Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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109 views

Can you “Build a coffee”? [closed]

Would it be valid or invalid English, to use phrases along the following lines: Can you build a coffee? I'm building a coffee I'm going to go and build a coffee I built a coffee Etc.
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1answer
44 views

“Walk off/away on someone”

I'm looking for an expression to describe the action of someone suddenly walking away in the middle of a conversation with another person, because, for instance, s/he has been offended by something ...
0
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1answer
54 views

What type of marker is [sic] in a text? It is not an editor's mark, so what is it?

The marker "[sic]" is used in a published work to show that a word-usage or spelling is recognised by the author to be incorrect or unconventional. On the other hand, editors' marks (proofreading ...
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1answer
52 views

What to use for 'first unimpressive but later better'?

I will explain a few situations : It is often the case that I listen to a song which doesn't impress me in the first minute or so but as it progresses, I like it A trained batsmen struggles in the ...
3
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1answer
448 views

What does the expression “so we can short it” means?

I was browsing the internet and found the following discussion Their rules are remarkably lax. I would fire the shit out of anyone who wrote a 60 line function, without any hesitation (barring ...
2
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2answers
64 views

What does expression “naked to the world” mean?

What does expression "naked to the world" mean? I've heard it in a series Suits, season 2, episode 4, at the 20th minute. Full sentence: "Give me the address and tell Donna to hurry up. I'm naked to ...
2
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1answer
76 views

Sporting beard Vs keeping beard [closed]

For non-native speakers of English language the usage, someone sporting beard may appear odd.They wonder as to why "someone keeping the the beard well trimmed or leaving beard matted" is not ...
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1answer
53 views

English word for superstitiously negative self assumption

Is there an English word (or psychological condition), which describes the negative, fearful, superstitious mentality of immediate self application or assumption? For example if I was to say "my ...
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2answers
64 views

What is the exact definition of “set off” in the expression “set off by (a pair of) commas?”

It seems to me that in English usage "set off" is almost irreplaceable in the collocation I refer to in the question and in similar phrases, e.g., "comma(s) set(s) off (this or that)." As if everyone ...
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0answers
34 views

Another way to say “Condolence”

I'm looking for words/phrases that can substitute the use of word "condolence" during a funeral. I'm searching for another alternative to avoid repetition of such expression in the grieving party, in ...
0
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1answer
62 views

What is the origin of the phrase “has some teeth to it”?

I know the phrase "has some teeth to it" refers to something that cuts and/or takes hold of something. It's used a lot in arguments / discussion of topics where serious / good counterpoints are used, ...
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1answer
46 views

Connecting sentences with “that is”

Suppose a sentence such as Let X := a and Y := b, that is X is foo and Y is bar .. Is this correct english? I try to first a give a formal mathematical definition of X and Y, and then repeat the ...
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2answers
263 views

“to take someone to task” does not mean to make someone do something?

I just looked up the translation of the German expression jemanden zur Rede stellen. The one translation for that expression I found was to take someone to task. I use the German expression to ...
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5answers
142 views

A phrase describing someone who is incredibly lazy? [closed]

Is there a phrase that would describe a person that is lazy beyond anything reasonable? Someone who almost feels entitled to everything and fails to see the laziness in himself.
0
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1answer
54 views

Is the expression “You the Man” gender neutral?

The expression "You The Man" is generally used to compliment a male. Can this expression be used to compliment a female? If not, what is a suitable alternative?
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5answers
107 views

How do you say “people, who unfortunately weren't fully exterminated” in English?

Imagine, there is a social group, which I think is so evil they have to be banished or exterminated. For example: Freedom Party of Austria represents not fully exterminated Nazi scum and their ...
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2answers
69 views

Could I combine “eaves-” (doing something stealthily) with other action?

As far as I know, I only know two words have "eaves-" that means "to doing something stealthily" — "eavesdrop" and "eavesread". eavesdrop (Wiktionary) "... purposefully trying to hear the ...
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3answers
45 views

Alternatives for the phrase “have disputed the use of”

Here is a random quote from the internet: American policy makers and the general public have disputed the use of aggressive interrogation methods for military intelligence. What would be some ...
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2answers
51 views

Is “moonstruck adventure” an actual term/expression? [closed]

Encountered the phrase "moonstruck adventure" repeatedly in a text i'm dealing with (in the context of bad decisions made by someone that nearly led to disastrous results) - is that a proper term or ...
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3answers
62 views

Proverbial or not

"Whenever you see a deaf man running follow him, he has seen an impending danger not just heard it."- Has anything proverbial in this sentence?
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3answers
267 views

Addressing British nobility in third person [closed]

Is it correct to say "Their Lordship"while referring to British nobility ?
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1answer
27 views

Adding website URL in reference section of report writing

I was wondering what kind of format is standard or recommended style of mentioning URL of a website in report writing. What I found in the internet after a quick search was Cameron, B (Minister ...
2
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2answers
106 views

Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?

Think of Daniel Radcliffe. Is there an expression that describes his situation or state of him always being associated with Harry Potter by many people?
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3answers
125 views

Word to describe something of something of something

What is a word for recursion/nesting of an entity in English ? I'm looking for a word that replaces the colloquially used -ception suffix. A generic term that encapsulates all nested attributes. For ...
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3answers
112 views

Need polite phrases expressing disagreement with the information/conclusions of another person, especially an educator [closed]

My classmate told me I should always say, "With all due respect," or "I politely disagree," when disagreeing someone - especially an educator - in order to avoid being perceived as rude. For example: ...
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0answers
57 views

I want to know a quote of Ralph Waldo Emerson [closed]

A quote attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson is, Do what you know and perception is converted into character. I don't understand its meaning well. Would you convert this old sentence into modern ...
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2answers
4k views

How to correctly use the expression “safe travel(s)”?

