1
vote
2answers
35 views

Is the term “fresh and original” redundant?

I see this phrase all over the place. Fresh in this usage appears to be in the usage: not previously known or used; new or different. And directly lists original as a synonym. And original in ...
0
votes
3answers
38 views

What is another way to say the need for?

What is another way to say "the need for" in regards to mental health system reform
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Do these phrases have any sense? [on hold]

To besmirch the honor of mr. Johnson. When we compare mr. Johnson with mr. Jackson, we disrespect the latter one (is it understandable that 'the latter one' refers to mr. Jackson?).
5
votes
4answers
181 views
+200

Origin of the phrase “mother's ruin”?

I was under the impression that the phrase "mother's ruin" came from the England in the 1800's, where many people living in London did so in absolute poverty, and gin (the so-called "mother's ruin") ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

to be above board

I have made 2-year apprenticeship as a multilingual correspondent. One expression that I came across but is still unclear to me is: "to be above board" or "He is above board" I have looked it up on ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Is there more than a 'double' whammy?

I have three (could grow to be more) bad reasons for a situation and I wondered if there is such a thing as a triple whammy that is an extension of the double whammy. From my research online, a triple ...
0
votes
3answers
58 views

A more formal way of saying “pointing out”

The goal of an edge detection algorithm is identifying pixels that belong to an edge of an object in an image ... The rest of the sentence should say something along the lines of "and point ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Bora Bora, Here We Come

Saw this phrase/expression in CIBC advertisement. The pleased client asked, "should we re-investment or expand", and the bank clerk said, "you can do both", then the old lady in the back happily ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

What does “it's all on you” mean?

I just wonder if "It is on you" can mean "It is because of you". This phrase is from Tony Stark in The Avengers, 2012 film. Common and natural saying in English-speaking countries?
3
votes
5answers
86 views

Is this the opposite of 'making a virtue out of a necessity'?

We all know what it means to 'make a virtue out of a necessity'. The only bananas on offer at the supermarket are 'fair trade', so we buy them and then pretend to ourselves and others that we have ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Flattering vs. flatter [closed]

Of two sentences You are flattering me. You flatter me. Which is correct? Are both correct, or is one better than the other?
0
votes
3answers
60 views

Do “getting into…” and “getting interested in…” mean the same?

How did you get into it? How did you get interested in it? Do the examples above mean the same?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“a change in …” vs “a change to …”, any difference? [closed]

Is there any difference between "a change in something" and "a change to something"? Is that like the former one is a more objective description while the latter one emphasizes the result of a ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

How to express the trend in this graph using the appropriate phrases?

I have this graph and I want to describe the difference in the take off trajectory of two patterns in the figure below. The first pattern is seen in the first two parameters over the years from the ...
0
votes
3answers
82 views

What is the opposite of 'a false dawn'

What is the opposite of a false dawn, a false dawn being "a promising situation which comes to nothing". The sentence I'm thinking of would be something like: They started off well and it was not a ...
-1
votes
2answers
78 views

High level saying of the sentence “I don't just work for timepass”

Basically, I want to tell my superiors that whatever work I perform, I do it to the fullest and I do it efficiently. So I want to express the sentence: I dont work forcibly and for time pass. I ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How to compare between two incomparable things, yet similar in some aspects?

I want to compare between results seen in healthy cells and in tumor cells. The same finding was seen in both types of cells. I know that this is not like apples-to-apples comparison, but still both ...
1
vote
3answers
62 views

What's the best way to say: “Brands who trust our work”

What's the best way to say: "Brands who trust our work" or "Brands that trust in our work"?
0
votes
3answers
66 views

Using I hope in professional environment [closed]

I need to state that my goal is to answer some answers. Starting my e-mail with the "I hope..." does not sound professional. Any alternatives you can provide me with?
0
votes
2answers
109 views

Please explain the meaning of the word “distance” in the sentence

Distance sometimes lets you know who's worth keeping and who's worth letting go Unless the distance is playing games with the vision and its all a mirage, a vagueness of a dream
2
votes
2answers
160 views

Origin of the phrase “on the wrong side of history”

I've been hearing the phrase "on the wrong side of history" a lot lately, most recently today when President Obama said that Russia was on "the wrong side of history" for its actions in Ukraine. ...
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

What does “can be said to do / to be” something mean?

The various modern revolutions in physics, in psychology, in politics, even in literary style, have not escaped his intelligent notice, but they can scarcely be said to have influenced him deeply. ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Swapping Words in 'Deep' Sayings

Here's an example of a common swapping that happens when people want to sound profound: The clothes don't make the man It's the man that makes the clothes What is this form of swapping called?
19
votes
11answers
2k views

[S]he has the ears of a …?

