Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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Meaning of “guy for meetings” [migrated]

What does guy for meetings mean in the following sentence about a man who decreased his alcohol consumption? Going cold turkey hasn't been easy, but Harry was never much of a guy for meetings. ...
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1answer
65 views

What does “broken brush” mean? [closed]

What does the idiom "broken brush" mean? I first supposed it was a technical phrase used in painting (Impressionism) , and afterwards in Photoshop devices, but now I guess it is more probably a slang ...
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2answers
52 views

He stayed a week vs he stayed for a week

He stayed a week vs He stayed for a week I consider her my friend vs I consider her as my friend. I don't know whether he can be there vs I don't know if he can be there I often hear ...
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39 views

Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...
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3answers
68 views

Word, expression for copying someone who inspires you

All of us have a person; our elder siblings or friends or any one who we are inspired by. For example my elder sister, I love the way she carries herself, her personality, her poise, that I try my ...
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5answers
283 views

What is the origin of the phrase, “I'm Game”

I'm trying to understand the origins of the phrase, "I'm game". Now, I understand how the phrase is used in everyday English, but what are the origins of this phrase? How did it come to imply a ...
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14answers
1k views

Opposite of “out of date”? [on hold]

Can anyone think of a phrase we would use to describe a situation where something is the opposite of "out of date"; that is, it's "too new"? For example, a banana that's been sitting around for ages ...
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3answers
134 views

To rob the grave of the victims

In Napoleon Hill's "Think and grow rich" there is a sentence, which I do no understand I believe in the power of desire backed by faith, because I have seen this power lift men from lowly ...
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3answers
84 views

What does “alright” mean when it's at the end of a sentence?

a. Life has no meaning alright. What does "alright" mean in the sentence above? I can't find it in the dictionary!
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1answer
38 views

How to describe both non-verbal and non-gesture communication?

Suppose we had a technology that reads a person's brain wave and interprets it. Then it sends the interpretated message to the screen in front of another person. What is the word used to the ...
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0answers
45 views

Metonymity of “question being broad”

I learned recently that the expression "question is too broad" is a metonym for "the set of answers is too large". So, I wonder if a question that actually is too broad (lacking imagination I can only ...
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2answers
95 views

Word for deliberately taking the literal rather than implied message

What is the word for understanding someones implied meaning, but being completely pretentious about it and taking their words for what they literally said?
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1answer
1k views

“It worked for me in high school and it's been a reflex ever since”? [closed]

A: Just go out with me one time. If you are miserable, I will never hint at the subject again. B: I don't think it's smart. A: I know that I am an asshole. It worked for me in high school, ...
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2answers
38 views

Expressions or phrasal verbs for very boring

In AE, how could I say something is very boring? I know teenagers would say "it sucks" but is there anything else, phrasal verbs or expressions? If it's something local, I would also ask you to say ...
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3answers
51 views

Opposite of “to put off”

Is there any word, expression or phrasal verb I can use that has the opposite meaning of "put off"? The case I have in mind is this: The meeting would be on saturday, but a lot of things have ...
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3answers
52 views

Way to indicate the number of something

When I want to express the count of something, can I say "xxx number" instead of "the number of xxx"?  For example: "Location number" to mean the number of locations. "Apple number" to mean ...
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2answers
47 views

“Turn slightly right” or “Turn slight right”

This is a grammatical question. For a route navigation, which expression is better to say? "slight" is adjective and "slightly" is adverb, so I guess "Turn slightly right" would be the correct in ...
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5answers
102 views

“Only the good die young.” Negative or Positive? [closed]

I've heard this expression before. I can't tell if its used as a positive one or a negative one? When is it appropriate to use this expression? Is it implying that people that live to be an old age ...
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3answers
501 views

Things saved in the memory of the gone people — are called?

We all love to save things, collect items, items/things those remind us of the departed souls or gone people, gone from life may or may not be dead. What are those things called ? They might not be ...
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5answers
134 views

Keep the good work up / Keep up the good work - Are they both grammatical?

I have always heard “Keep up the good work”, but “Keep the good work up” also sounds fine to me. Is it acceptable?
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0answers
34 views

Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.
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3answers
49 views

Meaning of 'quite at home being home'

I read this in a novel, it was written like this: 'I sensed that after four decades of motel living he wasn't quite at home being home.' Is it some sort of expression and can there be any alternatives ...
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4answers
83 views

Alternatives to “yet on the other hand”

I just read "yet on the other hand" in a published research article and it seemed off to me. Is it just me? Is there a better alternative? Specifically: The yet seems to be redundant to on the other ...
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5answers
304 views

Meryl Streep is a ______? (as a big compliment)

It's a specific word or small phrase that I can't remember, and it's killing me. It was probably an Oscars ceremony, and someone boldly introduced her as a “xxxx”. It was the highest of compliments, ...
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4answers
250 views

Point someone to something

Is it correct to write something along the lines of "She pointed me to a book of X." in the sense of "making me aware of it", "bringing it to my attention"?
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4answers
198 views

Other ways to say 'I plead insanity'

I am writing a one act play about a trial. The evidence is piled against the defendant, and he wants to plead insanity. What are other ways of stating that? What are other ways to refer to that plea? ...
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3answers
68 views

What's the term for the information you gather from someone before deciding to bring them in for an interview?

