Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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2
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2answers
15 views

Where does the expression “get in her/his pants” come from?

Did people in the past wear super loose pants that could fit 2 people in there or something? Didn't people back then remove their pants before doing it? Did they have some sort of ritual where they ...
1
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1answer
16 views

“How accurate” vs “How accurately”

Which one is right? We use our algorithm to evaluate how accurately it is possible to model protein structures with dihedral angles. or We use our algorithm to evaluate how accurate it is ...
-1
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0answers
19 views

English language. Usage, marketing project [on hold]

What is another way to say "who we are". Example, describing a company.
0
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1answer
22 views

How to express “I got to know about this from someone” in a better way?

In verbal communication, I can say "I got to know that our analysis is complete from David". But, in written communication, how will I express the same ? I found that "learnt" is used most commonly i....
0
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1answer
19 views

Is it correct to use “I have something on hold”?

For example, some people have offered me price, and I am waiting for last person so I tell him Can you offer your price quickly? Because I have some offers on hold, that I have to reply to those ...
-2
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1answer
17 views

formal expression in website

we have a website and want to remind people who want to register must show his/her true name, because the name which registered will connect with the bank account for payment later. so if my ...
0
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3answers
37 views

The Usage Of “Coming Along”

I have a question about the viability of this phrase. "We were hungry and when the food came along it didn't last" My biggest concern is how does the "Coming along" expression can and can't be used ...
1
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3answers
53 views

Is “do for” always inherently positive, compared to “do to”?

Compare the sentences: After all he has done for me, he needs my help. After all he has done to me, he needs my help. The first one implies that the subject has done good things for the speaker and ...
4
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1answer
58 views

How informal exactly is “good stuff”?

I work at a large financial services company in Germany where we have rather formal ways. We have a manager who frequently uses the expression "good stuff" to comment on progress and results of ...
6
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3answers
77 views

Looking for an English word or expression for not having a real boss in charge

There is a Hungarian word fejetlenség, literally, having no head, in the state of having no head, meaning a situation where a state or an organisation is an unruly mess. Is there an English ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is is right to say “to do a medical exam”?

Here's the case: At the appointment the doctor asks the patient to _______ the (say) heart exam. The patient goes to the hospital to check if everything is ok, and asks the staff to ______ the exam (...
0
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1answer
27 views

Post idioms and explain their origins [on hold]

I'm new here so Hello to each and everyone of you. I don't know whether this site is only dedicated to asking questions; therefore my post may not pertain here. If so, someone will surely delete it. ...
0
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2answers
29 views

More general term than “uncanny valley”

I'm looking for a shorter way to convey the meaning of The phenomenon of something being found saliently disturbing due to its imperfect similarity to (but little compatibility with) something ...
0
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0answers
16 views

How to avoid the word “that” in a reception history

I'm writing a reception history and find myself expressing the sources as "X said Y about Z" or "X said that Z was Y" (mainly the latter). I can vary the verb and invert the sentence, but how else can ...
-2
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0answers
46 views

How do you politely say in this situation? [on hold]

Our company was supposed to undertake tasks and place in the position as contact desk for a certain event、but the negotiations ended up with being broke off. A customer is currently contacting us ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

Why is it “study the [instrument]” instead of “study playing the [instrument]”?

Musicians often say things like "I study the violin", but "I majored in violin performance". It seems to me that it should be "I study violin performance" to both match with the thing actually being ...
3
votes
3answers
180 views

How to say that foods with too strong taste can kill the flavor of the wine?

Recently I had a dinner with my friends and I wanted to say that, "The food's taste is so strong that it kills the flavor of the wine." Are there expressions with the similar meaning but also with ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Using 'On the night' [closed]

When I was on my English academy I was told that to refer to something that happens at night I should use 'at' and not 'on'. However, there is a Dire Strait album called 'On the night' so that title ...
-1
votes
0answers
50 views

'passive' vs 'active' dietary therapy

How do I explain that my questionnaire included range levels of active dietary therapy and passive dietary therapy? is it even correct to say "passive dietary therapy"? if not, how do I say it ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Is there a phrase for “something good that doesn't last long”?

In Arabic, the expression "Summer cloud" is usually used to mean that "this is not going to last for a long time" or "it won't last as long as you think it will". Is there an equivalent phrase in ...
12
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6answers
1k views

More eloquent idiom/expression for the phrase “cut it at the roots/source to prevent the problem from growing/escalating ”

There's nothing particularly wrong with the phrase that's in the title except I figure there may be some better sounding alternative or something more pleasing to the ears. Example usage: We have to ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Word for turning a situation around on someone

Let me describe the situation: My wife has been having issues with a certain employee at work...long story short, this other employee now goes out of her way to try and exclude/snub/cold shoulder my ...
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0answers
22 views

Is there any difference between the meanings of “phonetic translation”, “phonetic transcription”, and “transliteration”? [on hold]

I was asked to provide phonetic translation for legal name (as original characters are none-Latin characters), does it mean I must make transliteration (or phonetic transcription)?
1
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1answer
42 views

Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people?

Was H. L. Mencken the first to say 'Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people.", or was he paraphrasing another comentator?
4
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3answers
53 views

the expression is roughly equivalent to “ Cover your breast over the baby's mouth”

In my own language, the "Cover your breasts over the baby's mouth" is such a lovely and interesting idiom. It's derived from the thing that is: a baby cries very much and the mother is too busy with ...
0
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3answers
47 views

If someone has the right to something, how could I say in this situation

If someone has the right to something, how could I say in this situation. My client would like an organiser to cover flight ticket fare for business class due to physical health problem. According to ...
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5answers
50 views

Word or phrase for the moment/reason/motive you reveal to someone why you had acted a certain way prior to parting ways

A massive cliche in action movies (especially James Bond), but is there actually a word for that moment when the evil villain reveals their deadly plot to the action hero before (usually attempting ...
3
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1answer
53 views

What do you call the tendency to oversimplify an issue?

