1
vote
1answer
77 views

What is the difference between “here goes” and “here it goes”?

I’m wondering what the difference between here goes and here it goes is. When something is going down and I want to express my feeling of “I’ll make it!”, which expression is correct? For example, ...
-1
votes
2answers
43 views

'Marked by' vs 'having' in dictionary definitions

I've read definitions that differ from each other only by the words marked by and having. E.g. 'Marked by a calm demeanor' and 'having a calm demeanor'. I see this often enough that I suspect ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“On a side note” vs. “by the way”

What's the difference between "on a side note" and "by the way"? Is one of them restricted to certain situations while the other is not?
5
votes
2answers
901 views

“Trawling through” or “trolling through”

There are quite a few discussions online about whether one can "trawl through" or "troll through", looking for something. From what I can see, both are fishing terms so both are legitimate in ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“Would have” and “would have no”

Could you describe about "would have ~ed" & "would have not ~ed". I know would has the several meanings. But when I was talking with one of my friend who is a native speaker and in this following ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“in ages” vs “for ages”

I've always thought I should use "for ages" when, for example, I meet a person who I haven't seen for a long time, but recently I came across another expression, "in ages," as in "I haven't seen you ...
0
votes
1answer
335 views

Under which cases should an article (a/an/the) not be used? [duplicate]

The current machine has been repaired. Current machine has been repaired. Which is more natural? What are the subtle differences between them? Under which cases should an article ...
1
vote
2answers
200 views

“number of books” or “book count”?

The number of books is nine. The book count is nine. Which is more natural? What's the SUBTLE difference between them?
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“integer multiple” vs. “integral multiple”

Nine is an integer multiple of three. Nine is an integral multiple of three. Which is more common? If both are accepted, what's the subtle difference between them?
-1
votes
1answer
950 views

What is the difference between “As far as” and “As much as”? [closed]

What is the difference, for example, between "As far as I know" and "As much as I know"?
4
votes
1answer
3k views

“How did you know?” vs. “how do you know?” distinction

When someone makes an assertion, the distinction between "how did you know" and "how do you know" seems to be that "how did you know" implies that the person in question is correct in their assertion. ...
2
votes
2answers
348 views

“Hitler will send no warning” vs “Hitler won't send warnings”

As in this WWII poster: Are they the same thing, or are there differences in expression? Why do native speakers choose the first one?
0
votes
3answers
292 views

“in a word” vs “in a sentence”

In a word, you are wrong! In a sentence, you are wrong! Which is more natural? I feel "in a word" is more common than "in a sentence", but "you are wrong!" consists of three words rather ...
0
votes
3answers
560 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “That would be great” conveying a touch of unwillingness? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I use “will” or “would” when I suggest that something will/would come in handy? For example: Tom: Hey, will you be free tomorrow night to catch a movie ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“rather than” vs “as opposed to” [closed]

We do not know whether X will have an effect on element Y as opposed to others. We do not know whether X will have an effect on element Y rather than on others. The first version is the first ...
-1
votes
3answers
614 views

Semantic difference between “if I did not want” and “if I wanted”

I was reading My Antonia and came across this line: [She] asked me if I did not want to go to the garden with her (12) And was wondering why Cather chose if I did not want over if I wanted. Are ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“to what extent” vs. “to what level” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “to a degree” vs. “to an extent” What's the difference between "to what extent" and "to what level"? Please support your answer with examples.
7
votes
5answers
30k views

“For the time being” vs. “for now”

Consider the following passages: A litter made of two rifles and two field jackets would suffice for now. That was good news; another bit was that the EPW was a lieutenant, a regimental REMF ...
1
vote
2answers
400 views

Take my photo, take a photo of me

Please tell me, is there any difference when saying take his photo and take a photo of him? To me, the first one sounds awkward.
1
vote
2answers
826 views

“Don't know what the name is” vs. “Don't know what it's called”

What is the difference between saying: A: Which meal do you want, Sir? B: Number 4. I don't know what the name is. A: Which meal do you want, Sir? B: Number 4. I don't know what it's ...
2
votes
3answers
12k views

“I think …” or “In my opinion…” or “From my point of view…”

If I want to express my opinion about something, what's the most correct form? What are the differences? What is more formal and what more colloquial? For example, in Italian, nobody says In my ...
3
votes
1answer
230 views

“Vacation days” or “days off”

What is the right expression: vacation days or days off?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“tailored towards” or “tailored to”?

Which one would you prefer, in particular in combination with "the needs"? Google finds a lot more for "tailored to" (30 millions) than for "tailored towards" (only 600 thousands).
11
votes
3answers
19k views

Difference between phrase, idiom and expression [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between an expression and a phrase? Difference between “phrase” and “idiom” What is the difference between a phrase, an ...
3
votes
6answers
4k views

What is the difference between a marque and a brand?

What is the difference between a marque and a brand? For example, why would one use the expression "car marques" instead of "car brands"?
0
votes
2answers
265 views

Is the phrase “Traffic Revision” generally used to describe temporary or permanent changes of traffic flow?

When I first moved to Washington state, I would see mystifying traffic warning signs that would announce "Traffic Revision Ahead" as I was driving and then be in the midst of roadwork and lane changes ...
0
votes
1answer
480 views

Difference between “how you want” and “how you will”

Is there any difference in meaning betweeen these two? Is one a valid grammar construct and the other not?
5
votes
3answers
12k views

“much of the time” vs “most of the time”

Are these two phrases different in meaning? When do you use "much" or "most"? I was reading a book named "The world of words" where I saw this sentence Substitution in context will help you much ...