Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2answers
57 views

Is it “the book that influences me most” or “the book that influences me the most”?

I'm not sure whether a "the" should be added before the "most" in this phrase. Or are they both OK but have different meaning?
1
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0answers
105 views

A word for saying exactly what you meant/wanted to

It seems to me that I've heard it before but it escapes me.. If I remember correctly the definition is relating to 'saying exactly the right thing at the right time' 'saying exactly what you meant ...
4
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2answers
89 views

I'm looking for a word that describes that moment you feel overwhelmed by the beauty and grandeur of nature

I was on a mountain the other day and had a moment where I just had to stop and take it all in. I felt insignificant (in the best way) and just stopped to admire where I was. The closest words I could ...
0
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0answers
61 views

“in a * perspective” or “from a * perspective”

Which is correct: "in a * perspective" or "from a * perspective"? So for example "Growing cucumber in a mathematical perspective" or "Growing cucumber from a mathematical perspective". Thanks, ...
8
votes
1answer
236 views

Etymology of the “half your age, plus seven” phrase? [closed]

Stories vary online about the origins of this. It comes up in French in the early 20th century, and apparently American newspapers in 1931. What are the earliest known examples in the English ...
0
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1answer
76 views

Is it a native way to say “I misremembered the time for the appointment”?

Is it a native way to say "I misremembered the time for the appointment"? Is therer any alternative way to express this meaning? Thank you!
1
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2answers
52 views

“In a very simple fashion”

I don't know where I've heard such expression. I try to explain (for sales) what our software tool does and I use this sentence: "It helps you to deploy apps in a very simple fashion". And then I ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Term to describe such conversational phrases [closed]

Is there a term to describe colloquial, chatty phrases such as: Weird, I know. Who knew there was a place called Pikachu. You may be wondering... I'm doing a written assignment and I have to ...
4
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5answers
86 views

Don't bring a knife to a gunfight

I need a "softer" analogy that means the same thing as "Don't bring a knife to a gunfight" or "It's like bringing a knife to a gunfight".
4
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3answers
123 views

The meaning of the idiom “pin one's hat on something”

HINOJOSA: And how they got there is the reason why the Kohn family is now part of a national scientific study to locate a gene for longevity. DR. TOM PERLS, CENTAGENETIX: We started off ...
1
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2answers
45 views

When everything is blinking, what’s still will be shown. What does this expression mean?

What does this expression mean? In a world of clutter, simplicity rules the throne. When everything is blinking, what’s still will be shown. ("Zen and the Art of Email Design," by Cameron ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Is “good for you” a sarcastic usage most of time? [closed]

I would like to know what "good for you" mean at most of time. After my own research, I knwe that it could mean "congratulations" and alternatively "would like an award" when speaking sacracsticlly. I ...
1
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2answers
32 views

Term/expression to describe a user's license (account) is allowed to be used?

I have a software that manages user accounts at a given service. The administrator creates the account, the user validates e-mail and other data and then the account is considered to be valid/good ...
2
votes
4answers
378 views

What do you call someone who solves puzzles?

What is a term or name for someone who is very adept at solving puzzles or situations that require though processing and logic. I ran across this question, however this only deals with crossword ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Word for the concept of a perfect fit [closed]

Is there any word to define the concept of something that fits perfectly? Like the expression "Fits like a glove" but shorter. The usage will be as an adjective to describe how well a outfit fits a ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Term for a storyline that splits in two

Is there a term for a storyline that splits into two points of view? For example, two characters who travel together split paths and plot unfolds in two different timelines. It can probably be applied ...
-1
votes
2answers
63 views

What does “I feel friendly” mean?

If I want to express the feeling that other people are very friendly to me, what is the proper way to say it? Is it okay to say:"I feel you are very friendly"? Is there any better way to say so? ...
1
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6answers
222 views

Men sweat, but women glisten. What's the equivalent for a woman for snoring?

Colloquially, we say that men sweat, but women glisten. Is there an equivalent word for describing when women snore?
0
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1answer
63 views

Why do people use the term "free gift'?

I see and hear the term "Free Gift". Are not all gifts free?
1
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1answer
25 views

Proper word for “all type of rooms / accommodations”?

I'm working on this app and right now it has a common taxonomy called "hotel". However, this app can work with hotels, chains of hotels, apartments, rooms, cabins, guesthouses and anything you could ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Which is better, no good at sports or not good at sports?

Which of the following sounds more natural to native ears? 1. I'm not good at sports. 2. I'm no good at sports. Is there any difference in the meaning?
6
votes
7answers
420 views

Expression for internal struggle

In German language, there is the beautiful expression "seinen inneren Schweinehund überwinden", which amounts to "to overcome one's inner pig-dog", and vividly describes the feeling of surpassing the ...
1
vote
1answer
147 views

Where does “the sky is falling” come from?

According to Wikipedia the common expression "the sky is falling" is from a folk tale: Henny Penny, more commonly known in the United States as "Chicken Little" and sometimes as "Chicken ...
2
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2answers
142 views

What does “Take care sweets” mean?

