0
votes
2answers
58 views

A simple question about syntax [on hold]

I guess this would be a pretty simple question to answer. Is this sentence correct: The player appears to have not connected. I am having my doubts about the appears to have not part. P.S.: Not ...
0
votes
2answers
212 views

Reserve or book tickets?

In an app I am writing the user can book/reserve tickets for riding a bus. Which of the following terms does fit this process best? 'Reserve Tickets' or 'Book Tickets' Also, in some cases the user ...
0
votes
1answer
258 views

Can I use verb “to ride” referring to a car?

If I'm behind the wheel, "I'm driving". But if I am in the back seat or the passenger front seat what am I doing? Am I riding in the car?" "I rode 20 miles." (My Dad was the driver.) "We are riding ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

How to correctly express an intention to work on a certain day instead of working on another day?

How to say "I will work on Saturday instead of working on Tuesday" in a more natural fashion? I guess the verb will be constructed like "work or make" + "out or off or ?", but what is the exact ...
1
vote
1answer
201 views

Why “Daddy” in this sentence was written with a capital D?

Why is Daddy in this sentence written with a capital D? Her love letters to and from Daddy were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs. This sentence is from ...
3
votes
2answers
511 views

Where did the expression “achievement unlocked” come from?

Why achievement is unlocked? Achievement is not a lock, door or safe. You don't get anything after unlocking. I have an assumption that it came from gaming history, word "unlocked" just transferred ...
-2
votes
1answer
543 views

replacement for expression “there are.” [duplicate]

So my writing teacher hates the expression "there are" in essays. Does anybody know some good substitutes for this overused expression? Thanx ya'll, much appreciated!
-1
votes
3answers
377 views

“X equals Y” vs. “X is equal to Y”

What's the subtle difference between X equals Y and X is equal to Y?
5
votes
2answers
905 views

“Trawling through” or “trolling through”

There are quite a few discussions online about whether one can "trawl through" or "troll through", looking for something. From what I can see, both are fishing terms so both are legitimate in ...
0
votes
3answers
241 views

What is the suitable preposition which come after the verb “hassle”?

Should we say, A hassles with B or A hassles to B? What is the right expression?
1
vote
1answer
117 views

On the interpretation of “walked to the station at 9 o'clock” [closed]

I want to confirm what a book says. It says: I went to the station at 9 o'clock. I walked to the station at 9 o'clock. Sentence (1) has the following two meaning: a. I left for the station at 9 ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
1
vote
2answers
312 views

Usage of the expression “go they went”

I noticed the usage of go they went in the TV show How I Met Your Mother: Marshall: Where are all my underpants? Lily: Did you check your suitcase? (Marshall checks his suitcase, gives a ...
19
votes
10answers
7k views

What's the verb for making that “pffft” sound?

I have a dialogue like this: "All I wanted to do was to keep a low profile" "Pffft. That worked well, we not only have the entire police force but also the entire mafia chasing us" I don't ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Meaning of “to believe the impossible”

Does to believe the impossible mean to believe that everything is possible to believe that something seemingly impossible is actually possible something else?
4
votes
3answers
431 views

How did the phenomenon of doubling words come about?

I am referring to phrases such as: "Do you like her, or do you like like her." Can someone provide an explanation of this? There are many more examples but none come to mind at the moment.
3
votes
4answers
2k views

What does “to bleed something” mean?

In Bloomberg magazine, I saw this sentence: Rust Belt states that have bled manufacturing jobs. Does it mean they have lost the jobs or gained more jobs?