Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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1answer
18 views

Is “good for you” a sarcastic usage most of time?

I would like to know what "good for you" mean at most of time. After my own research, I knwe that it could mean "congratulations" and alternatively "would like an award" when speaking sacracsticlly. I ...
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2answers
17 views

Term/expression to describe a user's license (account) is allowed to be used?

I have a software that manages user accounts at a given service. The administrator creates the account, the user validates e-mail and other data and then the account is considered to be valid/good ...
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4answers
63 views

What do you call someone who solves puzzles?

What is a term or name for someone who is very adept at solving puzzles or situations that require though processing and logic. I ran across this question, however this only deals with crossword ...
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0answers
21 views

Which verb form to use after "had better do that it [migrated]

what is the right verb form for "had better" sentences? for example: she had better remember that she has to leave the city soon OR she had better remember that she have to leave the city soon ...
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1answer
30 views

Word for the concept of a perfect fit [on hold]

Is there any word to define the concept of something that fits perfectly? Like the expression "Fits like a glove" but shorter.
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0answers
14 views

Term for a storyline that splits in two

Is there a term for a storyline that splits into two points of view? For example, two characters who travel together split paths and plot unfolds in two different timelines. It can probably be applied ...
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2answers
29 views

What does “I feel friendly” mean?

If I want to express the feeling that other people are very friendly to me, what is the proper way to say it? Is it okay to say:"I feel you are very friendly"? Is there any better way to say so? ...
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6answers
161 views

Men sweat, but women glisten. What's the equivalent for a woman for snoring?

Colloquially, we say that men sweat, but women glisten. Is there an equivalent word for describing when women snore?
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1answer
42 views

Why do people use the term "free gift'?

I see and hear the term "Free Gift". Are not all gifts free?
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1answer
18 views

Proper word for “all type of rooms / accommodations”?

I'm working on this app and right now it has a common taxonomy called "hotel". However, this app can work with hotels, chains of hotels, apartments, rooms, cabins, guesthouses and anything you could ...
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0answers
32 views

Which is better, no good at sports or not good at sports?

Which of the following sounds more natural to native ears? 1. I'm not good at sports. 2. I'm no good at sports. Is there any difference in the meaning?
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7answers
390 views

Expression for internal struggle

In German language, there is the beautiful expression "seinen inneren Schweinehund überwinden", which amounts to "to overcome one's inner pig-dog", and vividly describes the feeling of surpassing the ...
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1answer
90 views

Where does “the sky is falling” come from?

According to Wikipedia the common expression "the sky is falling" is from a folk tale: Henny Penny, more commonly known in the United States as "Chicken Little" and sometimes as "Chicken ...
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0answers
25 views

Appropriate use of “to have a background in…” [closed]

Is it reasonable to say that I have a background in information technology when I have worked as a programmer for over ten years, but have no university degree or formal training?
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2answers
102 views

What does “Take care sweets” mean?

A good friend wrote me an email and at the end she added Take care sweets. I guess it's something good, but not sure what is the exact meaning. I searched a little bit what does that mean and didn't ...
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3answers
45 views

“accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”

I am arguing with my colleague about what phrase is easier to understand, i.e. "accounts for up to" vs "is gained from". My wording is the following: Sometimes this sector accounts for up to 70% ...
2
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1answer
42 views

What is the source for “My back foot!”

Does anyone know where the phrase "My back foot!", used as an expression of disbelief comes from? The seemingly, obvious source would be a reference to being on the defensive as to the truthfulness of ...
2
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0answers
39 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [on hold]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
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1answer
77 views

where does the phrase “all of a 2 'n 8” originate from?

where does the phrase "all of a 2 'n 8" originate from? It means - not knowing what to do - confused - unsettled
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5answers
204 views

The “wrought /wreaked havoc” misunderstanding

According to the American Heritage Dictionary: the past tense and past participle of the verb to wreak is wreaked, not wrought, which is an alternative past tense and past participle of work. ...
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2answers
42 views

English (UK) - does “an enraged expression” make sense?

I am writing a book and one of my characters is angry but I feel like angry doesn't fit in and that enraged makes more sense and also makes the language of the book better but I'm not sure if it makes ...
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2answers
86 views

A powerful idiom for “low exposure” [on hold]

Imagine someone creates a piece of art, but nobody notices it. Like a great book, which nobody reads because nobody knows that it exists. What are some powerful words or metaphors for this condition? ...
5
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1answer
122 views

Is there a word for when you run into someone and both of you try to avoid each other and fail, repeatedly? [duplicate]

It has most certainly happened to all of us at least once: Two people walking along the same narrow pathway in opposite directions walk into each other. There is room for both to pass each other, ...
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0answers
850 views

Is “She is under the shower” a proper English sentence? [migrated]

There is currently a debate on Duolingo about the proper translation of a sentence to English (the original language isn't the point of this question). The sentence, literally translates to "She is ...
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2answers
45 views

What words can express the act of sharing in a collective sense, as opposed to a distributive sense

I would like words or very concise statements that express the act of working together and sharing items/resources to a common location for the benefit of a group of people that the items are being ...
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1answer
112 views

What made the “worst case scenario” a popular expression?