A good friend wrote me an email and at the end she added Take care sweets. I guess it's something good, but not sure what is the exact meaning. I searched a little bit what does that mean and didn't ...
1
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3answers
51 views

“accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”

I am arguing with my colleague about what phrase is easier to understand, i.e. "accounts for up to" vs "is gained from". My wording is the following: Sometimes this sector accounts for up to 70% ...
1
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1answer
102 views

What is the source for “My back foot!”

Does anyone know where the phrase "My back foot!", used as an expression of disbelief comes from? The seemingly, obvious source would be a reference to being on the defensive as to the truthfulness of ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [closed]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
0
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1answer
102 views

where does the phrase “all of a 2 'n 8” originate from?

where does the phrase "all of a 2 'n 8" originate from? It means - not knowing what to do - confused - unsettled
10
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5answers
272 views

The “wrought /wreaked havoc” misunderstanding

According to the American Heritage Dictionary: the past tense and past participle of the verb to wreak is wreaked, not wrought, which is an alternative past tense and past participle of work. ...
1
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2answers
48 views

English (UK) - does “an enraged expression” make sense?

I am writing a book and one of my characters is angry but I feel like angry doesn't fit in and that enraged makes more sense and also makes the language of the book better but I'm not sure if it makes ...
1
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2answers
105 views

A powerful idiom for “low exposure” [closed]

Imagine someone creates a piece of art, but nobody notices it. Like a great book, which nobody reads because nobody knows that it exists. What are some powerful words or metaphors for this condition? ...
5
votes
1answer
186 views

Is there a word for when you run into someone and both of you try to avoid each other and fail, repeatedly? [duplicate]

It has most certainly happened to all of us at least once: Two people walking along the same narrow pathway in opposite directions walk into each other. There is room for both to pass each other, ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

What words can express the act of sharing in a collective sense, as opposed to a distributive sense

I would like words or very concise statements that express the act of working together and sharing items/resources to a common location for the benefit of a group of people that the items are being ...
3
votes
1answer
139 views

What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?

A worst-case scenario is a cliché that refers to: the worse possible future outcome. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms) Though the meaning is quite intuitive, the ...
1
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2answers
51 views

Term for choosing by not choosing [duplicate]

Is there a term for rejecting a proposal by not actively endorsing/confirming/voting for it? Like a veto, but by abstention, rather than active participation. Alternatively, a term for "A choice ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Set X to v? or Set X as v?

I'm writing an academic paper, and would like to say that the value of X is v using imperative form. (Specifically in the algorithm section. That's why I need to use imperative.) Which among the ...
0
votes
3answers
100 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Is it “visit at the doctor” or “visit at the doctor's”? What's the difference? [duplicate]

Are both expressions OK? Why/ why not? Why do we say "at the doctor's"?
2
votes
1answer
73 views

What does “crack around the door” mean?

Can I use "crack around the door" in the following situation? If I am wrong, could you give me the correct expression? Thank you. The door of Dad's room was half-open. Through the crack around the ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Noun clause for complement

I'd like to say following facts as short as possible. We conducted a experiment. The purpose of the experiment is testing a hypothesis The hypothesis is that all of beatle in this island is black ...
0
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0answers
54 views

“The last of the late brakers”

This is a common phrase in motorsports, particularly with motorcycles. Carrying speed for as long as possible, and braking as late and hard as possible into a turn, is advantages to lower overall ...
5
votes
5answers
109 views

What's the more common way to refer to a road with 180° curves?

A hairpin road is a road with hairpin turns or bends. According to Wikipedia: A hairpin bend , named for its resemblance to a hairpin/bobby pin, is a bend in a road with a very acute ...
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

A word for this kind of intimate action [duplicate]

When somebody touches you in some sensitive areas of your body, like armpits, "it will make you laugh in some kind of way". When you want to tell somebody that you are not going to touch them in that ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Safety First or Safety's first? [closed]

Is Expression "Safety First" grammatically correct, or " Safety's first"? Also,There is a website called TED "ideas worth spreading".. I think it should be ideas are worth spreading because worth ...
0
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0answers
49 views

A word to describe interest in a process related to a certain situation but not in the situation itself

The word to describe a person's interest in a process related to a certain situation but does not necessarily convey their interest in the situation itself. To provide context: Over the last 4 years ...
3
votes
3answers
129 views

What does plaster in “plaster saint” refer to?

The saying plaster saint is used to refer to: A person who makes a show of being without moral faults or human weakness, especially in a hypocritical way. (ODO) The expression is ...
2
votes
4answers
86 views

Contractors becoming part of company they are working for

What's the term when a contractor (or other person) who is technically employed by company A but works so much/closely with company B, that they feel more loyal to company B or assimilate better with ...
0
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0answers
54 views

“Should it go through the formality of actually happening …”

When did phrases such as go through the formality of taking place and its logical equivalents (such as going through or experiencing the formality of actually happening or existing or ...
29
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16answers
3k views

Is there any equivalent to this Persian proverb? “A bad or faulty item should inevitably be kept by its owner”

We use a proverb that implies "A bad property (i.e., a thing belonging to someone) or item should inevitably be tolerated/kept by its owner" when we want to say "This bad item won't be accepted by ...
0
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2answers
224 views

The phrase “the reason has to be because XXX” [duplicate]

Husband asked, "Do you think it's true that men use 15,000 words a day and women use double?" The wife replied, "I think so, The reason has to be because we have to repeat everything to ...