Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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I've just had a cup: is it correct?

Is it correct to say like this? "Would you like some tea?" "Thank you, but I've just had a cup" Would it be more idiomatic to say had one? Or both options are wrong? If so, how would you ...
1
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2answers
32 views

What's “exchange dark looks with somebody” mean

I've read a sentence "He exchanged dark looks with his wife". But I cannot understand what does the expression "exchange dark looks" mean even though looking up for dictionaries. I'll appreicate ...
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2answers
45 views

Word/expression for inclination toward using disadvantageous tools

What is the best word/expression to describe a phenomenon or tool that, despite its disadvantages, is used by people? In fact, there are some alternatives for them, however, there is a weird ...
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5answers
86 views

Is there an English equivalent to the Chinese saying, 君子之交淡如水 …? [on hold]

The original expression, from the famous Chinese book 'Zhuangzi' continues: "君子之交淡如水,小人之交甘若醴 ..." and its author is expressing that true friendships are like water, but that some relationships, in ...
2
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4answers
99 views

A shorter form of question “Did it happen by coincidence?”

Imagine one person saying: "Oh, both Mary and John called me at the same time". Another asks: "Did it happen by coincidence?". I want to find the shortest possible way of asking the same ...
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1answer
34 views

Alternative to the expression “we are going to”

At the moment I'm writing a sort of economical report over Bosch GmbH. That's a group work and I would like to report our data and our analysis in the most clear and straightforward way. I have an ...
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1answer
40 views

“He cooked me a soup with a lot of hot oil”

I'm looking for an English equivalent to a Persian expression which means this person got me in a lot of trouble. Literally translated, the expression is this person cooked a soup for me that had too ...
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1answer
24 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
4
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3answers
246 views

Annual school events

How would you call these kind of events organized by schools at the end of the year generally in June where children (6 to 12 years old) sing, dance or act? In French we say : "Fête annuelle de ...
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0answers
31 views

Latin Phrases in English [on hold]

Which are the most common Latin words/phrases used in written English?
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1answer
67 views

Opposite of a requiem [on hold]

The definition of a requiem is a song which plays on one's funeral. I was wondering, is there a word which means the opposite - a song which is used as a celebration of one's birth? Thank you!
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5answers
59 views

What does “to have something to them” mean?

I've been reading god is not Great by Christopher Hitchens which is from time to time hard to understand for me. I came across a sentence majority of which makes sense to me, but I lose the track at ...
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0answers
26 views

A Proper Answer to “Hello, I'm Dr. Stephen Newdell, How do you do?” [on hold]

The proper exchange, which apparently alludes everyone is as follows: 'Hello, I'm Dr. Newdell, How do you do?' 'I do well, doctor, and how do YOU do?' 'Quite well thank you. How can I ...
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0answers
43 views

get off having sex [on hold]

I read an article talking about the movie "Nine and a 2/1 week " and found an expression " They get off having sex in public places". What does "get off" mean in this sentence?
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4answers
72 views

What is the expression for a list of low importance items, part of a more important speech?

Summary: I am trying to find an expression equivalent to annonces parafiales in French I am looking for an expression which means "list of items of low importance, appended to a more important ...
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1answer
39 views

What's the origin/etymology of the phrase “regular old”? Does it have a clearly defined meaning?

It seems to me that the adjective phrase "regular old" seems to have a few distinct usages, but a confusing conversation and some fruitless searches as to a specific definition have me coming to ...
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2answers
50 views

Usage of touch the wood? [duplicate]

I've started using English language about 4 years ago after I moved to England. I came across this practice a few times: when people speak about their health or similar things they say this and touch ...
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2answers
64 views

Is there a word or expression to describe a desperate act of “trying to be different”?

In the introduction of my paper/letter to a scientific journal, I would like to describe that, in a particular area of research, there are a lot of new methods presented during the last years, that ...
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2answers
1k views

Term for words like “Hanky-Panky” [duplicate]

Is there a name for these kind of doubled words? For example: hanky-panky flim-flam hoity-toity boo-hoo zig-zag Note that some rhyme and others do not.
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0answers
63 views

Can the word “Sails” in any meaningful way equate to the number Six? [closed]

Either historically, or even up through leetspeak, can it be understood by a group of English speaking people to stand-in for the number 6, and if so, how? It's understood that – for example purposes ...
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2answers
30 views

Near-universally vs nearly universally

Concerning style, usage, and correctness: what is the difference in meaning (and therefore usage & correctness) between these two phrases? A quick search reveals both are in use. Also, what ...
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0answers
36 views

What does the word 'brow' mean in descriptive prose or poetry? [closed]

The dictionary says that it can refer to the eye brows or the forehead. But when writers talk about a person's 'furrowed brow', or 'wrinkled brow', what exactly are they referring to? Clearly, ...
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2answers
86 views

Did I hear rightly – “Shiite Houthis are stated in to return the President to office.”

The answer would be very likely "No." I’ve been listening to AP Radio news, and heard the news of May 15 reporting the outcome of cease-fire negotiation between Saudi-led forces and Shiite Houthis as ...
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6answers
652 views

Can you sort by random?

