Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (5)

2
votes
2answers
31 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

“In Failover” or “Failed over”

Failover is defined as: "A backup operational mode in which the functions of a system component are assumed by secondary system components when the primary component becomes unavailable through either ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

“Tested Recently” or “Recently Tested”?

Is there one term that is clearly better than the other? Here is the use case: I have a computer system which shows when certain machines have been tested. The possible values are "Ready For Test", ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Can starting with: “The bottom line is” be considered redundant if the reader can clearly see that's, in fact the bottom line

My questions is, can the expression "the bottom line is" be considered redundant in an example like so: "[A long, detailed text or answer.] The bottom line is, it doesn't really matter." ...
3
votes
2answers
46 views

How would you term a person who gives you a job opportunity and then reminds you to be grateful that he's given you that opportunity

How would you term a person who gives you a job opportunity and then reminds you to be grateful that he's given you that opportunity....
2
votes
2answers
38 views

Does the phrase “present company excepted” exclude the speaker as well as the listener?

A common idiom is, when speaking to someone, to raise a general criticism and then amend it by saying "present company excepted". This is taken to mean that the criticism is not intended to apply to ...
6
votes
4answers
506 views

How do you call..? vs. What do you call…?

It seems an open-and-shut case, the correct version for asking the word of something in English is What do you call ... ? And yet the sheer number of second-language speakers of English who ask ...
4
votes
2answers
98 views

What is wrong with expressions like “leave no stone unturned”?

In George Orwell's Politics and the English Language he says: Silly words and expressions have often disappeared, not through any evolutionary process but owing to the conscious action of a ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Looking for a word or phrase that describes the “flattening” or “smoothing” of a learning curve

A word or phrase that describes the process of making something more easily comprehensible. (I would actually like to exclude the 'learning curve' idiom) Examples; "How might we make this topic more ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

How do I use the verb confined correctly? [closed]

Example: "Intelligence is usually confined to the ability to process information fast." Is that a correct use of the verb confined?
0
votes
4answers
63 views

What can be a single word for a “valuable learning experience”.?

I am looking for a word or two that elegantly expresses the idea that the projects I did were a valuable learning experience. Here's the sentence: While I was doing my bachelor's I was a part of some ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

“effective and efficient estimation” or “accurate and efficient estimation”?

In math, we always need to derive some methods and strategies to estimate an unknown thing. For a good method, first it should get an estimation that is as accurate as possible, and second it should ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What does “to reason about” mean? [duplicate]

Recently I saw the following sentence: "I recently began using it on a side project and it has quickly proven itself to be a great way to create fast, dynamic user interfaces with code that’s easy to ...
7
votes
1answer
373 views

What does the phrase, “ninesigma worthy,” mean?

A person whom I met recently said something that I consider a bit odd. During our conversation, the topic of lost items arose. "Personally," he said, "I'm glad that over all the years I have not lost ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

“Is there anyone on the horizon?” What does it really mean?

It happened in a conversation between 2 girls? One girl think that the other one is freaking goregous and she was like "Is there anyone on the horizon?" And the other girl was like "I don't know. I ...
7
votes
1answer
895 views

Heard a native saying: “did you see where she had a baby??” refering to Facebook

I am Spanish and my fiancé is from the States. The other day we were hanging out with his mum and she said the following: "Did you see where Emma had a baby???" I was very confused because I hadn't ...
11
votes
11answers
2k views

How do I say that I am interested in a lot of things without coming off either as superficial or arrogant

For example: I like Math but also love History and am pretty good at sports. This is for my Statement of Purpose.
0
votes
3answers
70 views

What is a colloquial and figurative expression for the pieces of luggage you carry when travelling light

I am looking for a figurative or graphic expression to describe the minimal luggage content, fast to pack, or that you always have with you, without which you would feel less safe when travelling. The ...
1
vote
3answers
61 views

Someone who exploits your feelings for them to take advantage of you

I need a word or idiom for someone who takes advantage of you because they know you like them. In relationships, I heard the word "user", as someone who uses their romantic partners for material gain. ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

What is another phrase for one stop shop?

I am writing a small description and need a phrase to highlight a range of services. Is there another phrase for "one stop shop" which is both catchy and apt?
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Can I write “…argue it sufficiently…”?

in a scientific paper written in American English, I am using the following sentence: "...we would argue that it is sufficiently established that..." Can the sentence be shortened to "...we would ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What do “former” and “latter” refer to, here?

Here I am trying to peer into the meaning of this below paragraph (full version here).Being a non-native English speaker I am struggling in making sense, especially the bold part.The paragraph : ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

How to ask for the current token number of the person being served by customercare

In places like banks or other customer care centers, tokens are issued to people and based on the token number, one is served by customer care. At some places, there are automatic displays displaying ...
7
votes
7answers
2k views

Does “wobble” sound negative?

