Tagged Questions

Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (5)

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2answers
110 views

Other ways to say a project is ahead of schedule?

I'm looking for ways to say a business project is (or will be) completed ahead of schedule. Obviously, there are plenty of phrases for delayed or on-time statuses, but what are some phrases for ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

How to say that something doesn't take a lot of memory [closed]

I'm working in small marketing company, and we got a task to promote mobile app, we usually work only with our native language which is Bulgarian, but the client insisted to translate promo text on ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the meaning of “all zero at the bone”? I can't make it out

From The Shining, by Stephen King: Jack turned back, all zero at the bone. What is the meaning of this expression?
-1
votes
1answer
48 views

Usage of “Revised Document”

I offer two Word templates and recommend to use one of them in order to get a well-designed document. Using the expression revised document is correct in this case? For example: It is ...
2
votes
3answers
95 views

Anticipation with a positive tone

I am looking for a word or phrase that means I am happy that something will be happening. Existing phrases along this line already exist in popular writing: Movie Y is the most anticipated since ...
0
votes
2answers
234 views

Similar idioms to “When the cat's away, the mice will play”

I wonder if there is any similar idioms to "When the cat's away, the mice will play." I searched on a few websites (the free dictionary, dictionary.com, and cambridge.) but there was no suggestions ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Synonym for “Passion driven”?

What's a word for using one's motivation to accomplish something? I tried passion driven but it doesn't seem to fit. The sentence is: Motivation fosters the dedication needed to ____. or ...
1
vote
1answer
391 views

Origin of “as all get out” meaning “to the utmost degree”

At reference.com, all get out is glossed as “in the extreme; to the utmost degree”, and at thefreedictionary.com as an unimaginably large amount; “British say ‘it rained like billyo’ where ...
2
votes
8answers
148 views

“Food for thought” in a word

How can I express "food for thought" in a word? Does such a word exist? Example usage: The world will only know peace when our love for power is exceeded by our power to love. That's __ ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

What is the difference between “in my opinion” and “to my taste”?

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/to+my+taste http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/for%20my%20taste I don't see in those links any mention of opinion, it's not even a synonym. Are ...
8
votes
10answers
5k views

'Enjoy the rest of your day'. What is the name for such expressions?

Nowadays people everywhere will, after a conversation, invite you to 'enjoy the rest of your day'. When on holiday on one occasion I was urged to 'enjoy the rest of your holiday'. What is the purpose ...
38
votes
6answers
3k views

“For all it's worth” or “for all its worth”?

Should I put an apostrophe in "for all its worth"? The meaning comes to about the same thing either way, as far as I can make out, and it seems like "it's" is more popular. But is there an accepted ...
4
votes
4answers
812 views

What is it called when you say something but it does not imply for the other?

I'm really lost for words... For example, I like people with short hair. But then someone could say, so you hate people with long hair? But, of course, I did not give any information on people with ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

turn right backward or turn slightly right backward?

Please see the image. When giving directions, how should I describe what the arrow indicates on the road? My ideas are turn right backward turn slightly right backward I'm not sure if they ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

What does “the balcony is really far away” mean?

Yesterday, I watched MasterChef America. There were two teams competing in the challenge of cooking and serving food at a football game. There were 100 voters and the red team won the blue team by 51 ...
1
vote
2answers
487 views

Why do they say “may not” for things which people shouldn't do

I have seen in so many place where they would have mentioned "You may not.." etc for the things people shouldn't do. For eg: in companies where USB is not allowed, they will mention like this "You may ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Can “to me” be used adverbially?

[...] which, to me, has a strong [...] Provided that the excerpt above is correct regarding the commas, can I omit them? As in: [...] which to me has a strong [...]
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Usage or abusage? [duplicate]

English is not my first language. I live, and work, among people who do not have English as their first language. I notice many instances where grammar has been abused. Sometimes, I am not sure ...
1
vote
1answer
218 views

“At the service of” versus “in the service of”

In doing a translation on duolingo, another translator had translated a phrase to say "at the service of X". I edited this to "in the service of X" and left a comment that as a native speaker, hearing ...
5
votes
6answers
276 views

A word for “remorse” but without guilt

What is the word for the feeling of "remorse," but without guilt? Such as, sadness for a poor outcome, but with the realization that the actions taken were necessary or the best with the given amount ...
1
vote
4answers
255 views

Expressions to describe having immediately understood someone's personality

What words could I use to describe the event of having successfully and completely "read" or understood someone's personality, upon first meeting that someone?
2
votes
2answers
58 views

“Great Divide” synonyms

I am looking for strong, yet poetic expressions/synonyms of "Great Divide" which, beside its other meanings, expresses "a major point of division, especially death." The context I need is the act of ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

What does “trouble at pit” mean?

I saw this in an article about which British accents sound more intelligent, apparently Yorkshire was once deemed as a place with "trouble at pit". It probably has an origin related to auto racing, ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

A “Frankenstein's monster” similar metaphors

Although originally it's a novel character, a "Frankenstein's monster" became a metaphor for "something that cannot be controlled and that attacks or destroys the person who invented it." However, are ...
1
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2answers
97 views

“This is not Scandinavia.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/06/opinion/thomas-friedman-revelations-in-the-gaza-war.html says: The second pillar, which debuted in the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war, is to nest Hamas fighters and ...
0
votes
4answers
335 views

Expression for “preaching to someone who already agrees”?

