Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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1answer
28 views

Origin of “Every dollar you spend is a political act”?

Who was the first to say this? Every dollar you spend is a political act. I find it here and there and it seems like a quote, but I can't find the origin.
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0answers
14 views

“To die being hit” vs “to die from being hit.” [migrated]

What the difference between the two? Which is more commonly used by native speakers of English? Example: It’d be tragic, don’t you think? To die (from) being hit by an apple.”
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2answers
39 views

Is the word “could” actually used frequently? [on hold]

I heard that the word "could" is so polite ,dead language expression that in english people don't wanna use this . can everyone tell me am i right ?
-1
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1answer
28 views

is it is correct to mention PhD in brackets or with upper line to express ongoing degree.(PhD) ̅

is it is correct to write PhD as suffix in brackets or with upperline to express the degree is ongoing. is there any reference for this type of expressions
5
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11answers
671 views

Is there a common expression for “origin of everything”? What could it be?

In some languages there is a common pathetic hyperbole that goes like "the origin of origins" or "beginning of beginnings". Is there anything similar in English [or Latin]? Context: consider a ...
1
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4answers
65 views

Answer for “You know what?”

Could 'Yes' be the answer for 'You know what?' I mean: A: 'You know what?' B: 'Yes.' C: 'I won the first prize.' I'm not sure if I bother to write 'Yes' between A's words.
0
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2answers
36 views

“Same old story,” vs “old story.”

Example: Maybe it's the old story, maybe he just sees me as a friend. Maybe it's the same old story, maybe he just sees me as a friend. Which version is more commonly used by native ...
0
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1answer
65 views

In the 2011 film bad teacher, there is an exchange between several characters:

Elizabeth: You must be Carl? Thank you for meeting me on such short notice. Carl: Of course. Sure.. Carl: Did you find the boys okay? Was it a good drive? Elizabeth: Great ...
9
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10answers
1k views

What's the word for the facial expression over an unexpected disappointment?

If your friend says something sarcastic to you unexpectedly when you are talking about something that makes you exited or your innermost feelings and makes you feel stupid. What's the most widely ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Put down good money, meaning and derivation? [on hold]

Where does the expression: "Put down good money" come from, and what is its present day usage?
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0answers
23 views

“SIX MONTHS AFTER: How far so good?” This is my Feature Article Caption, is it appropriate? [on hold]

Six months ago a new management team were sent to oversee the activities of a government agency where I work. I want to write an article for publication in the agency's newsletter appraising their ...
0
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0answers
30 views

can the adjective “sexist” be replaced by “chauvinistic” in this context?

"the nature of these rituals generates a sexist mentality among the new members" can "chauvinistic" denote the same meaning as "sexist" in this phrase?
0
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1answer
35 views

(To) be over: when it is used? [on hold]

I'd like to know when I can use the expression to be over and if it can be used to say, for instance, the light is over, in the meaning of I can't see the light 'cause I'm in a bad period. Or should I ...
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3answers
46 views

A formal way to express “many things go out of control”? [on hold]

In an opportunistic and alcohol motivated party many things go out of control "Many things go out of control" is common use, I could not find a proper way to express it in Formal English.
0
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0answers
31 views

“This isn't the place for you” meaning?

Would you say that this line is an indirect way of telling someone they shouldn't come/be somewhere? Or if not indirect, maybe some other adjective?
4
votes
2answers
96 views

What does “in the name of…” actually mean?

Whats the meaning of the phrase; "In the name of"? For example : whatever you ask in my name, Ask in my name. Oxford actually has an entry for the phrase, but it doesn't seem to match how it's used ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the formality of “hard to read at spots”? [on hold]

I have seen some people using the expression "hard to read at spots" for stating that some parts of a text are unclear (or that some reading conditions are negatively affecting the understanding of ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Meaning of “fact of nature” in a paragraph

A friend of mine is translating a text about the Millennial Generation and asked me about the meaning of "fact of nature" in the excerpt "technology wasn't a fact of nature at these times". It is part ...
1
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3answers
54 views

A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. My supervisor told me it is informal English, but I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment ...
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1answer
55 views

“You look like your brother” or “Your brother looks like you”? [on hold]

My friends are always saying stuff like, "You look like your brother ," or "Your brother looks like you." My brother is 4 years younger than me and I really can't see the resemblance; but it got me ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Be authentic synonym of not having a mask?

In Spanish, we say that we all have a mask as we are not 100% authentic (at least all the time). Is that expression correct in English?
3
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2answers
233 views

Does “morning sickness” only relate to pregnancy? Did it always?

As far as I'm aware, "morning sickness" as a phrase relates specifically to pregnancy. So, even if you have a medical condition causing regular nausea/vomiting when you wake up and you typically wake ...
2
votes
4answers
118 views

What do you call a phone call with no one talking on the other side

Is there a word or expression describing a phone call when the caller doesn't hang up, but also doesn't say anything (or at least nothing can be heard)? I'm specifically looking for a term describing ...
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2answers
46 views

“To which”, “by which”, “on which” etc [closed]

I have come across the phrases like "to which","for which", "by which", "on which" and so on(using a preposition with a relative pronoun). e.g. The chair on which the body was found.. Could someone ...
0
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1answer
37 views

What does “The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures.” mean?