This is the quote from Linux sort utility manual: -R, --random-sort sort by random hash of keys Isn't this a form of oxymoron? How can you sort by random, if usually random lists are ...
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10answers
1k views

I need one word that describes something as both (1) necessary/essential and (2) not sufficient/non-comprehensive/lacking

I need one word that could roughly describe or imply something as both (1) necessary/essential/fundamental/foundational and (2) not sufficient/non-comprehensive/lacking/in need/primitive The word ...
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3answers
33 views

Phrases with “To work”

Can I say this? I am not sure about the two phrases with "to work" "my aspiration is to live and study in a pluralistic environment and, then, to work towards a career in working with the main global ...
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4answers
1k views

“You belong to me” or “You belong with me” [closed]

What's the difference between the titular expressions? if any, at all. Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries could not help!!
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0answers
34 views

Origins of “from the outside” (to mean from the beginning)

I came across a sentence that went something like this: I wish I'd known about this from the outside - I would have done a better job. I've heard "from the outside" used like this before a ...
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0answers
50 views

Is “And this X?” a common English expression?

In Spanish we say, "And this X?" as a short form for "And who is X?" Example: When I entered the room with Billy, Tom looked up and said, "And this high school brat?" Is this also a common ...
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2answers
46 views

“Tell apart” with “Could” [closed]

I'm familiar with phrase "Tell somebody apart" used with "could" in negative, i.e. : They were so different that I couldn't tell them apart. My questions are: Can "Tell apart" be used with ...
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3answers
80 views

Is there an expression to describe “thin”?

Is there an expression in English for a thin old woman which corresponds to "Dry as a root" in French?
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2answers
41 views

What are the different resources to announce a digression?

I'm writing a paper, and I want to add a digression to enrich the line of argumentation. I can't find good figures or resources to announce that I will introduce a digression. I came across eggresion ...
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1answer
132 views

Is there a phrase, word or saying when one 'has the thought or feeling of causing hurt of mischief" despite never dreaming of acting on it?

For example I was assisting my sister in photographing a wedding. We were taking pictures as the bride was getting ready and I noticed a ketchup bottle on the kitchen table and the following popped in ...
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3answers
1k views

Is there a word or phrase for a nursing mother not biologically related to the baby she breastfeeds?

Nowadays he have human milk banks. In the olden days, however, it was not unusual to see a woman nurse the child of another mother who couldn't produce her own milk. Is there a word or phrase for a ...
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1answer
76 views

“Sir or Madam” vs “Madam or Sir” in formal letter

In a formal letter addressed to one or more unknown recipients, "Dear Sir or Madam" is the customary salutation. As a German native speaker, who is used to "Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren", writing ...
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1answer
44 views

Is “Chicago sunroof” a real expression?

The expression is from "Better Call Saul". It was defined in the season finale: defecating into a car through an open sunroof as a prank So far, the only resource I've found that corroborates ...
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10answers
1k views

Is there a word or an idiom for barging in a room with anger?

Opening a door frustrated and rushing in like you are about to scold someone inside... Barging in a room with anger. Is there a word or idiom for that, other than storm in?
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1answer
40 views

“Going above and beyond to assist” is this correct?

I'm writing a thank you note to a colleague who came in from vacation to assist me. Is this correct grammar: "Thank you for going above and beyond to assist in resolving the matter!"
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1answer
36 views

How to say that the navigation is approximate?

I have an app that is an index for businesses, so the user can search for a business and navigate to that business. I have two types of coordinates to the business: Accurate coordinates, which ...
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2answers
80 views

Origin of “blew his brains out” [closed]

I was thinking to myself, when suddenly a thought occurred to me: When was the first usage of "blew his brains out"? Example as used in sentence: He put the shotgun in his mouth with one shell in ...
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4answers
41 views

Words for adding to beginning and end of list, and beginning and end of node

Say, I have a small list of numbers: [2,4]. (I'm using a bit of math/code notation, but the idea is the same) If I were to add '0' to the beginning I would have [0,2,4]. I believe this is known as ...
3
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4answers
252 views

Is there a word for someone who is not aware of how pretty or handsome he/she is? [closed]

Is there a word or an idiom that describes someone who is beautiful but unaware of it?
0
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1answer
40 views

Usage of “scared,” “fear of,” “afraid of/to,” and “concerned to” [closed]

Could anybody please explain me when can I use 'afraid', 'fear of', 'scared', 'concern', 'worried' to express a situation that i can't handle or out of my reach? Explain also please which one of the ...
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5answers
122 views

Is there a specific term for when you get offended by a criticism which wasn't meant for you?

For example, person A says something not directed towards anyone in particular, but it was a criticism nonetheless, and it was intentionally meant to indirectly tell off some people. Person B takes ...
4
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4answers
750 views

Is there a word for lying on the bed peacefully, all your muscles relaxed?

Is there a word or an idiom for lying on the bed peacefully and happy? Throwing yourself down on bed arms wide open, all your muscles relaxed and staring at the ceiling with a happy smile like ...
4
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1answer
145 views

How to describe your feelings when someone else is treated unfairly?

For example, your female colleague experienced discrimination at work. You 'feel for her', and you're mad at the injustice in the system too. It's more than that you feel sorry for her-- on top of ...
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1answer
32 views

Everyone should have a trapdoor

What does this phrase mean ? A getaway? A safe place? Saw in a sig video I know she said something about homeless people (joke) but wondering if a deeper meaning too?
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2answers
86 views

What is a word for “people who converse”? [closed]

What is a word for "people who converse"? I'm trying to write a pretty long essay for my English class, but I can't figure out what this word is.
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2answers
32 views

Short phrase to convey “but consider the source”

Is there a short phrase (one to three words), Latin or otherwise, that conveys "but consider the source"? For example, "I heard that pigs fly on television (your phrase here)." I'm thinking perhaps ...
2
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3answers
63 views

What is the hand gesture called when you knock down your opponent in a fight?

Is there a word or an idiom for the hand gesture, done after finishing a task successfully or after knocking down the opponent in a fight? The one like wiping off the dust from your hands, which ...