Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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4answers
145 views

Using “mentioned above” when speaking

Is it valid to say "mentioned above" when one reference to something one have previously said? Context example (transcript from The Law of One): Questioner: George Van Tassel built a machine in ...
1
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6answers
90 views

What's a good word for 'A short review'?

This would be a topic in a progress report that would outline what the project is about without going into details. I'm looking for something that means like 'Refresher' but sounds more professional.
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1answer
72 views

Meme expression synonyms / explanation

Could someone please disambiguate / deconstruct all the nuanced meanings of the following types of expressions originating in internet meme culture. At some point it becomes obvious there's more than ...
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1answer
72 views

What is Nerd Test all about? [closed]

Not sure, where to ask this. I did it here, and it was put in Hold , finally attempting here as a last try!! I am really curious(!) to know what is this? I got this link randomly about how nerd are ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Noun for “the version that I handed in”

At university, we get problem sets, I work on them and hand them in. Then a tutor corrects them and gives them back to me. On my website, I want to provide both (since the former is digital, the ...
2
votes
2answers
464 views

“Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?

I just came across something I'd written a while ago that contained the phrase "follows close behind", and my first thought was that it was incorrect and should be "follows closely behind", i.e. to ...
25
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8answers
5k views

Is there a polite way of saying “people like you”?

It seems that "people like you" is almost always used as an insult (similar to "your kind"). e.g. A shop owner might say to an annoying customer that doesn't buy anything, "Go away, I don't have time ...
0
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1answer
120 views

Does the phrase 'Harsh, but fair' actually make sense? [closed]

Very often I hear the phrase 'harsh but fair' used to describe something that is unduly severe, but ultimately just. I don't think that it even makes sense, though - and although I've tried to discuss ...
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2answers
113 views

A proper closing expression for informal email

What is an expression that you can use at the end of an informal email, when you forgot something and want to add it to the email after your signature?
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2answers
2k views

Wish someone 'good luck' for an operation

What is a good way of wishing someone 'good luck' for an operation? The words 'good luck' don't sound right, especially because it is a very difficult operation with lots of severe risks.
2
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1answer
51 views

Words for “everyday details” that illustrate life

When talking about things used in a performance to illustrate conditions of life (like jam-jars and baskets to show village life), can I call them everyday details?
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1answer
155 views

What's a better way of saying “rarely used”

I'm writing an article about using rarely used English words and how to learn and use them. As an example I'd like to find an alternate way of saying "rarely used" I believe there should be one word ...
13
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8answers
3k views

What to call someone who always sincerely shows on the outside how and what he feels on the inside?

So, this person is very open, honest and brave to display his vulnerabilities and feelings (because that's what feels natural for him, and as a good thing, to do) whether he's out in public, with ...
2
votes
4answers
104 views

How you do you say “What is this word?” in a friendly, indirect and elaborate way?

In French, when you don't know what the hell a word means that's just been mentioned, instead of flat-out asking “What is that?” we have an informal expression “Hmmm, ça se mange?” (Litterally, “can ...
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1answer
63 views

Open the rivers of Heaven?

I've heard someone saying "Their task in worship is to open the rivers of Heaven", and I understand that it means something like "Their task is to make worship extremely beautiful", but is there a ...
1
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2answers
55 views

You heard me! (expression)

What's some alternatives of saying "You heard me" while snapping back at someone (in informal and formal situations both) ? Can I say "You heard it"? Also in a formal setting when dealing with jerks ...
19
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2answers
2k views

Answering a question with another question when the answer is obviously 'Yes'

I heard it in the TV Series Fargo, Episode 9. Here is the transcript: A: We still on for golf next week? B: Course we are, Burty Burt. A: But more importantly, are you and Louise still gonna ...
0
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1answer
40 views

degrees of temperature and humidity [closed]

I am currently working on a game where the different areas of the map will have different climates. I wish to have 5 different levels of temperature and humidity for the different climates. I ...
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1answer
34 views

Relationship Literary Term

What is it called in text when a character refers to someone as "son of_____" or "descendant of_____". Like when they refer to a person as the relation to someone else
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1answer
50 views

Shall I put the adjective behind the noun in this case?

"Function" means the performance of something, so it is on a level different from "project".(self-made) Here what I mean is that the two words are on different levels, the first may refer to ...
4
votes
1answer
131 views

What does “Gay as Dad's old hatband” refer to?

I have seen the phrase "Gay as Dad's old hatband" more than once in twentieth century American fiction. I think it is playing on the double meaning of gay, but what is the happy (bright colored?) ...
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1answer
68 views

How to use “should” to express surprise and expectation respectively?

The value should be zero can be read as two totally different meanings: The value is zero, and we have expected that it would be zero. The value is zero. But we have never expected that it would be ...
0
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1answer
51 views

What is the meaning of the word “along” in this context?

I am a bit confused with the usage of the word "along" in a sentence from some lecture slides "check if X lies on the path along existing neighbors" Does this mean that X is structured in this form: ...
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1answer
75 views

Gold or golden nugget?