Often, when overheard from far away, I find myself saying/thinking: [S]he has the ears of a hawk! Which doesn't really make sense as hawks aren't particularly well known for their sense of ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Idioms or phrases for “Be it good or bad”

Can you suggest some idioms or phrases for Be it good or bad? For example: Be it good or bad, television has become an indispensable part of our lives.
0
votes
3answers
99 views

Need native expressions for “something happened but no one wants to undertake the responsibility”

Are there native expressions in oral and formal writing English about something happened - mostly negative incidents or events, but those, who should be responsible for it , don't want to undertake ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Alternative phrasing to “getting work done”

I find myself using the phrase "I need to get some work done" in a misleading way. At any given time, I'm working on projects for my employer, projects as a podcaster, projects at my home or just ...
0
votes
3answers
107 views

A title or descriptive phrase for someone who likes to share

I'm building a mobile app that has a series of achievements that may be awarded based on the users interaction. The app itself is an easter egg hunt. One of the achievements is for sharing (via ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

“Find out about my solutions”

"Come visit me to find out about the solutions" find out about sounds weird to me: what are some synonyms to better express the concept?
4
votes
10answers
750 views

What is another way of saying “final solution?”

"Final Solution" is not the optimal phrase to use because it has a negative historical reference. When working on a project, I'd like to find a phrase that describes the process of evolving solutions ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

As it did - meaning and usage

I found this interesting topics being discussed here. I also had some time back asked similar questions in the other forum. Here is the sentence - Although his (Nirmal) detainment (in prison) ...
2
votes
2answers
166 views

“Would agree” vs “would have agreed”

Did I really believe she would agree? and Did I really believe she would have agreed? What's the difference between the two? Is one more common/grammatically correct than the other?
1
vote
2answers
53 views

“cleared from” vs “cleared up from” vs “cleared away from”

I always have problem deciding which one to use. Example: After understanding that, the darkness finally [...] from my eyes. Should I use cleared from, cleared up from, or cleared away from?
0
votes
2answers
56 views

What's the meaning of “should we be interested”?

I contacted someone and he replied: ... I've passed your information along and someone will get back to you should we be interested. After sending him another message he replied: ... ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Reserve or book tickets?

In an app I am writing the user can book/reserve tickets for riding a bus. Which of the following terms does fit this process best? 'Reserve Tickets' or 'Book Tickets' Also, in some cases the user ...
1
vote
2answers
124 views

“I, for one, don't know ”

I am curious about the precise meaning of for one in the expression "I, for one, don't know." This came up in a discussion about the amount of social efforts society should be willing to put in ...
2
votes
2answers
120 views

“At the least” to start a sentence seems right but

The sentence I am trying to construct will be read with the assumption that finding that a bug exists in unfortunate. This is what I want to say, paraphrased: We found a bug in the code. At the ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

' when we hold': usage

The daily judge assignments are posted on the Clerk of Court site – see side bar. I have an attorney going tomorrow to research the records for the name of the judge responsible on February 5 ...
1
vote
3answers
88 views

Can I say “I have been nourishing my passions”?

Can I say "I have been nourishing my passions"? Or something similar to express the figurative fact that "I have been developing and nourishing them"?
3
votes
1answer
110 views

'Complete a confusion' — expression or confusion?

Is complete someone's confusion a popular expression that makes sense? This expression pops up so often I wonder I am missing something here. Does complete here mean to 'resolve'/ 'clarify'? ...
0
votes
2answers
134 views

How did the phrase “hear you out” or “hear me out” come about?

How did the phrase "hear you out" or "hear me out" come about? The phrase means "listen to whatever I have to say before you pass judgment on me," or "tell me whatever you want; I don't mind and ...
4
votes
2answers
238 views

What is the context in which 'ice breaking' is a good thing?

If you are on a frozen lake and the ice breaks you basically plunge into cold water. That could end badly. What is the explanation for 'getting to know everyone', or 'getting the conversation ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

A word that refers to a previously mentioned action [closed]

I am trying to refer back to the action "act swiftly" mentioned previously, but I am not sure if I am in the right direction. I thought of a few possible solutions as follows. An entire rephrasing of ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Agenda going from bold to bite-sized

What does "one's agenda going from bold to bite-sized" mean?
1
vote
2answers
157 views

Meaning of “run flat out”

What does "I can run flat out for a half mile before my hands start shaking" mean? It was said in The Bourne Identity. I am not a native English speaker. I know the meaning of the individual words, ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

The elephant in the room

Where does the phrase "The elephant in the room" come from ? Why an elephant ? If it has to mean something big why not "the whale in the room" ? If it has to be something that needs urgent attention ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Can I use “let … alone” to mean “even though/if”? [closed]

I am composing a poem and have something like this Even if/though it is thousand miles far, we can still share the one. in mind, which I want to express it more poetically as Let thousand ...
2
votes
2answers
112 views

“To Cut Stick” Origin

I am reading Uncle Tom's Cabin. When Eliza realizes she and her son will be split up by a business deal, she runs away with him during the night. In the ensuing commotion the next morning, a boy named ...
0
votes
1answer
264 views

“The next big thing” phrase

Is the phrase "The next big thing" considered a formal or a slang phrase? Especially when communicating with a professional committee.
1
vote
3answers
140 views

Is “Neither I you” Correct?

A friend of mine said "...I never saw you during school." For some reason I wanted to respond "Neither I you." I am certain I have heard this reply before, but, looking at it now, it does not seem ...