I have noticed that there is a tendency in many people, and certainly in groups as a whole, to avoid, ignore, or trivialize complex and difficult issues by placing focus on issues that are similar and ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the correct way to use “Hands Down” in a sentence, grammar-wise? [closed]

What is the correct option\s in this case? Hands down, the best value for your money! Hands down, get best value for your money! It's hands down the best value for your money! The best value for ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

“Divide the divided”? [closed]

Is there a political hypothesis that has the same meaning as "dividing the divided"? I've seen it in Arabic but didn't find the English equivalent. It's used in the context of countries. It is like "...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

'There is no such a thing as a free lunch' in academic writing [closed]

In the context of an academic publication in British English, I'm tempted to paraphrase the expression "There is no such a thing as a free lunch". Does it sound too informal and, if so, are there ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Word or phrase for customers won from a competitor

In the context of a company that makes or sells a product (e.g. accounting software) where there are many alternatives on the market, is there a word or [short] phrase to describe "new customers that ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

“server, please!” — is there a comma in there?

Related to youtube/5ycx9hFGHog, I'd like to know whether it is correct or incorrect to put a comma between "server" and "please", when writing about an act of calling one's server, whether the "please"...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

How to correctly name the windows on a wristwatch?

Well, I know it can seem to be primitive, but I cannot find a sharp definition. I am working for a wristwatches catalog, and it must be stated right. Some manufacturers call it a crystal, some call ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

What's a phrase to capture traffic, road type, weather conditions?

What is a short phrase that could be used to describe the conditions under which one is driving (traffic, road type, stop-and-go, weather)? Our product provides a "rating" to consumers of how risky ...
5
votes
4answers
143 views

Equivalent idiom for “turning in one's grave” for a living person?

If you do something that would greatly upset a deceased person, it would cause him to "turn in his grave". However, what if the person affected is still alive? Is there an equivalent idiom for this?
2
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2answers
68 views

More inclusive/formal synonym for “grandfathered in”?

The expression "grandfathered in" or similar expressions like "grandfather clause" aren't always immediately clear to people for whom English is a second language. But I'm hard pressed to come up ...
3
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3answers
85 views

How should we describe a misdiagnosis due to the fact that the correct diagnosis has not yet been discovered?

Respected members I am a primary care pediatrician from South India, with 31 years experience after my graduation and 26 yeas after MD. Primary care rests on three pillars. Equity,(not equality), ...
0
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0answers
50 views

How long have you been to Hawaii? [migrated]

How long have you been to Hawaii? I had a discussion about the sentence in the title and was told, the sentence is wrong or funny, or you do not say that way. I think the phrase "have been to (...
5
votes
2answers
227 views

“Everything is up for grabs”

(from an article in The New Yorker about Donald Trump's campaign) Asked by the Associated Press about the possibility of a Trump Presidency, she said, “I don’t want to think about that possibility,...
6
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1answer
125 views

What is the origin of “Judas gate”?

While reading the Jack Higgins novel “The Eagle Has Landed” (1975) I came across the phrase “Judas gate”. Research on-line indicates he is rather fond of the word, going to the point of naming another ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Term for person assimilating all events into furthering a prior agenda

Extreme example: Team discussion about whether to buy A or B ends with decision to buy A. Proponents of B are perpetually unhappy with the decision and will see any future crisis as an opportunity to ...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

Synonym for “from the trenches” [closed]

The expression "from the trenches" implies a down-to-reality focus as in "a view from the trenches". Is there any other english expression implying the same meaning ?
-2
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1answer
38 views

“Once in a while” OR “Once in awhile”? [duplicate]

1. Once in a while OR 2. Once in awhile Which is the correct phrase? I'm thinking it's the first one, but I'm unable to find out for certain. "a while" vs "awhile" and ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

How to properly tell a customer he/she is not allowed to modify software interface? [closed]

How can I properly tell a customer that, although he/she knows how to do it and he/she has the possibility, he/she is not allowed, by contract, to modify the layout of the software we just sold him? ...
81
votes
3answers
14k views

Why does “Mickey Mouse Operation” refer to a poorly run company?

A phrase I commonly hear (and use myself) when a company (or individual, in some cases) does something that seems foolish or not planned is to ask What kind of Mickey Mouse operation are you ...
24
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3answers
2k views

Why are “slip roads” called that way?

Slip roads are used to allow vehicles to merge in a road whose speed is higher or, conversely, let them leave it safely. This term appears to be British English usage. Here is an example of usage: ...
0
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0answers
40 views

a word for “universal weltanshauung”"

Similar to "weltanshauung" or "worldview"...need to find, or create a word that designates on a cosmic or galactic scale an originated (human-species-life force) comprehensive, elemental defined ...
0
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1answer
55 views

When to use a question mark for “I beg your pardon”

In writing, to mean 'Say that again please?', do I have to use '?' at the end of the sentence 'I beg your pardon'?
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0answers
50 views

How to tell someone that it's not urgent, there is no need to hurry?

My supervisor told he was too busy to review my paper this month and asked if there was any urgency on my side. I want to tell him it is not urgent. How to reply him naturally and politely? Can I say "...