I'm launching a project which I want to make big as possible. I want to find a name, but I'm not looking for any real meanings. This project is a web tool (Javascript prototype & API) so I want to ...
-5
votes
1answer
74 views

Meaning of: “Therefore whether it were I or they” in scripture [closed]

In the following passage: Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand; by which also ye are saved, if ye keep in ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

How to say “As crucial as it is, it's surprising to…” [closed]

As a non-native English speaker, I'm trying to improve variety in my writing. For this particular, I want to express my feeling of surprise toward something that I always considered critical but ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

a thousandS years tradition

A thousands year old tradition "a thousand year old" tradition, would mean only a 1000 years, but I'm not sure we could use the plural form in this expression. I'm looking for an adjective that ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

“Are you a man or a mouse” phrase origin

Robert Burns associated the fates of mice and men in his poem "To a Mouse" (1785): The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, But this seems to suggest that mice and men have a ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

What is the meaning of the phrase: 'down the memory hole'?

I have heard the phrase 'down the memory hole' used before, and I believe it to have originated in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, but I'm not 100% sure the definition I've found is right: memory ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

Punctuation of the Expression “The Works”

I'm feeling really sick today, and I wanted to text my friend to tell him why I won't make it to our meeting. I wanted to say "I'm feeling pretty sick. Fever, headache, cough, the works.", but I've ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Parody of a Parody

I recently became aware of this video: What has the ECHR ever done for us Which, to me, is clearly a parody of this scene from Monty Python's Life of Brian - itself a Parody of the new testament. ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Term to describe when one event cannot occur without the other

So my wife and I were just having a conversation concerning a situation at her work, and I was trying to think of a term to describe the GM's approach but it's eluding me. Here's the context: ...
-1
votes
3answers
84 views

How to say “there is plenty of room for improvement.” in a more academic manner? [closed]

My last sentence in an academic assignment reads "Even in ........, there is plenty of room for improvement.", Is there anyway to say the same in a more academic manner? or is it acceptable as it is? ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Usage of Too… to

In school, I learned too... to... as an expression, like I am too tired to stand or It is too early to sleep. But sometimes I want to say something like I think 30 days on trip is good, it is not ...
2
votes
2answers
46 views

Go out into the world - The Tempest?

A few years ago, we studied the London Paralympics Opening Ceremony with our English teacher. The following words (spoken by Sir Ian McKellen if I remember well) are still echoing in my mind: ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

What does “weaker for it” mean?

What does "weaker for it" mean? Look at this context, for example: Those of us in the tourism sector have traditionally ignored this reality, and we are weaker for it. Thus, once the members of the ...
2
votes
3answers
65 views

How can something be “set in stone”?

Something could be carved in stone, or etched in stone. Or it could be set in concrete or set in mortar. But if someone asked me to set something in stone, I wouldn't know how to do it, since stone ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

My coworker and I were trying to solve a problem — we both tried two different things at once that only worked because of the other's attempt

Each solution to the problem we were trying to solve would have independently failed. We were each trying many different solutions at the same time. We each happened to try a solution that worked, but ...
7
votes
1answer
78 views

Origin of grandmother's expressions

My grandmother was born in the village of Lilley, Hertfordshire in the 1870s. She had two expressions which I have never heard anyone else use. When frustrated in place of a swear word she would ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Are “rent per day” and “rent per month” correct expressions?

Do determine the type of a suggestion in a real estate catalogue, besides "for sale", we must also denote real estate suggested to be rented on daily basis and on monthly basis. Is "per day" correct? ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

What is the correct expression? [closed]

I am trying not to laugh. Can I say,"I am trying to keep my laughter away?"
3
votes
3answers
56 views

How should I say an action or an institution is still needed and available?

I am looking for a good word or short phrase to communicate the fact that an action or an institution is needed, available, in common practice, meaningful, useful, and implemented. It should have ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

When a zombie groans “braaains”, what type of speech is this?

Is the zombie asking for brains? Demanding? It seems like a compulsion that they can't control, but is it an exclamation? A declaration of intent? How would you classify it?
3
votes
1answer
39 views

Use of “why” in spoken conversation

What's the exact term used to describe the "why" in some people's spoken English (somewhat rural or archaic by now, I suppose) as in "When I saw how much it cost, why, I knew I couldn't afford ...
9
votes
1answer
311 views

A swallow does not make a summer … or a spring?

The famous proverb, one swallow does not make a summer means: A single fortunate event doesn’t mean that what follows will also be good. (ODO) the origin, according to the Phrase ...
-1
votes
2answers
75 views

The expression “Call off” as a meaning of “Postpone” [closed]

As a synonym of "postpone", "call off" can be used. But, I can't understand why "call off" has a meaning of "postpone". Please tell me its origin.
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

In “ a picture of your memories ” Could this mean a picture that reminds you a happy moment in your life and makes you smile? [closed]

How can I make an expression with the least of words as the meaning above? I am a non-native speaker and having a trouble in writing in English. Please help me!
16
votes
8answers
2k views

Having done something so often, that it's all routine

I would like an expression that emphasizes that you've done something lots of times, that it's just routine to you. I thought "I've done it so many times, I can do it in my sleep" might work, ...
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

“You are on your knees” [closed]

I found the following English expression. WHy do you say "You are on your knees"? Is it because that your weight is ON your knees?
4
votes
3answers
142 views

Is there a term for the inability to find a word which is then substituted with a “funnier” word?

Take this sentence: "If people are lost when they start out, they usually just keep getting...loster." — from "Don't Make Me Think" Obviously "loster" isn't a word, but I see this turn ...