I can't figure it out. I've seen both been used, but a nugget is presumably gold, or can golden be used as well?
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2answers
60 views

Expression/word combination for “object of application”

I need to be able to refer to an object which has/needs something applied to it or used on it. A couple of examples: one liter of paint is needed to paint an area of 10m². 6 birthday candles are ...
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3answers
187 views

Meaning of “for the day” [closed]

I Google'd "for the day" but it seems that it is not precisely an idiom. Does it mean during day time or for a whole day? Here is the sentence where I found that expression: Now I could take a ...
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2answers
221 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
2
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2answers
202 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
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4answers
45 views

About “the level of perception”

If we talk about a performance that does not reconstruct historical background but is supposed to appeal to our feelings omitting all formal evidences, can we use the expression on the level of ...
1
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1answer
215 views

What is the difference between “here goes” and “here it goes”?

I’m wondering what the difference between here goes and here it goes is. When something is going down and I want to express my feeling of “I’ll make it!”, which expression is correct? For example, ...
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1answer
55 views

Why do we use “executed” in referral to carrying something out? [closed]

The wording, given the standard meaning of "executed" - which is often in a negative light, as per the term - seems strange. Has the term been adopted into it's current (stated) usage or has it always ...
0
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1answer
106 views

Does it make sense to use “They're welcome” as a response to “X says thanks”?

I've seen someone respond with "They're welcome" to "X says thanks" where X is another person and/or group of persons. The reply seemed okay to me, but its correctness has been immediately contested ...
0
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3answers
69 views

Is “Well-spokenness” a phrase in current use ?

I had never heard or read this before, but a job ad required "well-spokenness". The American Heritage Dictionary never even mentions "spokenness". Nor does the OED online. Although I think I ...
2
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2answers
84 views

Is the usage of “ma'am” in the Philippines correct?

In the Philippines, they use the honorific ma'am before a name, such as Ma'am Garcia or Ma'am Karen. I think this is incorrect use of the word ma'am, but I was told it is acceptable. Is this usage ...
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1answer
47 views

Usage of the expression unfold against

Can I use the expression unfold against talking about some literature/movie/theatre actions. For example, The plot of this performance unfolds against historical background?
2
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2answers
55 views

Gill or Branchia

I am writing a dialog and I need to mention Gills (or Branchias), the respiratory organ of animals like fish. I was wondering which one would be more common or casual in English speech (say, in the ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Meaning of “kick out the last jam of the set”

I can't clearly get this phrase. Is it related to the "kick out the jams"? Or "jam" means the song/jazz improvisation, so what does "kick out" mean in that case? The context is "they are kicking out ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Another (perhaps humorous) term for “The Gold Standard”

Gold Standard as in: an example against which others of the same type are compared - http://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/gold%20standard Any other humorous ways to refer to this? ...
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1answer
143 views

is “if any” the same as “if existing”?

Given this sentence: Its original manufacturer’s warranty, if any, still applies, with warranty details included in the item details. Can I change “if any” in the above sentence to “if ...
4
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7answers
2k views

Please “Mute your voice”!

I have not heard or used this phrase before, but can I use the sentence "please mute your voice" in conversation?
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1answer
105 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
0
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4answers
102 views

The “Oh to have…” expression [closed]

What does "Oh to have..." mean, as in "Oh to have a song in a national campaign" in Jon Lajoie's song "Please Use This Song"? Can somebody explain the origin and meaning of this expression? In what ...
1
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4answers
142 views

What is the meaning of “poetry” ? And how far it is different from “Poem”? [closed]

In a concert I heard saying Poetry is : "words carrying the meaning little concealed and little exposed." It may sound convincing but thats not word to word meaning neither complete. It is just a ...
6
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2answers
165 views

Where did the phrase “washing one's hands of” originate?

I know that the phrase "to wash one's hands of" comes from Pilate in the Bible, Matthew 27:24: When Pilate saw that he was getting nowhere, but that instead an uproar was starting, he took water ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

What does ranked two places below mean?

If a statement says "India is ranked two places below China" What place does India hold if China is ranked 1? Is it rank 3 or 4? Also, is there any difference between the following two sentences? ...
4
votes
2answers
40 views

Name for the cognitive bias of seeming to not need something when you have it, but needing it when you don't?

An example of what I'm talking about is buying a snow blower because the past few winters have been very snowy, only to find that the next several winters after buying have hardly any snow, i.e. "it ...
2
votes
9answers
1k views

Is there a word for people who always act too friendly in order to curry favor with their acquaintances?

Is there a single noun or adjective for a person who is always flattering friends and acquaintances, not only to be liked and accepted but, at other times, to curry favor with them as well ? I'm not ...
1
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2answers
73 views

Is there a way to praise the action rather than the intelligence or strength?

Considering: http://parenting.stackexchange.com/a/11556/2221 Kids who are constantly told, "You are so beautiful" can actually become overly worried when their looks change and become overly ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Derivation of the phrase “what the dickens”?

What is the derivation of "what the dickens"? It features in the Merry Wives of Windsor "I cannot tell what the dickens his name is." So the meaning doesn't seem to have changed ie synonymous with ...
1
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0answers
269 views

English does not have a future tense--what do you think? [closed]

Some say English does not have a future tense. In fact, wikipedia describes it as follows. English grammar provides a number of ways to indicate the future nature of an occurrence. Some argue that ...