Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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“You gotta do what you gotta do” and similar expressions

You gotta do what you gotta do. It's there because it's there. Stuff, because stuff. Does this pattern of expression have a name? Existential assertion, maybe?
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1answer
13 views

weighted sum of values VS sum of weighted values,

I studied Neural Network, and there occurs following formula. S = Sum ( weight of N * value of N ) In the text book and other references, they indicate S as 'an weighted sum of values'. I have some ...
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1answer
28 views

“Kinda figured it out ” vs “kinda figured out”

Example: Speaker A: Were you surprised about my confession? Speaker B: Not really. Kinda figured (it) out when you held my hand last night." Kinda figured it out has 180 hits on Google ...
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2answers
19 views

“Similarly to” at the beginning of a sentence

I have a follow up question to using "Similarly to" at the beginning of a sentence. "similarly to" in the sentence beginning suggests to use "As in". Does "as in" mean "equally" or just ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Is the following ungrammatical expression common in speech?

Don't be ashamed. It was cute, like a shy teenager. I'm not very sure if this is a grammatical mistake, but I think the correct version would look like this: Don't be ashamed. It was cute, ...
2
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1answer
37 views

What's the word for 'new yet old'? [on hold]

I am trying to think of the word that describes something that is new yet old, contemporary yet classic, progressive yet traditional or any other similar meanings. The word is used to describe a ...
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7answers
77 views

A more vernacular way of saying “adopt an alternative approach”?

I'm trying find a more vernacular way to express "adopt an alternative approach". The context is "Looks like a bit of a challenge there. Perhaps I should adopt an alternative approach?" and the ...
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2answers
29 views

Formalities calling work colleagues, clients an partners as Pal/Pals

In my work we have a collaborative tool for work interaction where we debate things like workflow and issues. I'm in a interaction with workmates, client employees and partners. I thought to reference ...
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1answer
50 views

What is the word for an amused surprise?

You tell your friend about a person's funny habit and that person shows it right away without knowing. You tell your friend "See!". You are surprised but you were right. What is the verb for that kind ...
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1answer
28 views

“Put on a show” vs. “put on an act”. What's the difference?

What's the difference between "put on a show" and "put on an act"? Are they interchangeable? They look similar in meaning to me. Is there any nuanced difference? Examples sentences from ...
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2answers
32 views

Listen to it rain and look at it snow

Do the following sentences make sense and are they used commonly? 1) Listen to it rain. 2) Look at it snow.
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0answers
4 views

point the note OR note the point? [migrated]

If I want to thank someone because mntioned a good subject, which one would be the best and why? Thanks for pointig great note. Thanks for noting great point. Or are these basically the ...
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3answers
118 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Lost In Punctuation

Usually, when a piece of text is translated from one language to some other language, and (due to slightly different idioms, phrases, words, etc.) the end meaning is changed, then it is attributed to ...
2
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3answers
87 views

closing words for e-mail to person with incurable disease [on hold]

What kind of closing words as an alternative to We wish you full and quick recovery can be used in a formal letter when writing to a person with an incurable disease. I/We wish you all the ...
2
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6answers
672 views

Another way to say “it never hurts”

It wouldn't hurt you to be a bit more serious. Wouldn't/won't/never hurts make perfect sense in this example. I'm wondering if there's any alternative way to preserve the meaning of this phrase in a ...
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2answers
55 views

“Patch up holes along the way.” Is this idiom common?

I'm not a native English speaker so I have no idea. Example: "I think I should I start my story from the beginning. That way you don't have to patch up holes along the way." I worry that the ...
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0answers
15 views

Is “Interpose Model” the correct term

I have a question in context of electrical engineering. Imagine a schematic of electrical components or a netlist, where I want to change the behavior of one part by cutting the wiring and adding a ...
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4answers
1k views

What is a “moorland farmer”?

I came across the phrase "moorland farmer" yesterday while reading The Hound of the Baskervilles, and Google shows that the phrase has some currency. [link] We don't have moors in the U.S. — or ...
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2answers
66 views

Make something great out of a bad situation

I'm looking for an expression similar to "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade." This phrase means to make the best out of a bad situation. I am looking for a phrase for when someone did do ...
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1answer
36 views

From/Since time immemorial

Which is correct? 'From' or 'Since' when applied to 'time immemorial'? I have seen both around, and have a feeling it might be 'from', but would like to check.
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3answers
58 views

word for someone who laughs things off? [closed]

Is there a word for someone who laughs things off? In other words, someone who does no work but when told to do something they just laugh it off.
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9answers
122 views

Word meaning “someone who does all the work” [on hold]

Is there a word for someone who does all of the work? Or for the person who is exploited when someone else steals the credit?
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0answers
26 views

Is this an acceptable way of claiming emphasis?

