Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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0
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0answers
19 views

On the referent of 'during that time' / 'meanwhile'

Can during that time refer to a relatively long time? Or can during that time be used regardless of whether the span is long or short? For example, I think (1) is ok: (1) I waited for a bus for 10 ...
11
votes
5answers
882 views

Word/phrase that means a series of problems of increasing severity caused by a small error

Something small goes wrong, and this triggers something slightly bigger, which triggers something slightly bigger, and so on and so forth until you end up with a chain of problems of increasing ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

'In the ranks' OR 'With the ranks'

Which of the following two phrases is correct? I'd put him right there in the ranks of the best anthropologists out there. OR I'd put him right there with the ranks of the best ...
1
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3answers
58 views

Phrase/Idiom for increasing odds of winning by placing multiple bets

I'm looking for a phrase/idiom that represents when you increase your chances of winning some sort of gamble (or event with multiple possible outcomes) by saturating the field with bets. E.g. ...
10
votes
12answers
2k views

Is there an expression or idiom for something convenient that happens right when you need it to?

Especially if it's something unlikely. Almost as if it could only happen in a movie. For instance, you're about to be robbed and a random cop on patrol arrives at that exact time. What are the chances ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Is there an idiom suggesting the following fact: The name of the book belies the theme in it.

E.g.: I answer a question on ELU based on the subject line, however, I realise later that the body of the question provide a different input altogether. The name of the book belies the theme in ...
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6answers
97 views

What's a word or phrase for someone who has worked hard all their life

Someone who has been worn down by a harsh working-life?
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Is there a term for someone who uses wordsl like “thee” & “thine” in their daily language?

I'm curious if there is a word for someone who uses "thee" or "thine" or other words like these in their daily language?
3
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4answers
103 views

Word or expression for when a person not under pressure is able to see an issue easier than the person under pressure?

Is there a word or expression for how it is easier for someone not under pressure to make a decision versus someone that is under pressure. One example is how a person looking over someone's ...
0
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0answers
28 views

English sentence interpretaiton [on hold]

In general conditions of the works contract, it is mentioned that schedule of rates/price schedule is inluded "The costs and risks of all rents, royalties, licenses, permits, permission and other ...
0
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3answers
53 views

What does “delinquent” mean in this context? [on hold]

I'm more or less aware of the meanings of the word delinquent. However, I can't decide what it exaclty means in the following quote which is from god is not Great by Christopher Hitchens and where he ...
0
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1answer
40 views

“Charges levied” Actually a thing?

I am positive I've heard of "charges levied," as in "criminal charges brought against" (e.g. the sentence "The charge levied against my client is unfounded."). However, while searching for a ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Another way to write, ''Why now''? When people know it is good, but are suspicious of the timing)

Another way to write, ''Why now''? (When people know it is good, but are suspicious of the timing)
-1
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1answer
27 views

English Sentence interpretation

Under the schedule of rates of a commercial contract it is specified that schedule of prices includes "All rents, royalties, licenses, permits, permissions and any other fee, duty, penalty, levy, ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

What is the opposite for “thin-skinned”? [on hold]

What is the idiom or term for describing a usually respectful and nice person who is not easily offended by others' criticism, advice, jokes, or insults? ( I know the opposite is "thin-skinned", but ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Meaning of “there’s a fire burning in someone's bones”

What is the meaning of the expression "there’s a fire burning in someone's bones" in below and when does it is said: there’s a fire burning in my bones And I still believe.
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3answers
104 views

Good Luck **in** all your endeavors' versus Good Luck **to** all your endeavors'

What is the difference between 'I am currently busy with family stuff so I really don't know when is a good time to catch up. Good Luck in all your endeavors' versus 'I am currently busy with family ...
1
vote
3answers
68 views

What is the job title of these municipal officers?

In some countries,( specially Asia) some vendors spread their stuffs for sale on the ground ( upper picture), and thereby cause trouble for the pedestrians comeing and going. For preventing this , ...
3
votes
3answers
113 views

What does “… which is somewhat long in tooth” mean, and what is the source of the phrase? [on hold]

This is the complete sentence where I found it. It is from an online training about the Linux operating system. e4defrag is part of the e2fsprogs package and should be on all modern Linux ...
8
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4answers
138 views

A term for someone denying an accusation but appearing guilty as a result

The situation being when you are accused of something, and provide a logical reason why you wouldn't (not couldn't) do such a thing, and such an explanation only makes you sound more guilty. For ...
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2answers
38 views

Can we use “I can put you down..” when enlisting someone for an appointment?

For example, "I can put you down on a weekend tour." As far as i know, when you use the phrase "Put you down" it's more of embarrassing someone or it could also mean that you want to kill that ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

How to request someone to start a process?

I am an engineer dealing with other companies(vendors). Our company has to sign a Non-Disclosure agreement(NDA) with the vendor before we start any discussion. Now, the NDA signing is a process that ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

What are some synonymous phrases for the phrase “Turning Criminal”?

I need suggestions for different ways to say "turning criminal," as in "He began turning criminal, committing illegal acts instead of abiding by the law."
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2answers
70 views

What are some actual polite words for filthy words? [on hold]

I have a habit of cussing a bit. I don't wanna use cute words for filthy words. I wanna use polite sounding words, that mean the same as the filthy sounding cuss words.
4
votes
2answers
82 views

What is the verb or expression for describing some kids in this situation?