The following sentence is from the "The Algorithm Manual" book The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures. What does the green to the power of ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Examples of open-ended question on product enquiry [closed]

i need your help on an assignment given to us in school. I need examples of open ended questions on product inquiries. I have some examples i came up with but i don't want to keep using Do you in ...
1
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2answers
91 views

“Robust” as a noun

Can an adjective "robust" be a noun in a sentence? And if it can't how would you say with one word "robust fellow" that can be applied to both man and woman? Because as I understand "robust fellow", ...
1
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1answer
37 views

how can Use the title 'Mr'

Use of titles in English language, can we use title Mr if we use the designation like Secretary Sports Mr Saleem Akhtar, etc, or we skip it. i am asking in reference to make a news report or news ...
0
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2answers
49 views

Another way of saying “escaping/running away from home”?

I know you can say breaking out from prison. How about ways of saying escaping/running away from home? Example: Speaker A: “What?” I said to Tom on the phone. “What do you mean Mary ran away?” ...
0
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0answers
22 views

“On the one after,” vs “on the one that followed.”

Which one is more common, more idiomatic? Example: My brother's exams would end next week, so we decided to take the trip on the one after. My brother's exams would end next week, so we ...
0
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1answer
19 views

Paternity vs. Paternal vs. Parental Leave [closed]

Which one is the most commonly used to describe a leave taken by a father in the United States?
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0answers
26 views

Is there a short (1-2 words) term for “skip your opponent's next turn”?

In the context of a 2 player board game in a light fantasy setting, imagine a game effect that makes a player go twice or skip the opponent's turn. So instead of each player taking one turn (or ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Actual origin of the name Finagle's law

Finagle's law states that Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong at the worst possible moment. It is commonly attributed to SF editor John Campbell. Did he actually coin the phrase, or did he ...
3
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4answers
107 views

What can we call “ an employee who is under-productive but the quality of his work is enviable”

A pleasant expression for an employee who has remained under-productive despite several feedback. (QUANTITATIVELY WORST) There are workers who are unable to churn up BIG numbers but the ...
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9answers
670 views

English equivalent of saying “Don’t get in between the nail and the flesh”?

The saying “Don’t get in between the nail and the flesh” from my own language is typically addressed to someone who likes to provide unsolicited help by barging in on a heated conversation between two ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Less derogatory term for dump

I’m making a (multiple-)photo editing web-app, and there is a certain feature which allows users to sort of “hibernate” their accounts and log out, allowing them to pick up exactly where they left off ...
1
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1answer
66 views

Grammaticality of “If to speak about” [duplicate]

I was wondering if it is correct to use the expression if to speak about. For example, suppose we wanted talk about one subject and then change it to another one: These are very dangerous ...
3
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1answer
55 views

Making sense of a sentence in a politcal economy article

Reading this critical geopolitical economic article, I found myself troubled understanding this sentence: "Markets have priced in nothing bad from here to as far as the eye can see." Here's the ...
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2answers
173 views

Why do people say 'buck' for a dollar?

I grew up in South Africa. When someone said something costs 'two bucks' it meant two rand (like saying two dollars, but South African currency). It made perfect sense, as the 1 Rand coin had an ...
0
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2answers
59 views

Is there a difference between a spigot and a faucet (usage in AmE) [duplicate]

What is a domestic tap called commonly in the US ? -a spigot? a device that controls the flow of liquid from a large container (MW) Dictionary meaning aside, I had this understanding that a ...
1
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1answer
74 views

Looking for a word or phrase to describe 2 things that are moving toward each other, but never meet?

I was thinking about physics today and there was an idea where if 1 object splits into 2. And If each object is moving away from each other at the speed of light. And if just a moment after they ...
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1answer
39 views

“We proceed to a further generalization…” removing stuffy language from a technical paper [closed]

I am a math major, but sometimes I read the stuffy language in these papers and I really crack up. The worst part is, when I start writing I do exactly the same thing. Certain phrases used over and ...
3
votes
2answers
70 views

Is “manually talented” a thing, linguistically-speaking?

Came across "[these people are] manually talented" in an English language test.The context was a group of people who were good at karate or ballgames, but also origami, pottery, sculpting, etc. To ...
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3answers
73 views

Call In/For a New Job

Suppose I looked for a job on the Internet, found a few offers interesting and decided to call the phone numbers they had posted. Am I calling in or calling for the new jobs? (Or should I simply say ...
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5answers
1k views

“Finnish Swedes” or “Swedish Finns”?

In Finland, there live 5.6 % Swedes (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/fi.html). They have lived there for many generations, being standard Finnish citizens, just ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Type of spurious reasoning which ignores other effects of a counterfactual

Consider a male athlete who is a reasonably skilled 100 metres sprinter, with a best time around 10.3 seconds. Probably not enough to make a career in track and field, but faster than the women's 100 ...
0
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0answers
33 views

“It was always a question for me…”

Is it correct to use the phrase "It was always a question for me..." ? For example, "It was always a question for me that no one liked the cake." or "It was always a question for me why no one liked ...
0
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3answers
53 views

What does ' Loyalty gave way to desire and Garrett' mean? [closed]

I am wondering what this expression means. It is from the movie 'Flipped' and here is the rest of the sentence. 'Loyalty gave way to desire and Garrett, the turncoat told Sherry what I was up to.' In ...
0
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1answer
68 views

What does “flavor” mean in the field of Information Technology? [closed]

I often notice the word flavor being used on the Web. I'm from Russia, and this word is generally translated into Russian as the equivalent of 'impression', 'taste' etc. However, these translations ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Charles Bukowski's “best dick” [closed]

I am reading Charles Bukowski's Pulp and as non-native English speaker I am finding decoding certain expressions challenging. For example the main character, Nicky Belane, often refers to himself ...