Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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56 views

Does “to be on the surface” mean to make something known to the public?

Can I use the expression "be on the surface" to mean that somebody finally makes himself known to the general public? For example They have been ignored so far by the public, but they are now ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Is there a generic expression for a “universal product”?

In Lucky Luke vol 38, some character named Doc Doxey tries to sell a product that works for almost everything (elixir) like a Swiss army knife with very general reported usage. Is there a name for ...
0
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2answers
31 views

to be a bit more together

Is this sentence grammatical? You'll have to be a bit more together when you have kids. .................................. Together : Being a 'together' person can mean having well-organised ideas, ...
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2answers
118 views
+50

Is this expression a well-established proverb or just a slight variation of a well-established one?

I'm referring to this one: Any man who is his own translator has a fool for an editor. The resemblance that this expression bears to the one about any individual who chooses to represent ...
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1answer
44 views

Is “eclectic combination” a pleonasm?

Doesn't the term eclectic also describe a mix/combination? Is it correct to use this expression?
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1answer
50 views

Do the following phrases mean the same? [closed]

Does "Topics created by Users" equal to "User created topics"?
1
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1answer
48 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
0
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1answer
43 views

What is the meaning of Poetic Justice

What is the real meaning of the expression Poetic Justice? My dictionary (WordWeb) does not give exact definitions of the work,can any provide me with a definition, an example and the context in ...
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0answers
26 views

Hookah is Alive/Dead [closed]

Is it OK to use Alive/dead to say Hookah is alive or dead meaning: (I’m/not) getting enough smoke. (not) getting thick smoke. (It) makes thick smoke. (It)doesn't make thick smoke. Hookah is/isn't ...
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2answers
42 views

what does “number one guy on a number two job” mean

I just heard today someone saying "I was a number one guy on a number two job". I did not get what that means exactly.
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3answers
64 views

If a character is boring and predictable, is he one-dimensional, or two-dimensional?

Let's suppose you have a character that's cliche, boring, and uninspired. Would you call the character one-dimensional, or two-dimensional? Both uses seem to make sense to me. For example, if a ...
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2answers
56 views

What is the origin of the phrase “trouble in paradise”?

Does anyone know where the phrase "trouble in paradise" comes from? The earliest usage I can find of the phrase is the title of the 1923 movie Trouble in Paradise, based on a Hungarian play called The ...
3
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7answers
594 views

A phrase or a word for not practising what you are preaching [closed]

Can you please tell me the word, term or phrase for not practising what you are preaching. Also, if possible, the word, term or phrase for someone who does so. I am not looking for hypocrisy or ...
2
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2answers
121 views

Why is the expression “bodily fluids” and not “body fluids”?

A Ph.d in anatomy asked me this question: Why is the expression "bodily fluids" and not "body fluids"?
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3answers
56 views

Expression denoting exclusivity

Can anyone think of an idiomatic expression in English to show how exclusive something is? What I'm looking for is an expression that will instantly communicate to a native English speaker that only ...
1
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3answers
43 views

idiom for unintended consequences

I am looking for a phrase/idiom that expresses the risk of unforeseen consequences of an action. Fake context: someone develops a treatment for cancer that is later found to cause Alzheimer's. So far, ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Trendy fashion phrases in press releases

How appropriate is it to use trendy fashion words in a press release? A fresh season truly requires a new wardrobe for the fashion-forward style setter. The surest bets? Stripes, lace, leather, ...
0
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2answers
53 views

What does the phrase “make up the cash” mean?

"A puts M as apprentice to B, and gives a guarantee to B for M's fidelity. B promises on his part that he will, at least once a month, see M make up the cash. B omits to see this done as promised, and ...
0
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2answers
55 views

“Online Chinese course” or “Chinese online course”?

I intend to teach Chinese online. But I was just wondering which course title would be appropriate and if there's any difference: Online Chinese course Chinese online course They sound a bit ...
14
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3answers
1k views

It's all downhill from here

The phrase "it was all downhill from there" seems to have two, contradictory meanings. The first indicates that things have since gotten a lot worse. For example (from ...
3
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2answers
698 views

Connotation of “sweety”

Here's the social set up. I'm talking to a girl on-line whom I've never met. After a few short messages I'm pointing out that she's not that devoted to the conversation and I'm suggesting that we go ...
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5answers
53 views

A sports team that has a consistent record of beating another one

I am looking for a word or a concise expression for a sports team A that over a period of time has a consistent record of beating a rival sports team B. It is not necessary that A are better than B. ...
5
votes
3answers
101 views

What is the origin and sense of the phrase “put up or shut up”?

In researching the recent EL&U question Origins and Interpretations of "Put your money where your mouth is", I repeatedly came across the seemingly related but older phrase “put up or ...
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3answers
115 views

Origins and meaning of “Put your money where your mouth is”

I heard this phrase uttered by a Canadian (from Vancouver) once; it left me in awe and elicited my curiosity. Wikipedia was not helpful. What is its origin? Is this expression used more in certain ...
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4answers
72 views

Term for Exaggeration, Used in Argument

Is there a term for the use of exaggeration or hyperbole, when it is used to the opposite effect of demeaning or minimizing? This often occurs in informal disagreements. For example, woman says, You ...
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2answers
301 views

Is there a “universal use” English equivalent of the Japanese ubiquitous greeting, “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu”?

