Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (5)

5
votes
4answers
88 views

What term or phrase could be used to describe everything that is necessary for a successful product, except for the product itself?

I work for a company that manufactures and sells vehicles. When we talk about a product, we are talking about the vehicle itself; the physical object that the customer will own. In order to sell ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Phrase Synonymous to “Stop at nothing?”

I'm writing a paper describing a fashion designer who creates incredibly complex and EXTRAVAGANT sets for his runway shows. I want to say he "stops at nothing" or "spares no effort" or "leaves no ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Abbreviation for “no size” (clothing)

In Spanish, when you buy some types of complementary articles of clothing you say that article has no size (sin talla). This can be shortened as "s/t"; a well-known abbreviation in Spanish (at least ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

A word for how much of a sales target has been acomplished

Imagine the user interface of a sales commission management system. You have clearly labeled Goal showing the amount in sales the sales representative has to sell in order to reach it. Then there is ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

What's going on with the word “fail” in “without fail?”

Calling something "a fail" has bothered me as it becomes more commonplace, until one day the phrase "without fail" occurred to me as an example of an established niche usage of "fail" as a noun. I'm ...
3
votes
2answers
77 views

Saying for “don't talk about things you don't understand”

Is there a (relatively) common phrase, preferably using a metaphor, which means one should not talk about things one does not really understand? I have the impression of some such phrase floating ...
6
votes
1answer
104 views

“Amiable sex” meaning?

Certain it is, that he was a great favorite among all the good wives of the village, who, as usual, with the amiable sex, took his part in all family squabbles; and never failed, whenever they ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views
2
votes
2answers
54 views

How should I interpret 'come evening' in this long sentence?

How should I interpret come evening in this long sentence? This ensures that, come evening, you've remembered whether or not you followed through in the morning. This is a new grammar that I ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Has anyone heard the expression, to stack on a turn? [closed]

Has anyone heard the saying, to stack on a turn?
0
votes
0answers
35 views

`average' for specific time duration

I'd like to represent the average performance of some technical method in a table. The performances were measured every hour from 2PM to 11PM. In my report, the average of those measurements will be ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Came “into” fruition?

My friend wrote some copy, explaining that her "company came into fruition because she realized the opportunity..." I've never used "came into fruition" -- only "came to fruition". Is "came into ...
5
votes
1answer
73 views

Who coined the term “baseball diplomacy” (and when)?

President Obama's recent visit to Cuba has prompted some news sources to dust off the term "baseball diplomacy" (one example here). According to a paper I found on the topic, "the ... term ...
6
votes
9answers
338 views

Idiom or Expression related to Nepotism

I'm looking for an idiom or expression that relates to someone who is promoted to get them out of a department because they can't be fired due to politics, possibly nepotism. The promotion is not ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

What is an appropriate expression/idiom for “adding argument/point to a discussion”

I am searching for an expression/idiom describing a situation of adding an argument or a valid point to a heated discussion. For example: I have read an article about something that relates to a ...
3
votes
3answers
90 views

Word or Phrase for Smart and Difficult to work with [closed]

A coworker and I are having a discussion about a very smart person we work with who is also very difficult to deal with. We both feel like there is a word or phrase out there to describe this type ...
7
votes
10answers
1k views

Colorful idiom/phrase equivalent to French “s'en fourrer jusque là/plein la panse”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that comes anywhere close in flavor to the colorful French expression, s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) jusque là s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) ...
-1
votes
2answers
45 views

“be so kind to to sg” [closed]

I would like to ask somebody politely to accept an invitation. Which is the correct form "please be so kind to accept it" or "be so kind and accept it"
2
votes
1answer
51 views

“I want this so bad I'll do anything for it!”

When someone says this, we know he obviously doesn't mean he'll "do anything". In this case, what kind of statement is this? It isn't a literal statement too, right?
2
votes
3answers
125 views

Colorful English equivalent for the French expression “mine de capitaine”

Is there a colorful expression in English which equates to the French [avoir] une mine de capitaine? (Literally, to sport skipper's [glowing, healthy] looks) It is something that we say to someone ...
-2
votes
1answer
66 views

What is the right way to say: “I like this author's writing style” [closed]

I am not a native English speaker and have a difficult time putting this idea into one sentence. I read one research paper and I really enjoy his writing style. How can I say that in one sentence? ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

The word noggin [duplicate]

Where did the word "noggin" originate? My daughter was talking to her friend and the expression "your noggin" was used. Then one had asked the other, "where did that phrase come from originally?"
1
vote
3answers
52 views

Simple representation for “under the condition that”

I'm writing a academic paper, and would like to represent "under the condition that" more simply. In (very redundant) representation, what I'd like to say is: We determined the observation points ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Difference between “wants to be you” and “wants to become you”

I've been watching the latest season of House of Cards and in the latest episode I saw there is a line that I think is supposed to convey an image, but I can't quite understand it. It is about the US ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

How to reformulate 'honor the data'

I have written sentence like this The resulting property models from cooperative inversion honor the geophysical data My Professor wants me to reformulate the sentence, in particular he raised a ...
7
votes
4answers
258 views

Is “Never mind” a phrasal verb?

