Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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1answer
24 views

How to describe lists with different ordering schemes?

I'm helping someone copy a list of lines a certain number of times into a new list, and I don't know how to describe the list that we're creating. For example, let's copy a list composed of 1, 2, and ...
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3answers
97 views

What is the word for trying to do someone else's job, to get them fired eventually?

I have been searching a lot for this, but can't find the expression. I'm wondering if there is a phrase that is used a lot for this. At work, it happens a lot in many organizations that people try to ...
0
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2answers
45 views

How to describe a request that I'd prefer to avoid

Hello dear linguistics, I am looking for a short phrase, a word if you may, that will describe the following: A request that I can fulfill but I am reluctant to as it involves some actions that I ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Is it correct to use “All season product” to indicate a product can be used in every season of the year?

Assuming an hypothetical product, would it be correct to use an description such as "Thermo-adaptable 500 thread all season linen" to describe it? A small sentence indicating that the product was ...
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2answers
46 views

Expression of “no sooner … than” [closed]

From the SAT: No sooner had Andrea del Sarto traveled to France to work for the French king than his wife persuaded him to return to Italy. I am not sure what no sooner ... than means. Does it ...
0
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1answer
115 views

Is the idiom “as neat as a pin” an American phrase?

I'm editing a novel set in 1930s England, written by an American author, and have been editing out any Americanisms I come across. I just read a line of dialogue containing the idiom "as neat as a ...
2
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1answer
49 views

“I know right” what can I use instead of that phrase

I am a 50 year old woman but I work with a lot of younger women. In conversations I use, "I know, right?", so often now that they make fun of me.
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2answers
58 views

proper way to ask for permission to change TV channels [closed]

If you want to change your TV channel to another one, would you say, "Can I change the channel?" or "Can I change channels?" or anything else?
2
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3answers
215 views

Another way to say “to become a better person”

When I'm asked the generic question, "why do you do community service?" I usually respond by saying "because it makes me a better person," or "because doing community service allows me to develop ...
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1answer
44 views

How can “to have no illusions that something will happen” mean to be convinced/aware that something will happen?

I read the following sentence in a book: The U.S basketball team have no illusions that they can beat Lithuania. Given that the U.S would have been red hot favourites for this game I found this ...
39
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19answers
6k views

Phrase to describe a moving goal that is forever just out of reach

Ironically, the phrase I am trying to recall is just out of reach, so perhaps someone can help me with a phrase that describes a moving goal that is forever just out of reach. I will try to provide ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Phrase for “representative of my day”

I'm looking for a phrase similar to "representative". It may be a single word as well. I've been trying to think of it for days... Example: A person is having the worst day at work. They get home and ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Is “during the middle of” proper English?

In this question on the Movies & TV Stack Exchange the question starts with the following observation: Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who portrayed a character in The Hunger Games, passed ...
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2answers
127 views

“Why, when, how and where” are not interrogative pronouns. Why? [closed]

I have the following question: What, who, which, whom and whose are interrogative pronouns, but why, when, how and where are not. Why? Please answer this question briefly. Thank you.
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1answer
130 views

How old is the expression “to travel by [means of transportation]”?

A friend of Mari-Lou's has told her that in the old days, people traveled "on foot" or "on horseback," and the preposition "by" only entered the fray with the advent of trains and cars ("How are you ...
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1answer
106 views

Which is correct? log in, log on, log into, log onto [duplicate]

I've seen different questions related to the same verb, but those questions implicate an imperative form (For example when you tell somebody to log in/on) which I think may vary the condition in which ...
2
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0answers
75 views

Can “keep up the good work” be used for praising a co-worker? [closed]

Is "keep up the good work" a polite thing to say to your co-workers? I'm under impression that only someone from higher position has the privilege to say this. When replying the emails to a ...
0
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2answers
47 views

Term for restricted books in public lending library

Until a few decades ago many public lending libraries carried certain books which were not made available to the general public -- erotica and controversial political tracts, for example. In a Dutch ...
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0answers
16 views

how to know when the independent clause starts

my question is about the usage of the independent clause, and it is also about how to know when the dependent clause starts. Also, in the below given sentence, is the comma used before now correct or ...
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1answer
54 views

Is the “beauty of design” a good phrase?

I was writing some words in my portfolio website. But I felt confused about this. In the time when I was coding my website, I've made several UI things. However, only after I entering this field, ...
2
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2answers
143 views

Is the expression “in seek of” acceptable?

Is this sentence correct, or are there better ways to express it: In seek of an ideal start for my career, I am applying for the PhD program at your school. Am I using the wrong verb here, ...
2
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3answers
85 views

Expression to describe the curse of being at higher positions in a workplace

Rising up the corporate ladder is good, it comes with increased salary, reputation and other good things but there are also certain curses associated with such a change. For one thing, your friends ...
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14answers
1k views

Is there a word/phrase to describe an action which leads to it being pointless?

I'm wondering if there's a word or phrase to describe an action or activity which turns out to be pointless - let me explain further with an example; Recently I was organising the garage and had lots ...
3
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2answers
81 views

How can I describe how profoundly I was affected?

I recently survived two brain surgeries (the first needed to be reopened after complications) on Sept 21 and Oct 9. I had a month to get things in order, raise money, coordinate my husband and son ...
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2answers
41 views

Is it redundant to say “the jury is still out”?

Should somebody who seeks to avoid stylistic infelicities related to redundancy refrain from using "still" in the construction "the jury is [] out"?
3
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1answer
142 views

What is the origin of the phrase “What, me worry”? (It isn't Mad Magazine!)

In Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania, Erik Larson discusses the early history of the submarine. According to Larson, the submarine was regarded as an "iron coffin" until the work of John ...
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3answers
79 views

Stop chewing! What is it called when someone doesn't like the sound of other people eating?

My brother hates the sound of eating, chewing, slurping, swallowing etc. I am looking for either: The name of the condition or A word to describe the type of person who behaves like this
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0answers
38 views

Calling this kind of situation of defeat

I am looking for a phrase to describe a situation where two people are arguing and only one of them is good with words (Let's call him 'A') and the one with limited speaking skills (let's call him ...
2
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2answers
51 views

Using “Cheesy tactics” to win

I'm a huge fan on HoMaM4 and I'm watching a videos on youtube, posted from the other players, walking through the campaigns. The goal for me is to have fun, learn new strategies, gain new moves ...
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2answers
68 views

What is the equivalent of this Arabic expression?

In Arabic, when someone tells you "You look good today," or "Thank you for the flowers, they are beautiful," the polite answer is: It is not the flowers. Your eyes are so beautiful everything appears ...
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5answers
145 views

“Breathe a kiss”

I'm wondering if there's an (or more?) English expressions for the type of kiss where your lips barely touch the "kissed". It is a very gentle act, and it often occurs in highly emotional situations, ...
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1answer
82 views

Suck it up and be a man [duplicate]

I came across this expression today and found that the term means to endure the hardship phase a man is going through without whining which is what is stereo typically expected from a guy. I went ...
0
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1answer
55 views

What is the meaning of “blend in”? [closed]

What is the meaning of "blend in" according to the context of the following sentence? Now, I just want to do something stupid and mindless, you know? Where I can just like totally blend in. Thank ...
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2answers
111 views

Meaning of “Object” in the expression “If money were no object.”

The expression "If money were no object" is in fairly wide use. I've always interpreted the word "object" as "material" (so, "if money were immaterial") or "objection" (so, "if [lack of] money were ...
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2answers
81 views

“To follow one's bent” - meaning [closed]

Recently, I came across the expression "To follow one's bent," but I cannot find anything on the internet that explains what it means. Could someone shed some light on this expression, please?
3
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1answer
188 views

“each of us” vs “both of us”

A guy said that he will give them 20 bucks if they wash his car. So they asked him that question to make it clear. But I am confused by their reply: Is that 20 bucks for each of us or both of us? ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Isn't the expression “patently obvious” a tautology?

"Patently" in this context is synonymous with "obvious" so this essentially translates to "obviously obvious". I've heard this particular turn of phrase crop up fairly often - ironically often in ...
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3answers
41 views

Is there a word to decsribe what appears to be social ignorance?

I am trying to come up with a way to describe a person that denies they have a problem due to the large number of people in society that follow the same beliefs. Very confusing.. stay with me here. ...
3
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3answers
57 views

Succinct expression for “an offer you can't refuse”

Supposing someone is currently employed and just isn't a fit on the team and management offers him a generous severance if he resigns immediately, otherwise if he refuses to resign immediately it is ...
3
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4answers
50 views

Expression for over-specified, and wrong, solution

Is there a word or term defined as: the wrong solution due to being overly specified? This can happen when someone less knowledgable in a field suggests a specific solution to an expert, when ...
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2answers
75 views

What is the meaning of “I believe you're up”?

My question is very simple. I just would like to know what do they mean by: "I believe you're up" I've heard this expression in a movie and here is the script: I already met your dad. He loves me. ...
4
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1answer
127 views

How do I ask a waitress to “wrap the rest of the food up” to bring home?

I went to a restaurant for a meal and didn't manage to finish it, so there was some food leftover. How do you politely ask a server/waiter/waitress to wrap the food up? And is the expression "wrap ...
2
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3answers
110 views

When did the “sales pitch” start?

Sales pitch refers to: (Commerce) an argument or other persuasion used in selling. promotion by means of an argument and demonstration. (Collins Dictionary) Accordino to Etymonline ...
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2answers
51 views

usage of “Pack” : pack elements into containers or pack containers into elements

I came across a passage: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/7946668/Short-breaks-make-people-happier-than-one-long-holiday-psychologists-claim.html In the last paragraph, the author, who I ...
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2answers
72 views

Meaning of phrase

What is meant by the phrase "Given x months to live" ? It is invariably followed by something along the lines of " But he proved the doctors wrong and lived another 25 years." There must be a lot of ...
2
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3answers
231 views

Looking for an idiom opposite to “the more the merrier”

I am looking for an idiom or a phrase that expresses the opposite idea of "the more the merrier". Context: Five persons are taking a class in gymnastics with a private coach. Only two show up ...
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6answers
1k views

Usage of “Proud words from a weak stomach”

In the Hindi language there is an equivalent phrase which is widely used when a common man who is trying to suggest an idea to a person in power or some higher authority respectfully without ...
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5answers
401 views

Describe a person who brags about difficulties

I am looking for a commonly used phrase, idiom, or simile that describes people who like to talk (brag?) about their difficulties, especially self inflicted or easily avoidable ones, as if having ...
6
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3answers
509 views

Is the phrase “make waves” used with the sense “create a snowball effect”?

I was writing a post for my company's blog talking about Open source, and wanted to wrap it up with Let's make waves. I was pretty sure that the expression meant something like Let's replicate this, ...
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2answers
73 views

what does “to which it is a party” mean in this setence?

I have a statement here and I dont get the meaning exactly "Each of the Members agrees to make an annual report to the International Labour Office on the measures which it has taken to give effect to ...