Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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8answers
407 views

What do you call it when you don't give up

In Dutch we've got the expression 'Vastbijten in'. It means you really get into a problem or some work. And you won't give up till it's resolved. I've been looking all over the web, but I've not been ...
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1answer
37 views

Is 'crewing' only about seamen?

Is 'crewing' mainly about seamen or can it also be used as a general synonym of staffing, hiring, recruiting, employing, etc? I want to use it in a sentence like 'the art of crewing' or 'crewing art' ...
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1answer
34 views

“What are our numbers?”

How can I correctly ask a question like "What are our numbers?" meaning what are the number of people in the audience in comparison with number of people in some other audience.
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1answer
34 views

Exact meaning of good for you [duplicate]

I told my friend, today I went for shopping. He replied me “Good for You”. Is it rude or normal?
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1answer
32 views

Avoiding Ignorance

Is the phrase "avoid ignorance" idiomatic? In my mind something is wrong about the combination of the verb "avoid" and the noun "ignorance".
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2answers
47 views

Word/Phrase for “process of falling of tiny particles off a bread/biscuit piece”

Please consider the situation: A bread piece has some tiny particles which we see keep on removing off bread, or lying loosely on a surface after we remove it from that surface (These tiny particles ...
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2answers
24 views

Use of “on the grounds” in the context of a government decision

The following sentence comes from a foreign publication. It sounds wrong to me, but I am not a native English speaker. Is it grammatically and idiomatically correct? The government banned ...
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0answers
15 views

A phrase to replace sentence [on hold]

I'm need help in replacing this sentence with a phrase or example. People often avoid being part of situation like fighting against a crime. They should actually be a link in chain. Not be afraid of ...
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2answers
59 views

Am I syntactically wrong in these sentences? [on hold]

I have recently written a few sentences for discussion of rhetorical ways in writing. The outcome turned out to be so unexpected that I was blamed for how wrong I syntactically was. So I cordially ...
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3answers
32 views

Alternatives to “Such As” [on hold]

It will be more difficult for Bobby to behave well if Peggy is aggressive, such as hitting him or teasing him. What is the right clause, expression or phrase to use instead of such as. That ...
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1answer
29 views

Is “more general, still” an acceptable expression?

Are "more general, still", or "more general, yet" acceptable variations of "still more general"?
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4answers
335 views

The Road Warrior

In modern business speak one increasingly sees the phrase "Road Warrior" used to refer to people who spend a lot of their time travelling for work. Looking at it independentaly this seems a bit of an ...
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3answers
145 views

What do you call something that doesn't let you sleep?

Especially a thought. Example: Like last night, I couldn't sleep. This time, however, [...] wasn't my upcoming wedding, but the fact that I was going to get fired tomorrow. So like a ...
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4answers
43 views

which one is more appropriate, “Following” or “Further to”

Is it OK to say "Following the task that has been given to us, I would like to invite you to a meeting"? Or should I say "Further to the task that has been given to us, I would like to invite you to ...
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1answer
41 views

“One from another” or “from one another”?

Suppose I have a collection of objects (more than two). I wanted to write "They are at a certain distance one from another". Someone pointed out I should write "They are at a certain distance from ...
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4answers
174 views

What's a metaphor/expression for “confirmation”?

Example: I already knew about what she said. Her words were merely a [...]. I checked Thesaurus but none of the synonyms seem like a metaphor/expression. Maybe go ahead?
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1answer
79 views

Living under the same roof

Can we say that: " I am living under the same roof with my dog" ? As far as I understand the expression refers to a relationship and its challenges like for example marriage but can we use the same ...
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3answers
69 views

Formal alternatives for: “There is not a need”

I am writing a formal technical report and I would like some advice about an expression I want to use. I have a sentence which I want to make more formal: The merit of their approach is that ...
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1answer
59 views

What's the meaning of the expression “[something] much?”

I see this often. I don't understand what it means. Just a noun followed by "much?". What would something like that mean? Maybe it's not "real English". I don't know. For example, some of the titles ...
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1answer
42 views

“Without whom…” or “whom … without”? [closed]

Is it more grammatically correct to move the preposition without to the end of its clause, or use without whom? Does the "in no particular order" change matters? I wish to express my sincere ...
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1answer
59 views

A more elegant way of writing “attempt to replicate them” for Teaching Statement

I'm writing up my Teaching Statement for an Assistant Professor position in the sciences. Because all I do is read and write science, I have no elegance in my writing at all! I'm trying to make the ...
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7answers
639 views

Word meaning: “The act of taking/obtaining that of which is rightly yours, but you've never had.”

Other examples include: "Liberating oneself by obtaining a right or value one deserves, but has never had." "To have the ability to do something for the first time." Something like secure, capture, ...
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2answers
53 views

Meaning of “desperate picnic”

I've seen the expression "desperate picnic" whose exact meaning I've been unable to find in the Internet. I thought it could be a common expression in English. The full sentence was: Dwarika's ...
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0answers
25 views

What is the similar expression of “the young go-getters” in BE?

