 views

Can you shorten this sentence?

Is there a shorter phrase with this meaning: I invited him to my party verbally when I met him. I thought perhaps the phrase I invited him personally meant this until I saw personal in written ...
19
votes
8answers
4k views

Alternative to “We'll just have to agree to disagree”

Is there a polite alternative to "We'll just have to agree to disagree" that can be used as an exit strategy from a relatively friendly debate when a person feels they've said all they have to say and ...
6
votes
7answers
505 views

Where does “my ass” come from?

The usage of my ass to mean me is now relatively common. My impression is that it originated from AAVE and has since been included in various other dialects. The NGram below implies it became popular ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

Term for using “thingy-esque” phrases rather than a common word

{This question came to mind because of the recent question .. What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English? } In my opinion, in English, it's reasonably common ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What's the difference between “have” and “have got” to express possession? [duplicate]

What's the difference between "have" and "have got" to express possession? examples: I have a pen. I have got a pen.
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

Enter the world [closed]

I am planning a big career change. In the emails to the people I want to ask for internship, I wrote "I strongly desire to pursue a career in AABBCC and currently looking for internship opportunities ...
0
votes
3answers
56 views

Catchall term for HTML, Javascript and CSS

A web server responds to requests [1] with three types of files [2]: HTML (the page structure), Javascript (the page code) and CSS (the page styles). Is there a single word or an expression that can ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

count of the number of times

I found this expression in a book. "This is a count of the number of times SomeDB had to follow an index pointer to the actual document on disk." It sounds weird to me but I am a non-native speaker. ...
1
vote
2answers
154 views

Difference Between “Plot” and “Storyline”

What is the difference in story writing between a "plot," and a "storyline"? Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th Edition) says a "story line" is "the plot of a story or drama," and Collin's ...
0
votes
3answers
93 views

Do “getting into…” and “getting interested in…” mean the same?

How did you get into it? How did you get interested in it? Do the examples above mean the same?
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How to call the scientists who work in the natural sciences?

How to call the scientists who work in the natural, technical, biological and other sciences? Can I call them natural scientists, technical scientists and so on?
0
votes
1answer
46 views

“a change in …” vs “a change to …”, any difference? [closed]

Is there any difference between "a change in something" and "a change to something"? Is that like the former one is a more objective description while the latter one emphasizes the result of a ...
-5
votes
6answers
173 views

he pregnate my daughter and he pregnated my daughter [closed]

i have being trying endlessly to think up something positive about this expression which of these is correct? He pregnate my daughter He pregnated my daughter
2
votes
4answers
102 views

Which of the two sentences is correct?

"What I feel more important is for you to go home right now." "What I feel is more important is for you to go home right now." Which sentence is correct? Also, is there a rule that is being followed ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

How to express the trend in this graph using the appropriate phrases?

I have this graph and I want to describe the difference in the take off trajectory of two patterns in the figure below. The first pattern is seen in the first two parameters over the years from the ...
2
votes
6answers
469 views

How can I describe it when you want to “sell” your personal image?

How can I describe when you want "sell" your image, sell how good you are at your job, for example? What phrase or idiom can I use for that? Here in Brazil (Portuguese) we have a metaphor like: "He ...
0
votes
3answers
90 views

What is the opposite of 'a false dawn'

What is the opposite of a false dawn, a false dawn being "a promising situation which comes to nothing". The sentence I'm thinking of would be something like: They started off well and it was not a ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Is it correct to say 'I gave off to students'

If you are a teacher and you cancel today's class, is it correct to say 'I gave off to students'?
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Has the meaning to the question “Do you mind” changed ?

When a person asks "Do you mind if I ..." The response now days seems to be "Yes ..sure go ahead" which to me means they DO mind.. I hear this constantly on TV and in the work place, it just seems ...
-1
votes
2answers
202 views

High level saying of the sentence “I don't just work for timepass”

Basically, I want to tell my superiors that whatever work I perform, I do it to the fullest and I do it efficiently. So I want to express the sentence: I dont work forcibly and for time pass. I ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

What is a non-secular and possibly offensive version of “for heaven's sake”? [closed]

In Is there a secular, non vulgar alternative to "for heaven's sake"? Terdon asks for something that is polite, secular, and non-offensive. I am asking for what is a non-secular phrase ...