A colleague of mine recently reached out to me. I asked if he would like to meet up sometime to which he notified me that he would be traveling the remainder of this week. In what context is it okay ...
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1answer
26 views

What is the best and most concise way to Describe a Town and its Surroundings? [closed]

I am creating a Text Based Game. When a character arrives in a Town, they are supposed to describe the town that they are in based on the buildings that are in the town. At the moment I have a very ...
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1answer
33 views

What is the right use for each expression? [closed]

You can call me at my cell phone. You can call me on my cell phone. You can call me from my cell phone. You can call me via my cell phone. What are the differences among them?
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1answer
98 views

How else could you tell a person you “are curious about them”? [closed]

For example, "You induce/promote/inspire curiosity in me." "I am very curious in you." (Sounds awful)
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5answers
83 views

Is there a better way to say “the highest possible”

Here is the sentence I am trying to improve: "How building a culture of Quality results in better care and the highest possible reimbursement revenue." Seems clunky but I'm a bit stuck. ...
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7answers
2k views

What expression to use when a wave hits the beach and fades away?

I am looking for word or expression that refers to the moment when a wave, with all its strength, closes itself, hits the beach and fades away.
0
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1answer
49 views

Expressions connected to heavenly bodies

Do these expressions,Saturnine personality,mercurial temperament,lunatic,venusian arts,martial arts,attribute their origin to astrology?
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23answers
4k views

Name for someone whose interest might be to discredit one's results by trying to find hypothetical mistakes?

What do you call a person whose interest might be to discredit your results by trying to find hypothetical mistakes? This person does not seem to focus on solving a problem with pragmatism. Is there a ...
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4answers
71 views

Word(s) that emphasize or magnify the separator rather than the separated

One can say, “Trees separated by fences”, or “Posts split by comments”; or use the active, “Fences separate the trees” and “Comments split the posts”. The mind's eye may see posts with the first ...
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1answer
72 views

English equivalent for the Indian saying

Is there an English equivalent for the Indian saying " A wandering monk and running water never get polluted".
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1answer
38 views

History of the phrase 'Nina from Carolina'

According to online dictionaries, the definition of this is "the sum of 8 and 1" or 9. What is the origin of this?
0
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1answer
55 views

should have instead of could have [closed]

I've heard this on a crime documentary. Two intruders break into a house, a confrontation ensues with the residents (wife and husband). The couple manages to disarm one man and fight off the other. ...
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1answer
43 views

Serving wine/drinks [closed]

You're pouring wine for your friend.If your friend can only drink a little.What expression would you use that means"tell me if this amount of wine is ok for you"?
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2answers
50 views

Asking permission [closed]

If you want to enter someone's bedroom and you want to avoid unpleasant situations(they're changing their clothes,for example) what would you say?
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2answers
59 views

Classic word or phrase for many in one

I am looking for a word which describes many in one in classic english. If possible please provide modern word ideas as well.
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1answer
28 views

Is ‘return good’ an idiomatic response?

Can I reply to someone's ‘Thank you’ with ‘return good’? For example: A: Thank you for all your advice and guidance. B: You're welcome, I hope it will return good on you.
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2answers
31 views

Is “may or may not X” logically incorrect?

Thoughts on redundancy aside, using or in this phrase seems wrong to me. Should it not be and? My reasoning is this: There are only two possibilities on the actions concerning X -- either X will be ...
2
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1answer
66 views

History of the Expression “Search Me”

The phrase "search me" is so ubiquitous in the English language that it is found on every list of common idioms. It is a situational idiom for "I don't know" in response to any direct question. But ...
3
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1answer
45 views

Can any old loud noise be called stentorian?

In his book about monsters, "The Foundling," D. M. Cornish describes the arrival of an ettin or giant: "Suddenly the whole forest seemed to burst with a stentorian cracking." A voice can be ...
0
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2answers
100 views

Cost-benefit analysis: expressions, idioms, phrases or words that convey a sense of whether something is “worth it”. Any suggestions?

I'm looking for any expressions that can be used to convey a sense of "cost-benefit analysis", whether formal or informal, but not necessarily literally referring to a balance sheet. An expression ...
0
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3answers
117 views

A word for a scrawny, ghastly but wise and academic or studious person

I'm looking for a word, not necessarily a direct “reverse dictionary” sort of word that has the definition above, but even a creative word that can describe, label, or represent that sort of person ...
3
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1answer
119 views

Meaning and origin - “More on point than a sock”

In TV Show "Elementary" - Season 2 - Chapter 15, Dr Watson starts saying: More on point than a sock What is the meaning of this expression? What is the relationships with "points" and "socks"? ...
2
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3answers
125 views

The English equivalent of the Arabic: “Something is innocent of you”

It is used when someone claims to be something, and the other person nullifies his claim. It's like saying they are a liar and that particular thing doesn't have anything to do with him or her. ...
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3answers
73 views

How do you properly define and use the phrase, “buy into”?

I found this line while I was reading: That commercial said that this product would help me lose weight in one week. I’m not buying into that idea. While I somehow understood the meaning of the ...