Could anyone help me? If I am asking the UK expression that is similar with this US colloquialism “the young go getters”, would I learn something from you?
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0answers
17 views

how to communicate effectively with the person [closed]

I want to know about deep description about communicate effectively with the person. It is very important to analyze them and understand them. If any body given me the steps it will be very useful ...
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4answers
100 views

Expression for (wrong) 'common knowledge'. A set of common misconceptions

When some knowledge is available to most of us, quite evident and widely accepted, we say it's 'common knowledge'. Let's think about the same situation, except that this so-called knowledge is ...
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2answers
32 views

Quote: 'stand in great wisdom'

I came across this expression while I was reading "Asgard Stories". This is a dialogue between Heimdall, guardian of Bifrost, the "trembling bridge", and Odin. Because of his good work, Odin says very ...
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2answers
62 views

Is “I wish I had one of those …” correctly used in the following sentence?

Sex Education Club? I wish I had one of those when I was a student. The bolded part actually means, I wish my university had had one of those so I could have joined . . . But I picked I wish I ...
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1answer
38 views

news for nose meaning

I had heard the expression "have a nose for news" but when I was watching a tv show (web of lies) the expression was "news for nose". The exact quote goes like this: GEORGE WEBER NOT ONLY HAD A ...
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2answers
42 views

“Thought of” vs. “thought about”. What's the difference? [duplicate]

What's the difference between "thought of" and "thought about"? One difference I'm aware of is that you use "thought of" when something comes to mind but you don't analyze it, and "thought about" if ...
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1answer
23 views

“You gotta do what you gotta do” and similar expressions

You gotta do what you gotta do. It's there because it's there. Stuff, because stuff. Does this pattern of expression have a name? Existential assertion, maybe?
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4answers
60 views

weighted sum of values VS sum of weighted values,

I studied Neural Network, and there occurs following formula. S = Sum ( weight of N * value of N ) In the text book and other references, they indicate S as 'an weighted sum of values'. I have some ...
0
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1answer
43 views

“Kinda figured it out ” vs “kinda figured out” [closed]

Example: Speaker A: Were you surprised about my confession? Speaker B: Not really. Kinda figured (it) out when you held my hand last night." Kinda figured it out has 180 hits on Google ...
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2answers
23 views

“Similarly to” at the beginning of a sentence

I have a follow up question to using "Similarly to" at the beginning of a sentence. "similarly to" in the sentence beginning suggests to use "As in". Does "as in" mean "equally" or just ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Is the following ungrammatical expression common in speech?

Don't be ashamed. It was cute, like a shy teenager. I'm not very sure if this is a grammatical mistake, but I think the correct version would look like this: Don't be ashamed. It was cute, ...
2
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1answer
46 views

What's the word for 'new yet old'? [closed]

I am trying to think of the word that describes something that is new yet old, contemporary yet classic, progressive yet traditional or any other similar meanings. The word is used to describe a ...
1
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7answers
89 views

A more vernacular way of saying “adopt an alternative approach”?

I'm trying find a more vernacular way to express "adopt an alternative approach". The context is "Looks like a bit of a challenge there. Perhaps I should adopt an alternative approach?" and the ...
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2answers
34 views

Formalities calling work colleagues, clients an partners as Pal/Pals

In my work we have a collaborative tool for work interaction where we debate things like workflow and issues. I'm in a interaction with workmates, client employees and partners. I thought to reference ...
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1answer
54 views

What is the word for an amused surprise?

You tell your friend about a person's funny habit and that person shows it right away without knowing. You tell your friend "See!". You are surprised but you were right. What is the verb for that kind ...
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1answer
29 views

“Put on a show” vs. “put on an act”. What's the difference?

What's the difference between "put on a show" and "put on an act"? Are they interchangeable? They look similar in meaning to me. Is there any nuanced difference? Examples sentences from ...
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2answers
34 views

Listen to it rain and look at it snow

Do the following sentences make sense and are they used commonly? 1) Listen to it rain. 2) Look at it snow.
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0answers
4 views

point the note OR note the point? [migrated]

If I want to thank someone because mntioned a good subject, which one would be the best and why? Thanks for pointig great note. Thanks for noting great point. Or are these basically the ...
1
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3answers
132 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
2
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1answer
57 views

Lost In Punctuation

Usually, when a piece of text is translated from one language to some other language, and (due to slightly different idioms, phrases, words, etc.) the end meaning is changed, then it is attributed to ...
2
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3answers
92 views

closing words for e-mail to person with incurable disease [closed]

What kind of closing words as an alternative to We wish you full and quick recovery can be used in a formal letter when writing to a person with an incurable disease. I/We wish you all the ...
2
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6answers
695 views

Another way to say “it never hurts”

It wouldn't hurt you to be a bit more serious. Wouldn't/won't/never hurts make perfect sense in this example. I'm wondering if there's any alternative way to preserve the meaning of this phrase in a ...
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2answers
58 views

“Patch up holes along the way.” Is this idiom common?

I'm not a native English speaker so I have no idea. Example: "I think I should I start my story from the beginning. That way you don't have to patch up holes along the way." I worry that the ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Is “Interpose Model” the correct term

I have a question in context of electrical engineering. Imagine a schematic of electrical components or a netlist, where I want to change the behavior of one part by cutting the wiring and adding a ...
14
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4answers
1k views

What is a “moorland farmer”?

I came across the phrase "moorland farmer" yesterday while reading The Hound of the Baskervilles, and Google shows that the phrase has some currency. [link] We don't have moors in the U.S. — or ...
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2answers
69 views

Make something great out of a bad situation

I'm looking for an expression similar to "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade." This phrase means to make the best out of a bad situation. I am looking for a phrase for when someone did do ...