Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2answers
56 views

What's the meaning of “should we be interested”?

I contacted someone and he replied: ... I've passed your information along and someone will get back to you should we be interested. After sending him another message he replied: ... ...
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2answers
193 views

“In” or “At” sole discretion

We're drafting some legal stuff, and our lawyer used this phrasing... ...whether any particular enhancement is to be categorized as such shall be made in the sole reasonable discretion of ...
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2answers
88 views

Reserve or book tickets?

In an app I am writing the user can book/reserve tickets for riding a bus. Which of the following terms does fit this process best? 'Reserve Tickets' or 'Book Tickets' Also, in some cases the user ...
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1answer
28 views

“Call off” somebody from his post?

I am looking for a term that I could use to say that the new Minister of Health removed the present holder of the given post from his position. My first idea was call off, but then I looked up the ...
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2answers
124 views

“I, for one, don't know ”

I am curious about the precise meaning of for one in the expression "I, for one, don't know." This came up in a discussion about the amount of social efforts society should be willing to put in ...
-1
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3answers
60 views

“responsible for” in negative context [closed]

Can you use "responsible for" in a negative context? Like the "Kids were responsible for starting the fire". As they were guilty of burning down the house.
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2answers
23 views

Why are integral probabilities read as “n to 1” and not “1 to n”?

Why, when the chances of a certain event are 1/10, it's read as the probability is ten to one and not "the probability is one to ten"? Like there's a 10/1 probability of occurrence, which is not ...
2
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1answer
64 views

noun-modifier word order in 'date certain'

One will occasionally hear the term date certain (meaning 'a fixed, definite date') in legal or business contexts. e.g., The Courts have continually emphasized that the Act demands primary NAAQS ...
2
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3answers
59 views

Can you say “feel to” do something?

Is it correct to say, "I don't feel to trust him," particularly in British English? I'm actually a native speaker, but I live in Italy with my Italian wife, and so I've got so used to her (English ...
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3answers
77 views

What would you call the sound a flute makes?

All I can come up with is the adjective lilting.
2
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2answers
120 views

“At the least” to start a sentence seems right but

The sentence I am trying to construct will be read with the assumption that finding that a bug exists in unfortunate. This is what I want to say, paraphrased: We found a bug in the code. At the ...
2
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2answers
190 views

“On a side note” vs. “by the way”

What's the difference between "on a side note" and "by the way"? Is one of them restricted to certain situations while the other is not?
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3answers
207 views

How can I politely express that “I have understood”?

When my professor instructs me during his/her office hour, I may simply show my understanding by "Got it" or "I see". But I wonder how to say that politely and professionally in written English, ...
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1answer
25 views

' when we hold': usage

The daily judge assignments are posted on the Clerk of Court site – see side bar. I have an attorney going tomorrow to research the records for the name of the judge responsible on February 5 ...
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4answers
205 views

Word or phrase for someone who annoys you as soon as they walk in and start talking

Looking for both a journalistic and perhaps playful term. In a journalistic sense, how would I describe a CEO figure who holds a company meeting and the employees are either annoyed, bored, or rolling ...
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3answers
59 views

What does “tearing your résumé apart in a way” mean?

I asked a résumé checker to check my résumé and she gave me the following answer: When you look at the below list of issues, you'll probably think I'm tearing your resume apart. I guess I am, in a ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Referencing text on a button element?

If a button on a website has text on it, how do you reference that text? For example, if a button had the text "click here" on it would you say "the button that says 'click here'" or "the button ...
1
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2answers
85 views

What's an alternative for “Where the rubber meets the road”

In the past, I've been at a loss to explain the idiom "where the rubber meets the road" to a non-native English speaker without resorting to a similarly confusing idiom. Is there a way to express the ...
2
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3answers
93 views

“social media post” or “social-media post”?

Should 'social media' be treated as a compound adjective in the phrase 'social media post'? To me, the hyphen looks wrong, but I would like to be able to provide some grammatical rationale to ...
1
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1answer
39 views

local knowledge of the territory

In business language, how could you say: local knowledge of the territory? As in: The company has a deep knowledge of the territory, i.e., logistics, suppliers, clients and people knowledge, etc. ...
2
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2answers
51 views

Does the phase “what's an honest man to do?” have a specific literary origin, or is it simply a common-usage rhetorical question?

I have seen the phrase used in this form or as a template for other rhetorical questions - e.g., "what's an honest economist to do?"; "what's an honest business owner to do?";"what's an honest ...
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1answer
59 views

It's not affect, but can you “effect” something?

I understand the differences between affect and effect, and generally when to use them. However, in some cases while reading I have seen authors use the phrase "effect a change" (among others) ...
1
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1answer
20 views

Is the expression, “…it extended miles and miles around…” correct?

Example: The forest extended miles and miles around the house. Is that expression grammatically correct? Does it make sense?
0
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1answer
50 views

Is it good to begin my response with “Good One”? [closed]

I am planning to respond a comment in one of the other forums in StackExchange! I was wondering if I can begin my response by saying "Good one, .." to confirm that it was a "Good suggestion". In ...
6
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7answers
530 views

Can something be “extremely mediocre”?

