Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2
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3answers
64 views

Word for “quietly accumulating shares of stock by traders when the stock is at a lower price”?

I'm looking for a word or expression that means "the act of quietly accumulating shares of stock by traders when the stock is at a lower price"?
0
votes
1answer
85 views

What's is the meaning of the phrase “Read it like you've written it”? [closed]

Does the meaning of the phrase changes on its usage? If it changes, how? I am hoping an answer based on how it changes with what people are concerned, like for an example: 1) If I have written an ...
1
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0answers
56 views

dressed in tails [closed]

What is dressed in tails? Last night I dressed in tails, pretended I was on the town As long as I can dream it's hard to slow this swinger down ...
3
votes
3answers
334 views

What to call it or someone who easily laughs about something which isn't funny? [closed]

This kind of person always or easily laughs, not because something is so funny, but because that person is easily e.g. nervous, agitated, has a short attention span, bit retarded and hasn't really got ...
0
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0answers
45 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

What does expression “speak up to the point” mean?

I just used the expression speak up to the point as a way of saying: Express without blathering Get directly to the actualy point Have I used this expression correctly? Are there any other better ...
0
votes
2answers
103 views

Single word for attributing inappropriate motives to others' actions?

Is there a single word to describe someone who often attributes inappropriately trivial/cheap motives to another person's actions? I'm thinking along the lines of someone who puts himself briefly in ...
0
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2answers
81 views

Term or expression which best describes a problem that goes away when an expert attempts to diagnose it?

There is a phenomenon which I've seen happen across many circumstances. Generally, it goes something like this: The complainant has a recurring observable problem. The complainant contacts an ...
1
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2answers
45 views

Born into the right house [closed]

What does it mean to be "born into the right house". Sample: "He is born into the right house".
20
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9answers
4k views

Are there English equivalents to a Japanese old saying, “Be the mouth of cock rather than remaining as the tail of ox”?

Every time I hear about the success story of entrepreneurs such as IT business, not to mention Apple, Microsoft, and Soft Bank founders, an old Japanese saying, 鶏口となるとも牛後となる勿れ‐“(Choose to) be the ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

Does “clandestine ignorance” make sense? [closed]

Does the following make sense, "clandestine ignorance"? I would like to see if anyone else is thinking the same way as to the meaning or definition as I do. Thanks.
2
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2answers
122 views

Appropriate word for very fast [closed]

Can some one tell me the appropriate word instead of 'very fast' in sentence: Don't loose hope very fast.
0
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2answers
92 views

Why do we say “bless you”?

I don't mean when someone sneezes or when someone's been kind to you, but in other situations. Like, when someone is enjoying a lot of luck, fortune or doing staggeringly well in something. Or ...
-1
votes
3answers
260 views

Is it OK to say “There is no problem if you do it next week.”?

I need to reply to a commercial email where my "colleague" says that he we will do the job next week. Is it good English to say "There is no problem if you do it next week." ? Is there another way to ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Substituting “comes to” with “expresses as/as to” for equivalence

Ex. "passing the exam can be expressed as to get high marks above ten". I wanted to say "passing the exam comes to get high marks above ten" Is this sentence correct? How to use "expresses..as" in ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

English equivalent or Expression for “Who take care of a Pregnant Mother”

English is not my language and I need help with this... I need create a name for an mobile app that will help pregnant womens for 9 months giving tips about everything about she and her babe. So ...
0
votes
4answers
153 views

Using “mentioned above” when speaking

Is it valid to say "mentioned above" when one reference to something one have previously said? Context example (transcript from The Law of One): Questioner: George Van Tassel built a machine in ...
1
vote
6answers
91 views

What's a good word for 'A short review'?

This would be a topic in a progress report that would outline what the project is about without going into details. I'm looking for something that means like 'Refresher' but sounds more professional.
1
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1answer
73 views

Meme expression synonyms / explanation

Could someone please disambiguate / deconstruct all the nuanced meanings of the following types of expressions originating in internet meme culture. At some point it becomes obvious there's more than ...
1
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1answer
72 views

What is Nerd Test all about? [closed]

Not sure, where to ask this. I did it here, and it was put in Hold , finally attempting here as a last try!! I am really curious(!) to know what is this? I got this link randomly about how nerd are ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Noun for “the version that I handed in”

At university, we get problem sets, I work on them and hand them in. Then a tutor corrects them and gives them back to me. On my website, I want to provide both (since the former is digital, the ...
2
votes
2answers
496 views

“Follow close behind” vs “follow closely behind”?

I just came across something I'd written a while ago that contained the phrase "follows close behind", and my first thought was that it was incorrect and should be "follows closely behind", i.e. to ...
25
votes
8answers
5k views

Is there a polite way of saying “people like you”?