Suppose there are some naughty kids who are playing with each other in a room, they nudge each other and wrestle and climb (?) on each other! I want to tell them to stop. Which verb should I use? ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Usage of “give it a read”

Is the usage of the phrase "give it a read" correct? For instance, "Hey, I have attached my essay. Do give it a read and let me know what you think".
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2answers
58 views

To be sound in doing something?

I've looked up each and every possible meanings of sound. I've reduced the options to two or so. But I still find it hard to ascertain the meaning of sound and the way its is used in this context. ...
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1answer
36 views

I lost my temper in Domino's pizza the other day and ended up pushing the bloke “behind the till” [closed]

I lost my temper in Domino's pizza the other day and ended up pushing the bloke behind the till. What is the meaning of "till" here ? Is it preferred to use such formations in general ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

We will join you in an hour.We will be joining you in an hour [duplicate]

We will join you in an hour. We will be joining you in an hour. What difference in the meanings do you see in these sentences. Is it correct? We will join you=we have just decided. We will be ...
0
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2answers
28 views

xx is subject to hotel’s confirmation [closed]

Should I say "xx is subject to hotel's confirmation" or "xx is subject to hotel confirmation"? Thanks!
0
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2answers
36 views

To gain/acquire/obtain comfort with something abstract - is this idiomatic, or at least acceptable?

I am encountering the expression "to gain comfort", "to acquire comfort", and to "obtain comfort" more and more lately. Example: "This issue was looked at in depth in 2013 and we obtained comfort at ...
0
votes
5answers
98 views

Is there a one-word for an act of proactively introducing oneself?

I work for a technology company, and we are associating with another company. So this guy from the other company wrote me an email introducing himself and offering to help me out with anything I ...
4
votes
6answers
2k views

What does “I have no idea what I'm talking about” mean? [closed]

Currently I am learning English language. I found something that I don't know what it means. Some people on the internet put their disclaimer using one sentence I have no idea what I'm talking ...
6
votes
4answers
185 views

What is the opposite of “why not?”

When someone says "why not [something]?" I often want to reply with "why [that thing]?" However, if they don't actually state the "[something]" and just say "why not?" what is the correct opposite ...
1
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1answer
55 views

There you have it again?

I wonder if no one has asked it simply because it is so obvious, but I really can't grasp the exact meaning of there you have it (again). I occasionally infer it from the context but not every single ...
0
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1answer
40 views

“Hazard area” or “hazardous area”?

What is the more common word combination? Or do they mean different things? It refers i. a. to explosion protection. Example: hazard area plan or hazardous area plan
4
votes
5answers
135 views

Idiom/expression that means “canceling” an event from your calendar?

This is a bit tricky because checking off and crossing out could mean that I marked those items as finished. What I want to convey is that I changed my mind and decided not to do those items. ...
0
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2answers
46 views

What is a good pejorative term for people incapable of analytical thinking?

What do you call a person, who can't think logically, and - as a result - tells you how to fix symptom X without even trying to analyze its causes (your computer doesn't work - restart it, if it ...
1
vote
6answers
83 views

Other phrases for “burst through the door”

I'm writing a story and I want my character to burst through the door, not literally through the door, however, I didn't want to use the phrase "burst through the door" but am stuck as to another ...
10
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10answers
2k views

“Sir,' I said to the universe, 'I exist.' 'That,' said the universe, 'creates no sense of obligation in me whatsoever.” [closed]

'Sir,' I said to the universe, 'I exist.' 'That,' said the universe, 'creates no sense of obligation in me whatsoever.' Does the statement mean the universe does not care about you existing ...
0
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2answers
62 views

What does “ have impact” mean? [closed]

I am reading a novel and there are some confusing expressions like the following sentenses. ...feel a little dissatisfied with the kind of impact I was having. Why does he feel dissatisfied? ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Positive or negative statement? [closed]

"Good, now only tell me about mom story. Waiting for 10 years for it." I know there's grammar problem, I heard this statement is blaming. I want to know how positive or negative or neutral?
0
votes
2answers
89 views

What does “tend one's spinning wheel” mean?

However hard I tried I've failed to get the exact meaning of tending his spinning wheel here. It would be argued, and indeed I would argue, that Muslim intransigence would have played a ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

Can I say “Stars dot the sky”? [closed]

Can I say "Stars dot the sky" when there are lots of stars in the sky? Is it grammatically correct (the present simple tense)?
-2
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0answers
17 views

Where does the phrase “thats not a kick in the shirt away from…” come from?

Do we know the etymology of the above phrase? Myself and a colleague know that it means "not far away from" but we are unsure where it comes from.
0
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0answers
37 views

Correct way to ask something

I'd like to know if 'How are you and your family?' and 'How are you and yours?' are both right?
1
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2answers
48 views

What do “attention problems” mean in this context?

I read an abstract from this article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16180285 Unfortunately I don't have access to the whole content. In the end of abstract we read that: However, ...
0
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3answers
54 views

“To get enough feet”? [closed]

I can't tell what is meant by "to get enough feet". Here is an example quotation: Aug 6, 2014 - But some how not managing to get enough feet through our doors. I don't have a budget for marketing ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

In any but the most vestigial and nostalgic way…?

Once again, here I am with a question raised by the highly unintelligable Hitchens... It can be equally useful and instructive to take a glimpse at the closing of religions, or religious movements. ...
6
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1answer
69 views

About “talking X”

I have come across normal usage like "let us talk about science" or "he is talking funny". In the first case, what we are going to talk about is science. In the second case, he is not talking about ...