A worst-case scenario is a cliché that refers to: the worse possible future outcome. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms) Though the meaning is quite intuitive, the ...
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2answers
43 views

Term for choosing by not choosing [duplicate]

Is there a term for rejecting a proposal by not actively endorsing/confirming/voting for it? Like a veto, but by abstention, rather than active participation. Alternatively, a term for "A choice ...
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0answers
31 views

Difference: 'leave somebody wondering' vs. 'make somebody wonder'? [migrated]

Is there a difference between (a) 'leave somebody wondering' and (b) 'make somebody wonder'? If so, what difference? Is there some difference in aspect? For example, does 'leave somebody wondering' ...
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2answers
37 views

Set X to v? or Set X as v?

I'm writing an academic paper, and would like to say that the value of X is v using imperative form. (Specifically in the algorithm section. That's why I need to use imperative.) Which among the ...
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1answer
50 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
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0answers
16 views

Is it “visit at the doctor” or “visit at the doctor's”? What's the difference? [duplicate]

Are both expressions OK? Why/ why not? Why do we say "at the doctor's"?
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1answer
60 views

What does “crack around the door” mean?

Can I use "crack around the door" in the following situation? If I am wrong, could you give me the correct expression? Thank you. The door of Dad's room was half-open. Through the crack around the ...
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1answer
52 views

Is is correct to use this expression in an e-mail: “I have also attached…”

Is it grammatical to use the expression "I have also attached ..." in an email? For example: "I have also attached the screenshot of the faculty list at University which I was on." And if it's ...
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0answers
16 views

Noun clause for complement

I'd like to say following facts as short as possible. We conducted a experiment. The purpose of the experiment is testing a hypothesis The hypothesis is that all of beatle in this island is black ...
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0answers
32 views

“The last of the late brakers”

This is a common phrase in motorsports, particularly with motorcycles. Carrying speed for as long as possible, and braking as late and hard as possible into a turn, is advantages to lower overall ...
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5answers
92 views

What's the more common way to refer to a road with 180° curves?

A hairpin road is a road with hairpin turns or bends. According to Wikipedia: A hairpin bend , named for its resemblance to a hairpin/bobby pin, is a bend in a road with a very acute ...
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1answer
58 views

A word for this kind of intimate action [duplicate]

When somebody touches you in some sensitive areas of your body, like armpits, "it will make you laugh in some kind of way". When you want to tell somebody that you are not going to touch them in that ...
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2answers
42 views

Safety First or Safety's first? [closed]

Is Expression "Safety First" grammatically correct, or " Safety's first"? Also,There is a website called TED "ideas worth spreading".. I think it should be ideas are worth spreading because worth ...
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0answers
25 views

A word to describe interest in a process related to a certain situation but not in the situation itself

The word to describe a person's interest in a process related to a certain situation but does not necessarily convey their interest in the situation itself. To provide context: Over the last 4 years ...
2
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1answer
48 views

What does plaster in “plaster saint” refer to?

The saying plaster saint is used to refer to: A person who makes a show of being without moral faults or human weakness, especially in a hypocritical way. (ODO) The expression is ...
2
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3answers
57 views

Contractors becoming part of company they are working for

What's the term when a contractor (or other person) who is technically employed by company A but works so much/closely with company B, that they feel more loyal to company B or assimilate better with ...
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0answers
39 views

“Should it go through the formality of actually happening …”

When did phrases such as go through the formality of taking place and its logical equivalents (such as going through or experiencing the formality of actually happening or existing or ...
28
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16answers
3k views

Is there any equivalent to this Persian proverb? “A bad or faulty item should inevitably be kept by its owner”

We use a proverb that implies "A bad property (i.e., a thing belonging to someone) or item should inevitably be tolerated/kept by its owner" when we want to say "This bad item won't be accepted by ...
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2answers
89 views

The phrase “the reason has to be because XXX” [duplicate]

Husband asked, "Do you think it's true that men use 15,000 words a day and women use double?" The wife replied, "I think so, The reason has to be because we have to repeat everything to ...
3
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3answers
107 views

Great God in boots!

In a letter of Bertrand Russell there is this sentence: I threw the tin in the air and exclaimed out loud 'Great God in boots, the ontological argument is sound.' What's the meaning of 'Great ...
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2answers
59 views

Can 'no-brainer' mean 'so we don't have to use our brains'?

Real life example: at work (software) we decided to use a tool (StyleCop) to ensure all coders conformed to the same set of coding style rules, using all the supplied rules out of the box. So, while ...
1
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1answer
34 views

As long as… which version is better? [closed]

I want to express the following: As long as A exists, B exists. As long as B exists, C exists. It does not sound smooth to me. I was considering this version too: As long as A exists, so ...
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0answers
29 views

what do you call a visit to someone who has just beat an illness?

If I was visiting someone to wish well on them and thank God for their soundness and them overriding ailment and illness, what do you call that sort of visit? Let's go to Mark and ...... It's not ...
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2answers
45 views

What single term or expression is used to rename a type of name for an object?

I am seeking guidance on alternate words or grammatical rule for renaming a type of name that an object might have. As an example you might refer to you cell phone with a number of different types of ...
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1answer
68 views

Origin of 'Dutch Courage'

I was wondering if anyone could shed some more definite light on the origin of the phrase 'Dutch Courage.' I have found two, almost certainly apocryphal, origins: 1: From the Thirty Years War in ...