It seems that "people like you" is almost always used as an insult (similar to "your kind"). e.g. A shop owner might say to an annoying customer that doesn't buy anything, "Go away, I don't have time ...
0
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1answer
131 views

Does the phrase 'Harsh, but fair' actually make sense? [closed]

Very often I hear the phrase 'harsh but fair' used to describe something that is unduly severe, but ultimately just. I don't think that it even makes sense, though - and although I've tried to discuss ...
1
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2answers
139 views

A proper closing expression for informal email

What is an expression that you can use at the end of an informal email, when you forgot something and want to add it to the email after your signature?
1
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2answers
2k views

Wish someone 'good luck' for an operation

What is a good way of wishing someone 'good luck' for an operation? The words 'good luck' don't sound right, especially because it is a very difficult operation with lots of severe risks.
2
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1answer
56 views

Words for “everyday details” that illustrate life

When talking about things used in a performance to illustrate conditions of life (like jam-jars and baskets to show village life), can I call them everyday details?
-1
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1answer
182 views

What's a better way of saying “rarely used”

I'm writing an article about using rarely used English words and how to learn and use them. As an example I'd like to find an alternate way of saying "rarely used" I believe there should be one word ...
13
votes
8answers
3k views

What to call someone who always sincerely shows on the outside how and what he feels on the inside?

So, this person is very open, honest and brave to display his vulnerabilities and feelings (because that's what feels natural for him, and as a good thing, to do) whether he's out in public, with ...
2
votes
4answers
108 views

How you do you say “What is this word?” in a friendly, indirect and elaborate way?

In French, when you don't know what the hell a word means that's just been mentioned, instead of flat-out asking “What is that?” we have an informal expression “Hmmm, ça se mange?” (Litterally, “can ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Open the rivers of Heaven?

I've heard someone saying "Their task in worship is to open the rivers of Heaven", and I understand that it means something like "Their task is to make worship extremely beautiful", but is there a ...
1
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2answers
58 views

You heard me! (expression)

What's some alternatives of saying "You heard me" while snapping back at someone (in informal and formal situations both) ? Can I say "You heard it"? Also in a formal setting when dealing with jerks ...
19
votes
2answers
2k views

Answering a question with another question when the answer is obviously 'Yes'

I heard it in the TV Series Fargo, Episode 9. Here is the transcript: A: We still on for golf next week? B: Course we are, Burty Burt. A: But more importantly, are you and Louise still gonna ...
0
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1answer
41 views

degrees of temperature and humidity [closed]

I am currently working on a game where the different areas of the map will have different climates. I wish to have 5 different levels of temperature and humidity for the different climates. I ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Relationship Literary Term

What is it called in text when a character refers to someone as "son of_____" or "descendant of_____". Like when they refer to a person as the relation to someone else
0
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1answer
59 views

Shall I put the adjective behind the noun in this case?

"Function" means the performance of something, so it is on a level different from "project".(self-made) Here what I mean is that the two words are on different levels, the first may refer to ...
4
votes
1answer
135 views

What does “Gay as Dad's old hatband” refer to?

I have seen the phrase "Gay as Dad's old hatband" more than once in twentieth century American fiction. I think it is playing on the double meaning of gay, but what is the happy (bright colored?) ...
0
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1answer
70 views

How to use “should” to express surprise and expectation respectively?

The value should be zero can be read as two totally different meanings: The value is zero, and we have expected that it would be zero. The value is zero. But we have never expected that it would be ...
0
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1answer
51 views

What is the meaning of the word “along” in this context?

I am a bit confused with the usage of the word "along" in a sentence from some lecture slides "check if X lies on the path along existing neighbors" Does this mean that X is structured in this form: ...
0
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1answer
77 views

Gold or golden nugget?

I can't figure it out. I've seen both been used, but a nugget is presumably gold, or can golden be used as well?
0
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2answers
62 views

Expression/word combination for “object of application”

I need to be able to refer to an object which has/needs something applied to it or used on it. A couple of examples: one liter of paint is needed to paint an area of 10m². 6 birthday candles are ...
1
vote
3answers
208 views

Meaning of “for the day” [closed]

I Google'd "for the day" but it seems that it is not precisely an idiom. Does it mean during day time or for a whole day? Here is the sentence where I found that expression: Now I could take a ...
1
vote
2answers
229 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
2
votes
2answers
206 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
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votes
4answers
45 views

About “the level of perception”

If we talk about a performance that does not reconstruct historical background but is supposed to appeal to our feelings omitting all formal evidences, can we use the expression on the level of ...
1
vote
1answer
297 views

What is the difference between “here goes” and “here it goes”?

I’m wondering what the difference between here goes and here it goes is. When something is going down and I want to express my feeling of “I’ll make it!”, which expression is correct? For example, ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Why do we use “executed” in referral to carrying something out? [closed]

The wording, given the standard meaning of "executed" - which is often in a negative light, as per the term - seems strange. Has the term been adopted into it's current (stated) usage or has it always ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

Does it make sense to use “They're welcome” as a response to “X says thanks”?

I've seen someone respond with "They're welcome" to "X says thanks" where X is another person and/or group of persons. The reply seemed okay to me, but its correctness has been immediately contested ...
0
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3answers
74 views

Is “Well-spokenness” a phrase in current use ?

I had never heard or read this before, but a job ad required "well-spokenness". The American Heritage Dictionary never even mentions "spokenness". Nor does the OED online. Although I think I ...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

Is the usage of “ma'am” in the Philippines correct?

In the Philippines, they use the honorific ma'am before a name, such as Ma'am Garcia or Ma'am Karen. I think this is incorrect use of the word ma'am, but I was told it is acceptable. Is this usage ...