I think some of you might have heard of the Japanese word, “Yoroshiku onegaishimas” - literally translated as “Please be nice to me” and its shortened form, “Yoroshiku.” “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu” or ...
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1answer
40 views

* times (adjective) than [duplicate]

I keep reading the phrase 10 times lighter than..... or similar. This quote is current: "Plastic containers are cheaper to make and 15 times lighter than glass ones, says Dairy Crest". This can not be ...
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2answers
132 views

“A healthy amount” of sugar… so… no sugar? =( [closed]

I've always heard and used the expression "a healthy amount" to mean "a lot". But as I stirred my coffee this morning, I realized that's exactly how I described the sugar that goes in my coffee, and ...
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0answers
21 views

Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...
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1answer
35 views

What is a self-contained, rhetoric phrase? (Brevity is soul of wit)

This related question touched on redundancy which appeared as a strict upgrade from an autological "word" to a "phrase" to me. It would be enlightening to find more instances that provokes a string ...
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2answers
41 views

What Does “easy on the” Mean in Food Preparation?

If I walk into a restaurant and order a sandwich that comes with lettuce, and say "easy on the lettuce", would that mean that I wanted no lettuce at all, or simply less than normally comes with the ...
0
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0answers
36 views

A word or term for extrapolation fallacy or using results beyond their context? [Solved]

I am looking for a word or term that means something like: you are using previous results outside boundaries of the original experiment/observation earlier experience/results does not apply in all ...
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4answers
88 views

Is there an antonym for the idiom “…remains to be seen” [closed]

I was using "...the truth remains to be seen" in a sentence when I realized I meant the opposite of this. I'm looking a phrase antithetical to this idiom, that follows the same (empirical) line of ...
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1answer
33 views

what is the expression to inform that i am having few questions?

What would be a nicer way to "i am having few questions about entering records"?
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2answers
164 views

How to express $1m in a formal document?

I'd like to say something like: I helped my company win a $1m deal with customer A. I'm not sure which one of the following is the best one for a formal document? e.g. in a resume: 1 million ...
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2answers
52 views

With passion for … or with a passion for

I am looking at the following sentence and can not understand whether I have to use a or not. I am a ... with [a] passion for ... . From my point of view passion is a noun and therefore it should ...
0
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2answers
56 views

A word that describes telling someone you are not going to tell them something but inadvertently telling them

For example: Me: So what do you do for a living? Guy: I'm a fish and game warden. Me: Interesting. Well I guess I better not tell you about all the salmon I caught yesterday. I was thinking ...
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10answers
1k views

Gaining a skill after some amount of time (while not actively practicing the skill)

This weekend I decided to master a song I recorded. The last time I spent time mastering a recording was well over a month ago. Before, I had no idea how to use an equalizer - I looked up a bunch of ...
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4answers
185 views

how to respond when boss says sorry to disturb you [closed]

My boss intentionally takes so much time talking about nothing and then says sorry to disturb you in a very sarcastic way. How should I respond to him?
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2answers
72 views

An alternative way of asking for the bill?

When asking for the bill in a restaurant/diner, besides the common "Could I have the bill [/check for US English], please" can I say something like: "Could you close me out, please?" I saw that in a ...
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0answers
42 views

Way to ask interviewer (/speaking examiner) to repeat slowly its question [duplicate]

The accent of a speaking examiner is sometimes difficult to understand completely. Asking him to repeat his question is a delicate action that should be handled correctly, in my consideration. ...
1
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1answer
116 views

saying thanks to someone answering your email ASAP who is important for you [closed]

Which of these sentences sounds more american? and which sounds more polite against who is important for you like a professor or boss? first: Thanks for your prompt response second: Thanks ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

“Rule the Roast” and “Rule the Roost”

John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms (2009) has this entry for "rule the roost": rule the roost be in complete control The original expression was rule the roast, which was common ...
25
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9answers
5k views

What is a polite way of talking about a recently-deceased person?

In my language (Arabic), we say things that can be translated to: Mr X, God have mercy on him, was .. Mr X, God puts him in heaven, was. . . . Mr X, God forgive him, was. . . . How does one talk ...
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2answers
30 views

What is a better way of saying the following- [closed]

I want to express "... our beliefs which are not necessarily true or rational affect of our perception ..." in a better way.
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2answers
62 views

“As I go” expression

Could anyone please tell me what "as I go" means? Like in the following context: I will fill it out as I go.
0
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1answer
62 views

“largest of any mammal” vs. “largest of all mammals”

A: This animal is the largest of any mammal. vs. B: This animal is the largest of all mammals. What are the subtle differences between A and B?
1
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3answers
54 views

Is it correct to talk about a “lost age”? [closed]

Is it correct to talk about a "lost age"? In the sense of a long gone era, or a time where an extinct civilization was living for example. Edit : I will not use this expression as part of a sentence ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Why not “virtual estate” instead of “screen real estate”?

In English usage in many disciplines, like articles on Web designing, people frequently use the word "screen real estate" or "viewport (browser window size) real estate" or even "mobile or browser ...
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1answer
34 views

Gotta equivalents

I have done a bad classification of the oral use of these expressions. Been the most used 1 and the less 5. What is the most used in spoken American English? I gotta I got to I've gotta I've got ...