Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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Is there a word for words with specific meaning? [duplicate]

A word that group words that give the impression "There is a word for that!" and "Mot juste" is what I inquire. I can't find any term for it, and my search of the list only leads to a website like ...
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6answers
298 views

English equivalent of two popular Chinese slangs: 学霸 (academic overlord) and 学婊 (academic bitch)

In popular Chinese language, especially in Internet Chinese language, we use the word "学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who ...
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71 views

What does “I called him mine” mean? [closed]

In a popular song, "My Baby Shot Me Down", the text contains this expression: When I grew up I called him mine What does it mean?
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2answers
91 views

Is there a name for this type of sentence: “The higher the temperature, the higher the pressure”? [duplicate]

Is there a name for this type of sentence: "The higher the temperature, the higher the pressure"? Such a word grouping is generally accepted as a sentence in science.
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4answers
94 views

A better way to say “too busy to become more productive”?

I am looking for a clear way to describe a situation in which someone is genuinely interested in becoming more skilled, but is so overburdened with obligations that they have no time to learn how to ...
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1answer
370 views

meaning of “I'm so in my head” [closed]

Does the phrase "I'm so in my head", that I have heard in multiple songs, have a special meaning?
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2answers
59 views

What is specific usage of “to be of service”? [closed]

Can you let me know specific usage of that expression?
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1answer
97 views

Expression for “a place where you could settle and live without having to ask for permission, pay taxes, …” [closed]

On the History Stack Exchange they were talking about “white spots”. Is there a proper expression, a single word, or a phrase for such a place? By "white spot" I mean a place where you (if you ...
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2answers
127 views

How to express this feeling?

I am looking for a phrase to express a feeling. Here it is. A song was out in the market a couple of years ago and it was a huge hit at that time. Today, I heard that song which reminded me all ...
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Are there good English expressions for “raison d’être” and “joie de vivre”? [closed]

I know the two phrases have been adopted into the English lexicon, but raison d’être and joie de vivre are phrases, not words. As phrases they certainly sound better in French than would their ...
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46 views

Repeated phrases such as 'four times it stopped on the very threshold of the gate, four times the armour clanged' [duplicate]

I was wondering if there is a phrase or word for this language technique. Virgil, and other classical poets use it quite a lot. For example 'three times she lifted herself on her elbow. Three ...
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60 views

What to do now- Is the statement incorrect

A novice to this "learning forum". I was working on sth that was a solution to a SQL query and it did not work out. So I uttered- What to do now. My manager, who is from Italy and whose ...
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“Take something as read” - very old meaning of read?

Take (something) as read is described as an idiomatic expression. But I am wondering if read has its original meaning of advise, interpret here? Is there any etymological evidence for how this ...
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“Calling a spade a spade”: synonymous expressions?

I'm looking for expressions that are equivalent to "calling a spade a spade." In some environments and verbal contexts, this phrase needs to be avoided -- please take my word for it. Thank ...
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1answer
76 views

What is the origin and meaning of “Save some for Jehoshaphat”?

Back in the late 1950's, during Sunday dinner (here in Tennessee), my mom would often exclaim "save some for Jehoshaphat". What is the origin and meaning of that phrase?
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2answers
56 views

little thud, thud, tap, tap

What do you mean or express by this expression Sometimes you'll get a little thud, thud, tap, tap I tried to translate "..thud, thud, tap, tap" and failed!
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3answers
95 views

Feminine version of colloquial use 'hi man'

When a man greets another man, he often says 'hi man', 'thanks man', etc. I am wondering whether these expressions have feminine use. I never heard a woman greeting another woman with 'hi woman'. Any ...
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1answer
37 views

Correct punctuation to accompany 'I' and 'we' in this example?

I am writing a poem and I want to know how to punctuate this line in relation to people's individual motives and not doing anything with a sense of togetherness. --When everyone uses 'I's' but never ...
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4answers
133 views

Is “school is off” correct [closed]

Is the expression "Today school is off" correct? I only know the expression "Today school is closed".
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3answers
261 views

Are they “in a good mood“ or ”in good moods"?

Just now I was walking my dogs down S St. in Sacramento. We were gaining on a woman walking in front of us, when she turned around to see who was behind her. "Sorry," I said. "We aren't going to ...
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58 views

Term for an item that is both selected and visible

I have an HTML table of items. Items can be hidden, filtered or selected, so I am currently using the terms "selected", "visible", "filtered" and "all" to indicate which items the user wants to ...
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2answers
46 views

“Up and at 'em with a heart that's full of glee!”

My mother used to wake us with this phrase, "Up and at 'em with a heart that's full of glee!" I've seen the use of "Up and at 'em!" before, but not with the addition that my mom used. Has anyone else ...
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2answers
77 views

Is it right “Smile in love”? [closed]

If a person is in love with someone, can I say that she has got a smile in love? I need it in a sentence where smile (or a synonymous) is the subject and "in love" (or a synonymous) is the attribute. ...
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49 views

“Preventing them to wrap” vs “Preventing them from wrapping”

I've found on StackOverflow an old answer written by me, in which I've used the first form. Reading it now, it sounds weird and wrong; I am inclined to think that the second form is the only one ...
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0answers
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“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the below. "Dollar rebounds biggest falls" Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should be "dollar rebounds after its biggest falls" instead.
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preposition choice: on; close the gap on

"Wal-Mart says it wants to double its stores in China by the end of 2006 to close the gap on its rival Carrefour. -CNN I'm unsure if the preposition 'on' was properly used in the line quoted ...
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Names for different forms of “command” sentences and their parts [closed]

Edit: I'm rewording the question, so as to maybe make it more answerable. My goal: I'd like to create a parser that allows my program to accept certain types of english sentences. In particular, I ...
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2answers
78 views

Is the expression 'What's one say?' corrent?