I proposed this edit to a Stack Exchange answer. Because there were three rather lengthy block quotes, I thought bolding the most relevant sentences would be helpful to readers, especially if they ...
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1answer
22 views

On the use of “is not so […] but”

Is it proper English to say: "With method A, the goal is not so to perform task B but (rather) to address problem C." Are there other more appropriate/elegant ways to convey the same meaning?
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1answer
42 views

Meaning of the phrase “empty your pipe against the heel of your boot” [closed]

Not being a native English speaker, I'm reading What to Talk About to improve my communication skills. While reading, I came across this phrase: empty your pipe against the heel of your boot. I ...
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1answer
49 views

I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning or usage between slightly and a bit? For example, the sentence: I thought she was younger than me, but in fact she proved to be even slightly older. Is ...
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0answers
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Expression in good business cv languageIs this expression in correct business language? “Graphic manage of trade licensings​ & collections” [closed]

Is this expression in correct business language? "Graphic manage of trade licensings​ & collections"
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1answer
102 views

Why do programmers say: “Did you meet the Spartans?” [on hold]

English is not my maternal language and on development/IT forums, I've found the expressions "Did you meet the spartans?" or "I've met the spartans?". To set the context, they are speaking about a new ...
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2answers
54 views

What is the correct visualization of “first left down the hallway”?

I hear a lot of native speakers say something like this: Once in the arena take first left down the hallway Take your first left down the hallway. When you come to the second floor, make a left and ...
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1answer
39 views

When advertisers say product X has N times less 'thing' than product Y, what do they mean [duplicate]

Here is an example: NESTLÉ a+ SLIM Milk has 15 times less fat than regular toned milk. Source:http://www.nestle.in/brands/nestleaplusslim So the question is this: say regular toned milk has 100 ...
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0answers
12 views

Question on using the phrase “draw on” in context.

Is this a proper use? "He is an icon in that he acts as a symbol to draw on."
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1answer
44 views

“Correct” way to describe “looking at someone with new eyes” or similar?

I'm not a native English-speaker, so I'm not sure how to "correctly" phrase the following... When you learn something new about a person, than makes you look at him "with new eyes" - and perhaps ...
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9answers
3k views

Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?

Someone said to me, "X is potentially faster than Y". Without any clarification at that point, I immediately assumed that the speaker thought that X was at least not slower than Y. It was revealed in ...
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1answer
86 views

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair or sofa - in a way that you can be approached from behind?

What is the term for the unpleasant placement of the chair of sofa - in a way that you can be apporached from behind ? I've heard several times that you should place all the sofas and tables that ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Is it possible to use “ every second Saturday” instead of “every other Saturday”?

Is it possible to use " every second Saturday" instead of "every other Saturday"? What about "every two Saturdays"? Is it same as "every other Saturday"?
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0answers
49 views

Is it correct/idiomatic to omit “once” in some cases?

Example: Once again, I traveled three hours just to sit alone. Again, I traveled three hours just to sit alone. We decided to go to the balcony. Once there, we leaned on the ...
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2answers
35 views

“What this thing was” vs “what was this thing” [duplicate]

Example: What this new plan was I had no idea. What was this new plan I had no idea. What's the difference between the two? Is one more common than the others?
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4answers
79 views

Expressions for “exact copy”

Example: The painting was a [...] copy of the original. Are there other common expressions other than exact and identical?
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1answer
52 views

“Buy on credit” - How to say it properly [closed]

How do I properly express to the shop owner when I'm buying an item on credit. Should I say to her: "Hey, I'm buying this on credit." Or just: "On credit, okay?"
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1answer
38 views

English word for this specific behavior [closed]

behavior of a girl friend when she suddenly stops talking, did not reply and ignore you. what word we can use for her this behavior?
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1answer
40 views

Can I say “X decreases the contribution of our report”?

I'd like to mention that the contribution of my writing report will be less if I do not describe about previous research. Is it possible to say that "it decrease the contribution of our report if I ...
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2answers
54 views

Give some examples using “food, cuisine, dish, menu and ingredient” [closed]

I have troubles using some words about food and I cannot feel the subtle differences of their usage. I'd like to get some help with examples using these various words. Food Cuisine dishes menu meal ...
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0answers
58 views

meaning of “Better Thanksgiving than never”?

"Better Thanksgiving than never." I heard this expression first around 3:27 at the front part of the Gossip girl season 1 episode 09. How about the expression? Isn't there any problem to ...
2
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2answers
229 views

expression of the form “I wouldn't trust them with X”

The following expressions are idiomatic: 1) "I wouldn't touch Z with a 10-foot pole", meaning the speaker wouldn't want to be involved with Z in any way. 2) "S couldn't find his way out of a paper ...
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1answer
49 views

Why does “not a one” sound incorrect, but “not a single one” sounds okay?

To me, not a one sounds incorrect, but not a single one sounds okay. Is there any grammar to support why my ears weep at the sound of the former phrase, but not the latter?
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1answer
48 views

What does “Slash the life” mean?

What does the expression "Slash the life" mean? I'm Brazilian and I'm trying to understand what is the meaning of this expression, since I've found it in a music piece that seems to have a positive ...
1
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1answer
73 views

Which expression is correct? “in development” or “under development”?

When talking about a product or project that is still being developed (so it's in an unfinished state at the moment), which expression is the correct one? “in development” or “under development”? For ...
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1answer
35 views

Giving Custom to?

A rather old-fashioned farewell after visiting a store would be Thank you for your custom On the other side of the coin, if you're talking about having visited a store and made use of it, would ...
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3answers
50 views

`Good/correct English' for a 'pay back the effort' [closed]

I'm looking for a term/expression/word that is less plumb then Introducing the following concept is difficult but will pay back in the end.