What is another word for the information you gather from someone before deciding to bring them in for an interview? (Salary Requirements, Commuting Restrictions, etc.) What I'm trying to say is: ...
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1answer
54 views

This might turn out unnecessary vs This might turn out to be unnecessary

Which of the two expressions is correct? Is there any difference
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4answers
207 views

Expression “cold from hell” [closed]

Could you explain what the expression cold from hell means? The context is something along the lines of: I have exercised and currently fighting the cold from hell.
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2answers
81 views

How do you write the expression of disgust that sounds like “er”?

My daughter said to me this morning (the context is irrelevant): Er, it's all wet! The interjection I have written here as Er was synonymous with Yuck. Its wetness did not cause great happiness. ...
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1answer
54 views

Why are you saying something “for” yourself when your parent asks you what you have to say for yourself?

I was listening to a podcast today and heard someone mockingly ask the guest "Well, what do you have to say for yourself?". The conversation spun off in some other direction, but I momentarily ...
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2answers
110 views

What does the expression “Word.” mean? [duplicate]

I was watching the 1989 movie "Bill and Ted's excellent adventure" a couple of weeks back and in one scene Bill replies to some statement (I forgot whom he is replying to) with just "Word." What does ...
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2answers
42 views

What the right expression for “pursue a requirement”?

I have the following sentence in my essay. "We pursue a unique requirement, that is, how to optimally utilize the space for.......". I feel like "pursue a requirement" is a little odd. Any ...
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42 views

“I might as well have imagined” vs “I might as well have been remembering”

Which one is the correct form, or at least the most commonly used? Example: 1207 B.C. Wow, I found it impossible to imagine a time as far in the past as that. I might as well have imagined ...
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3answers
71 views

Right word to describe this kind of search

How do you describe the following kind of 'search' in one word? A blind man searching for a faucet in a room OR A normal man searching for a faucet in a dark room Is it fumbling, scouring, ...
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3answers
61 views

Use and Meaning of 'to be the last one'

I saw a friend's (A) picture on a social network. And a friend (B) of hers commented on it. Apparently (B) was having her finals exams , so (A) remarked "you should be the last person to comment on my ...
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5answers
63 views

Usage of “persons”

I know pretty well that the plural for 'person' is 'people'. But my literature professor used once the word 'persons' because, he said, he was using the word the same as it will be used 'individuals'. ...
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1answer
50 views

Irish folk song: Hunt the Hare, and played some funny rigs

I'm making a choral arrangement of the Irish folk song "Rocky Road to Dublin." One variation of the lyrics is here. I've been able to decipher the meaning of most of the words, many of which were ...
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5answers
176 views

Forcing someone's choice through malicious or careless timing

Let's say Alice needs Bob to make a decision between options 1 and 2. Bob would prefer 1. However, Alice asks Bob at such a time he cannot choose 1, so he is forced to pick 2 except in all but the ...
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1answer
101 views

“By the end of today” or “By the end of the day” [closed]

Which is the correct (or most correct) expression : - By the end of today - By the end of the day my context is a promess to send an email today
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3answers
86 views

a nonrestrictive appositive with a restrictive clause [closed]

Jim's cousin, an olympic athlete, who lives in Boston did X. The nonrestrictive appositive "an olympic athlete" is combined with a restrictive clause "who lives in Boston." Since the comma ...
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1answer
151 views

“All the more so” - correct use:

Is this sentence correct: "If this was true fifty years ago, it must be all the more so in modern times" Did I use the expression "all the more so" correctly in this sentence? Thanks
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1answer
72 views

Cloud nine Vs. Dante's Inferno!

I looked for the expression to be on cloud nine on Etymonline; it is stated 'of uncertain origin or significance'. My question is could there be a connection between the origin of cloud nine and ...
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0answers
35 views

a substitute expression for an ending [duplicate]

I asked this earlier so if one of the post needs to be merged, altered, or deleted let me know. The ending needs to express the idea that I am "ready to begin" in a way that is personal and balanced ...
4
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2answers
508 views

Why is Dolge not a Christian name?

(Note: This might be better suited for a different stack site, but since literature closed, I thought this was the closest related site). I've recently been re-reading Great Expectations, and, in ...
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2answers
60 views

What is a “turkey walk”?

I once read that a "turkey walk" was going to be held on a Sunday at 8.00 a.m. in a small town in New England. I tried to find it in dictionaries and I also googled the expression, but got no ...
2
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4answers
91 views

Up Hill vs. Down Hill [duplicate]

The expression "It's all up hill from here!" and "It's all down hill from here!" mean that things will only get better or things will only get worst. Metaphorically going uphill can provide for a ...
2
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2answers
273 views

Is “I'll be John Brown” a common phrase?

The phrase: I'll be John Brown! is an occasionally-used term in North Carolina. Mostly thought to replace taking the Lord's name in vain (GD). Is it used elsewhere? How long has it been ...
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2answers
51 views

Circumstantial: Can anything be 'circumstantial' but evidence? [closed]

I have come across the word circumstantial but I have only ever seen it used in the phrase 'circumstantial evidence'. I would like to ask if anything can be 'circumstantial' apart from evidence. When ...
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1answer
126 views

A frog in the throat

While the French refer to the temporary hoarseness caused by phlegm in the back of the throat as having a cat in the throat, the English version of the expression is to have a frog in the throat. I ...