I've just heard an unfamiliar phrase from a video: What's the driver say? At first, I thought I just couldn't follow what the actor said but I confirmed that what I had heard was right from the ...
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2answers
206 views

Obtain permission to do something or obtain a permit allowing somebody to do something

Could you tell me if these sentence is appropriate ? I know it is correct though. But, sounds to me odd. "the Jewish community in Parczew managed to obtain a permit allowing them to transport the 200 ...
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I need a big word for 'steady', if it exists [closed]

I'm looking for some "big words" to use in a set of gifts that relate directly to the giftees and their personalities. I was able to find jocular for playful and scrupulous for diligent pretty easily, ...
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How to “quote” for a discount

Often on advertising material, one will see instructions to "quote (phrase) for a discount", for example when booking a hotel or other service. Examples here, here and here. How would one be ...
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2answers
59 views

Plugging one's ears

can somebody share with me their knowledge? How to call in the best way the action of puting fingers in one's ears in order not to hear sth or sb. I know there is "to plug one's ears" but I also ...
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83 views

Polite/professional auto-acknowledgment email for support inquries

I am trying to create an auto acknowledgment email for support requests we receive. I want it to look polite and professional, but I find it a bit difficult to word properly since I am not a native ...
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Ability to reason and mental agility

I want to say that math improves the 'ability to reason' and 'elasticity of mind'. This is what I would say in my language (Italian). After a Google search I see that 'ability of reason' is an ...
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2answers
146 views

Translation for 'la douleur exquise'?

I'm looking for a term for 'la douleur exquise'. What I want to capture is the frustration of wanting to be something that everyone loves but knowing you can never be that, where frustration means a ...
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5answers
66 views

Purposefully misinterpreting

I'm looking for an verb that could be used to describe the act of intentionally misinterpreting a written or spoken statement. I'm not seeking the word "mondegreen."
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114 views

Idiom for: “We should attend it even if we have to borrow money.”

I'm translating a script and I should cut this line down by about half it's syllables. I should match to the lip movement of the actors on video, and so that would be about 7 syllables. It doesn't ...
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85 views

It hurts my “feeling” vs “feelings” [closed]

One can see both variants used. Are both correct? And what the difference, if so? I suppose, when word "feeling" is used in this this context, the phrase must be extended with the mention of ...
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What do you call a person, who needs to stay active in order to feel comfortable? [duplicate]

There are some people, who always need to do something. They can't just sit and relax. If they are on the job, they constantly try to change something (e. g. propose new approaches to existing tasks). ...
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(go) off the boil

"(go)off the boil" seems to mean "past the crisis" in British English. What is the origin/etymology of this expression? Is it used nowadays?
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What is a person who participates in computer network chatting, called?

I just wrote the word “chatter”, but then, googling it, I found no definition in the direction of “one who participates in a computer based chat”. Can the role of such a person ...
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80 views

I've just had a cup: is it correct?

Is it correct to say like this? "Would you like some tea?" "Thank you, but I've just had a cup" Would it be more idiomatic to say had one? Or both options are wrong? If so, how would you ...
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71 views

What's “exchange dark looks with somebody” mean [closed]

I've read a sentence "He exchanged dark looks with his wife". But I cannot understand what does the expression "exchange dark looks" mean even though looking up for dictionaries. I'll appreicate ...
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66 views

Word/expression for inclination toward using disadvantageous tools

What is the best word/expression to describe a phenomenon or tool that, despite its disadvantages, is used by people? In fact, there are some alternatives for them, however, there is a weird ...
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135 views

Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …? [closed]

The original expression, from the famous Chinese book 'Zhuangzi' continues: "君子之交淡如水,小人之交甘若醴 ..." and its author is expressing that true friendships are like water, but that some relationships, in ...
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4answers
126 views

A shorter form of question “Did it happen by coincidence?”

Imagine one person saying: "Oh, both Mary and John called me at the same time". Another asks: "Did it happen by coincidence?". I want to find the shortest possible way of asking the same ...
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50 views

Alternative to the expression “we are going to”

At the moment I'm writing a sort of economical report over Bosch GmbH. That's a group work and I would like to report our data and our analysis in the most clear and straightforward way. I have an ...
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1answer
65 views

“He cooked me a soup with a lot of hot oil”

I'm looking for an English equivalent to a Persian expression which means this person got me in a lot of trouble. Literally translated, the expression is this person cooked a soup for me that had too ...
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1answer
43 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
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286 views

Annual school events

How would you call these kind of events organized by schools at the end of the year generally in June where children (6 to 12 years old) sing, dance or act? In French we say : "Fête annuelle de ...