When we say "never mind that" to mean disregard or don't worry about, is it a verb altogether (a phrasal verb) or is "mind" the verb that's modified by the adverb never? Examples: Never mind what he ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

What is the meaning when someone say “it doesn't get much weird than Lynda?”

Lynda made a dance performance, it's very weird and many audiences couldn't understand it. Then a guy made a comment "It doesn't get much weird than Lynda?". What does he mean ? Is that "Lynda is ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Movement of fingers expressing shyness

What is name of the action for when your fingers "caress" one another because you're shy?
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Conjunction And to express one idea

Please take a look at this sentence: There is a philosophical question and an issue of humanity "what are aliens?". In this one, I want to express "philosophical question"(a) and "issue of ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

“Set of the day” and “this is my line” [closed]

For those who watched Point Break , I fished out two idioms I haven't met before. The set of the day. Context: two guys are surfing, one of them points out a big wave and says: 'It is the set ...
1
vote
3answers
82 views

What is the significance of “single” in “single greatest” (or similar)?

People always say "The single greatest ...". But I think "The greatest ..." is also correct. Is the latter correct? If yes, what's the significance of adding "single"? By definition "greatest" is ...
-1
votes
2answers
84 views

Is there a word to describe when someone has super-sensitive hearing?

What word or phrase could be used to accurately describe when someone has excellent or super-sensitive hearing far beyond that of most people, where they might have, for example: the ability to hear ...
6
votes
3answers
94 views

Why does “fair” mean “quite big”?

Fair is a word that suggests the idea of something right, proper, correct or reasonable, but in the following case it has a different connotation: Fair - (adjective): (before noun) ​quite ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

“The next thing we know” usage in warnings

I'm aware of that phrase "The next thing I(we) know" could be used to describe "blank periods in memory" or something that happends out of a sudden, for example: We all heard this weird noise, ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

what is an Irish greeting to be said to someone in the evening?

Is there an alternative phrase for greeting someone in the evening a la Top of the morning to you?
-3
votes
1answer
62 views

Can the verb “let” take an adjective as an object complement like to “leave”?

I was watching "Good Wife Season 7, Episode 16". Alicia was having a private time with her new boyfriend and her mother visited her daughter's house without prior notice. Alicia tried to hide him in ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Can I use “apply” in sense of “contact”?

It’s a classifieds app. Is it correct to use "brokers may apply"/"brokers may not apply" in sense of contacting? I mean does a broker apply when calling/emailing you to buy/rent your house, or is it ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Alternative to “Overreaching her mandate” for non-elected people

The way I see it, 'overreaching his mandate' is used when someone elected to a position or answering to someone else does things that are 'out of line' (negative connotation) for him. There is an ...
4
votes
1answer
95 views

History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

History of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' [closed]

Anyone know the history of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' I imagine it comes from the wording 'Political Wonk' which I've heard of in the past but I'm not sure if it's a positive expression, neutral, ...
-1
votes
2answers
48 views

What is the difference between “As per” and “As for”? [closed]

What is the difference between "As per" and "As for"? As for our professional services or as per our professional services?
1
vote
5answers
92 views

Looking for an English equivalent to the relatively new French word “bientraitance,” which means the act or practice of treating (someone/people) well [closed]

The French have coined a new term "bientraitance" which is a noun that means "treating people well" or "treating people respectfully or properly." I don't think there is an English equivalent (doesn't ...
18
votes
11answers
3k views

Are there any similar phrases that are popular in the US to express “penny dropped”?

I met the phrase penny dropped today and learned that it is mainly used in UK. The Cambridge Idioms Dictionary via TheFreeDictionary.com defines it as if you say the penny drops, you mean that ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

What is the exact definition of the expression 'A Rat's Chance'? [closed]

I started to learn English. Watching series like popular 'The X-Files' etc is very useful. In the 6th episode of the 10th season I found the expression 'A rat's chance'. What does it mean?
1
vote
0answers
81 views

I need help with the usage of “as he would say”. Should there be a period after penny and should “T” be capital in “The day”? [closed]

Another significant person who played a major role in redefining the word perseverance was my instructor from Ducat. “Spend a single day without your parent’s financial support and try to earn ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Does “there's more to come” require a past tense after it? [closed]

I wrote the following phrase: There's more to come once this pull request get merged (a pull request is something that can be merged) I saw on various places people using There's more to come ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Is the expression “to get understood” correct?

Can I say Get yourself understood. with the sense of "make yourself understood"? Are both correct? Is there a difference in meaning between the two?
1
vote
2answers
116 views

How to tell someone (in a funny way) that you are aware that you are (too) emotive while talking about an issue?

How would you tell (briefly) the person you are talking with when you are flooded with emotions —in a funny way—, that: you are aware of these sign, and you find it embarrassing you don’t take your ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
1
vote
3answers
84 views

forget or forget about?

Apart from the difference between forget it and forget about it, what do you forget and what do you forget about? Do you forget a face, someone's birthday or your date who is waiting for you? Do ...