-1
votes
0answers
26 views

'Given by' vs 'Given with'

Is this sentence correct? The equation of a line is given with [SOME EQUATION] ... I want to use it instead of: The equation of a line is given by [SOME EQUATION] ... Can I use 'with' ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“At the service of” versus “in the service of”

In doing a translation on duolingo, another translator had translated a phrase to say "at the service of X". I edited this to "in the service of X" and left a comment that as a native speaker, hearing ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

“Something to the rescue!” vs “Something for the rescue” — which one is correct?

I was wondering which one of the following constructions below is grammatically correct? Or both are acceptable? Something to the rescue! Something for the rescue!
0
votes
0answers
38 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
2
votes
2answers
201 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

work 'at' the weekends or work 'during' the weekends? [closed]

I wrote "Many college students work at the weekends." My colleague changed 'at' to 'during' = Many college students work during the weekends. Do you feel there is a difference, however subtle?
0
votes
2answers
109 views

To or For? What's the rule? [closed]

As an ESL learner I always mess up using prepositions. It’s been especially difficult to understand when to use to or for. Are there any rules about this usage?
2
votes
1answer
119 views

The meaning of “reserve of living”

What might be the meaning of the phrase "reserve of living" The quotation comes from Maeve Gilmore's, A World Away. How foreign to the spirit's early beauty And to the amoral integrity of the ...
1
vote
2answers
171 views

Is “at” or “of” unnecessary in “people his parents’ age”?

There was the following sentence in Maureen Dawd's article introducing a Denber couple who are catering to marijuana tourists at their inn under the headline, “Now playing in Denver: Reefer Gladness” ...
0
votes
1answer
337 views

“Staying at my aunt's place” or “staying with my aunt”?

Are both of these sentences correct? Is there any difference in meaning between them? "I'm staying with my aunt." or "I'm staying at my aunt's." What I mean is "remain at her place temporarily." ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

When is 'over and above' used?

When is the expression 'over and above' used instead of just 'over' or just 'above'?
1
vote
3answers
643 views

Is the usage “off for lunch” correct?

Is the usage (someone) is off for lunch correct? I think the above usage is right but I am not pretty sure. Related question
2
votes
2answers
507 views

Why are you “On a train” yet “In a car” when you are inside both vehicles? [duplicate]

Why are you "On a train" yet "In a car" when you are inside both vehicles? "On a bike" makes sense but "On a plane" seems wrong as you are actually inside the plane rather than on it.
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it “moved into” or “moved in to”?

I suppose I am confused in general about the use of "into" versus "in to." For this case, though, consider the sentence, "I moved into my apartment today" as opposed to "I moved in to my apartment ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Preposition after “Good luck”.

I have seen different preposition after "Good luck". Example: Good luck on/with/for your new job Could you explain the possible differences of usage or meaning. Thank you.
0
votes
3answers
272 views

What is the suitable preposition which come after the verb “hassle”?

Should we say, A hassles with B or A hassles to B? What is the right expression?
0
votes
3answers
713 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What are “up” and “down” in “up there” and “down there”?

"Up there" and "down there" are two of the most frequent expressions that I, myself, use often. I really don't know whether they are just expressions used to refer to a place to go ("I went down ...
1
vote
5answers
143 views

“stars on heaven” vs “stars in heaven” [closed]

Which expression is correct? stars in heaven or stars on heaven I want to express that something comes in really, really large numbers. For instance: "There are more Blabla than stars ...
4
votes
3answers
743 views

“Agreed” or “agreed to”

Should agreed or agreed to be used in the example below? The member countries agreed the bailout package for the sovereign. NATO will enforce the sanctions agreed in May. The member ...
2
votes
2answers
391 views

Can I say “medium-term”, as with the adjectives “short-term” and “long-term”? Do they need prepositions?

I would like to use an adjective to express something in between the two adjectives short-term and long-term. Does medium-term make sense here? What is the adjective I can use? What preposition, if ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

“In this year” versus “this year”

"In this year": Can anyone argue that the preposition in is unnecessary here, maybe even a hypercorrection? (Are there any situations where in is necessary?) Edits Some examples: How many days are ...
1
vote
3answers
225 views

“excursion over city” vs “excursion around city”

Is there any difference in phrases usage? Which one is better for title of a story? The story is about tourists.
9
votes
3answers
19k views

“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
1
vote
3answers
455 views

Why not concatenate two frequently used words into a new one?

I will probably get a lot of flak about this, but why not combine the often used together words "with the" into "withe" which is pronounced similarly, and it much shorter and easier to write? I am ...
4
votes
2answers
723 views

“To increase competitiveness in” or “to increase competitiveness on”?

Which phrase is the correct one? to increase competitiveness in the EU labor market to increase competitiveness on the EU labor market