Is there any phrase/expression to express the situation where someone is preaching or giving advice to someone who already understands and agrees with them and the whole speech is unnecessary. ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

What are notable uses of the phrase “living hand to mouth”

I would like to use the phrase "living hand to mouth" as a title of an art piece. However, just looking for the phrase mostly results in uses where the origin is explained. What are notable uses of ...
6
votes
1answer
331 views

Is there something grammatically strange about the expression 'To blame'?

Is there something unusual about the phrase: 'He is to blame'? It seems to be a shorter form of the passive 'He is to be blamed'. Does this make it some kind of adjective with a to-infinitive form? ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Would you guys change the following sentence suitable for my cover letter? [closed]

I need your help guys:) I am applying for an instructor position at a university in the States. Would you please change the following statement appropriate for my cover letter? "My bachelor's degree ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

“Seriously speaking” or just “seriously”?

Is the expression seriously speaking redundant? For example: [A asks a question] [B replies with a joke] [A and B laugh] B: No, seriously (speaking), I came to visit my mom. I ...
-3
votes
3answers
82 views

squeezed every drop of meaning and enjoyment? [closed]

I'd like to know what 'squeeze every drop of meaning and enjoyment' means in the following. B is said to be a more specific version of A, but I suspect that 'squeeze every drop of meaning' is not a ...
0
votes
5answers
155 views

A man who keeps his word

I'm looking for an appropriate word to describe someone who is a man of his word. Trustworthy springs to mind but doesn't seem appropriate, as it doesn't imply an honorable connotation associated ...
0
votes
3answers
632 views

What is the meaning of the expression “handsome devil”?

I found answers on many web sites and they differed too much so I decided to ask the community. edit I call him the devil because he makes me wanna sin... Urban Dictionary A good-looking ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

“Something to the rescue!” vs “Something for the rescue” — which one is correct?

I was wondering which one of the following constructions below is grammatically correct? Or both are acceptable? Something to the rescue! Something for the rescue!
0
votes
3answers
583 views

'I thought', 'I would think', 'I would have thought'

I'm going to show you three examples. 1. A - Have you got any change?     B - Do I have change? What for?     A - For the vending machine! ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

What is the meaning of these phrases in the given context?

I was reading a novel, and came across a couple of sentences which I couldn't really get the meaning of. The particular sentences are marked in bold, and I've added some background, for the context. ...
0
votes
3answers
86 views

What's it called when someone forms a general conclusion from something which is aberrant?

I'm trying to think of a phrase that describes someone who is in a certain situation and when an outcome out of the norm comes up then he takes the aberrant outcome and generalizes it, believing it to ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

What does this line mean : “The man's high tone spread throughout the spacious bar”

I am reading this light novel called GGO and in it I came across these lines: "AGI (Agility) being all powerful is just an illusion." The man's high tones spread throughout the spacious ...
3
votes
3answers
123 views

Meaning of “hinder parts” in the 17th century

While reading the works of William Laud in the edition by William Scott, I came across a description (No 2 on page 345) where it seems the Scots are upset about a ritual in which a priest turns his ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

It can be happened.. is it false to utter it?

is it wrong to use this expression " It can be happened...". In fact many of colleagues said that the right expression is " It can happen". Do you have any comments on this?
1
vote
1answer
282 views

Replacement for the annoying habit of saying “I was like”

I am new here, so my first question would be to ask about an annoying habit that I, as well as many other people out there, seem to have... During the telling of a story I will often say this one ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Do “in a black study” and “in a brown study” mean the same?

I encountered relatively often the expression "to be in a brown study" but I can find nothing about the "black" version of the same expression. I found it in William Hope Hodgson's The Island of the ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

A simple question about syntax [closed]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
-2
votes
1answer
87 views

How to express “Help someone secretly”

One of my friend always helps me but does not want me to know that he helps me. Is there a word or phrase to describe this secret helping? Also, if someone wanted to thank the secret helper, is there ...
0
votes
3answers
78 views

What is the correct expression: “the estimate number” or “the estimated number?”

I have been looking for a place that tells me which expression is correct, but I didn't get any satisfactory answer. Google returns 2,060,000 results for "the estimate number of *", and 73,200,000 ...
10
votes
1answer
354 views

Describing a group of people who lie down in a public place to send a political message

I was walking through the square, and I came upon a group of people all lying on the ground. Each had a printout on their chest with a political message, and nobody was moving. What word or phrase ...
2
votes
4answers
161 views

Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter

I am changing my e-mail signature on my phone to read: Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Please do not mistake my brevity and/or misspellings for apathy and/or ignorance. I am looking for a ...
1
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2answers
150 views

Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison

Is there a term which would sound more fitting in an academic or professional setting for describing a comparison between two things highlighting the similarity of the measurement/comparison process?
9
votes
8answers
1k views

What is meant by “same difference”?

Unless you are comparing two different sets of items to then have a couple of differences and the differences are the same, I do not get it. This would be analogous to: 12-9=3, 7-4=3. Here we have ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

What's the point in saying “I could care less”? [duplicate]

To care less would mean the caring is more, having room to care less.