This doesn't sound quite right to me, but I can't explain why. I can understand an extreme sense of mediocrity one can get from something but does that justify the usage of "extreme" with "mediocre"?
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3answers
88 views

Can I say “I have been nourishing my passions”?

Can I say "I have been nourishing my passions"? Or something similar to express the figurative fact that "I have been developing and nourishing them"?
3
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1answer
110 views

'Complete a confusion' — expression or confusion?

Is complete someone's confusion a popular expression that makes sense? This expression pops up so often I wonder I am missing something here. Does complete here mean to 'resolve'/ 'clarify'? ...
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3answers
95 views

What is the meaning of the expression?

What does "Get all you can, can all you get, sit on the can." mean? It seems that Google can't help me with this one. Could you also explain its origin and how it is related to the meaning?
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2answers
134 views

How did the phrase “hear you out” or “hear me out” come about?

How did the phrase "hear you out" or "hear me out" come about? The phrase means "listen to whatever I have to say before you pass judgment on me," or "tell me whatever you want; I don't mind and ...
4
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2answers
238 views

What is the context in which 'ice breaking' is a good thing?

If you are on a frozen lake and the ice breaks you basically plunge into cold water. That could end badly. What is the explanation for 'getting to know everyone', or 'getting the conversation ...
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1answer
53 views

A word that refers to a previously mentioned action [closed]

I am trying to refer back to the action "act swiftly" mentioned previously, but I am not sure if I am in the right direction. I thought of a few possible solutions as follows. An entire rephrasing of ...
2
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3answers
146 views

“Who doors wins”

What does this expression mean? Who doors wins Is it an idiom? Or is it a typo? Apparently, it makes no sense.
1
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1answer
50 views

Agenda going from bold to bite-sized

What does "one's agenda going from bold to bite-sized" mean?
-1
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1answer
62 views

difference between or used with/without bracket

What is the key differences between these sentences: Namespaces defined using object literal notation may be easily extended (or merged) with other objects (or namespaces) such that the properties ...
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2answers
157 views

Meaning of “run flat out”

What does "I can run flat out for a half mile before my hands start shaking" mean? It was said in The Bourne Identity. I am not a native English speaker. I know the meaning of the individual words, ...
178
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32answers
72k views

Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?

The phrase "sleeping with someone" often means "having sex." What is the origin of this sexual connotation? Is there a non-sexual equivalent of this phrase to express sleeping with someone without ...
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1answer
301 views

One word/phrase to describe the reaction when you eat a very spicy-hot food

I've read the discussion here about Difference between “spicy” and “hot”. I've also read this one: How to say that food is hot (temperature) without the listener thinking that I mean “spicy”?. But I ...
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2answers
68 views

Is “at” or “of” unnecessary in “people his parents’ age”?

There was the following sentence in Maureen Dawd's article introducing a Denber couple who are catering to marijuana tourists at their inn under the headline, “Now playing in Denver: Reefer Gladness” ...
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2answers
59 views

Saying for not doing something because it is futile [duplicate]

Is there such a saying? Futile may be either because it will fail or because it is unnecessary / already taken care of. I considered: too many chefs spoil the broth and It's like carrying coals to ...
1
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2answers
71 views

What's the meaning of “turning the state of the art to the state of the practice”?

What's the meaning of "turning the state of the art to the state of the practice" in the following context: "We have the resources, the professional experience and the background to deliver turnkey ...
1
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1answer
122 views

What does it mean to have a 'saucy facial expression'?

What does it mean to have a 'saucy facial expression'? I came upon a comment saying that and I have no idea what it means.
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18answers
7k views

Is there a word for being so polite as to appear insincere?

I'm looking for a term in English to describe being so polite that one appears to be insincere.
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3answers
4k views

“thank you for the kind words”

I have seen and/or heard the sentence "thank you for the kind words" more than once. The context is usually that the speaker is responding to an appreciative comment in a discussion whose overall ...
3
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1answer
53 views

Do you change your career or careers?

When you change from one thing to another, you say like you change trains, shirts, etc. How about when you make a career change? Do you say you change your career or you change careers?
2
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5answers
116 views

What is the origin of the expression “legislate from the bench”?

What is the origin of the expression "legislate from the bench" used to describe "judicial activism" in the United States? Do judges have different seating arrangements from congressmen? In more ...
4
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4answers
724 views

What is the difference between complacency and condescension?

Sometimes I get confused between complacency and condescension, thinking they are the same thing. I am trying to understand the difference. Both seem to be attributes of a person who is more ...
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1answer
79 views

Looking for an expression that means “I'm at an event right now”

Is there any simple and frequently used expression that means "I'm at an event right now", like "I'm here", or "I'm present"?
2
votes
2answers
186 views

What do you call slapping someone at the back of their head

I know there is bitch-slap, that is when you you hit someone a male or a female with back of you hands (sometimes) when they act or do stupid. I want to know the word that is subtle in nature, that ...
1
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1answer
427 views

“sounds fun” or “sounds like fun”

If you say, "it is fun playing golf", I think "fun" is a noun. When I hear people say, "it sounds fun," is it a noun or an adjective? I understand the verb "sound" is followed either by a noun or an ...
0
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2answers
128 views

Explain the meaning of the two sentences

I'm a bit confused by these two sentences: The general government consumption expenditures are used as another measure of government size, although they do not account for the full government ...