Expressions are words or phrases used to convey an idea, or else a particular term used conventionally to express something.

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“Try me”: Too Sexually Suggestive and “Slangy” for Retail Marketing?

Is the expression “Try Me” inappropriately sexually suggestive and “slangy” for use in retail marketing? A client wants an expression for use on a sticker for an electronic device in a retail store ...
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31 views

usage of the verb to bridge in “Bridging someone to something”

My friend suggested a tag line for our project: "Bridging you to your dream higher education online" and I have doubts that "bridging you to smth." is a proper word usage. I've never heard this ...
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5answers
2k views

Is there a non-romantic phrase for missing someone? [on hold]

The phrase "I miss you" can be equivocal: suggestive of (a) romantic longing and/or (b) regret of loss. Certainly, context can shape its meaning, including geography, historical period, and the ...
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0answers
32 views

Do these phrases have any sense? [on hold]

To besmirch the honor of mr. Johnson. When we compare mr. Johnson with mr. Jackson, we disrespect the latter one (is it understandable that 'the latter one' refers to mr. Jackson?).
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2answers
35 views

Is “on-parade” an actual term?

A google search came up with almost nothing. Am I just imaging things? I could have sworn one could use the term "on-parade" to mean a succession of something. For example: Life is an on-parade of ...
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3answers
43 views

How to verbalize a mathematics expression in English?

How do we express a simple mathematics equation in a way that could be understood by most people bad in mathematics? I have a formula like this: Processing Fee = Base Fee x ( Your Bid / Original ...
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1answer
41 views

When did “out of” come to mean “in”?

When I was a child, I learned that the term "out of" could be used to apply to a person or thing to describe where he, she or it was from. For example, a ship docked in Miami could be described as ...
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1answer
22 views

“delivered effort” versus “deliberate effort”

If someone has written, "a delivered effort to do something," is it a typo where the intended word was "deliberate" or is it its own turn of phrase?
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1answer
38 views

Difference between “I will call you” and “I give you a call”?

What is the difference between I will call you and I give you a call?
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109 views
+200

Origin of the phrase “mother's ruin”?

I was under the impression that the phrase "mother's ruin" came from the England in the 1800's, where many people living in London did so in absolute poverty, and gin (the so-called "mother's ruin") ...
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3answers
43 views

A Replacement for “Free tour guide”

In France, there are people who welcome tourists into cities in a free manner, where said tourists do not need to pay for a guided visit around town, who are introduced to the local scene without ...
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4answers
47 views

A better statment for “Get back to me” [on hold]

I would like to know if there is a better statement for expressing the following statement in an email, "Please get back to me if you have any query".
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2answers
36 views

to be above board

I have made 2-year apprenticeship as a multilingual correspondent. One expression that I came across but is still unclear to me is: "to be above board" or "He is above board" I have looked it up on ...
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1answer
68 views

What does “where's waldo” mean in this context?

The student thinks that he can where's waldo their way to the answer Now, does it mean it's gonna be a cinch or a sisyphean task? Again, if I add a little detail, The student thinks that he ...
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3answers
49 views

Principle Of Life

Hi guys I want to understand what is meant by this expression: I often asked myself, did the principle of life proceed? This sentence came in the following context: When I had arrived at ...
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1answer
58 views

Is there more than a 'double' whammy?

I have three (could grow to be more) bad reasons for a situation and I wondered if there is such a thing as a triple whammy that is an extension of the double whammy. From my research online, a triple ...
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2answers
31 views

Suitable expression for value in defeat?

When someone loses a match, I want to tell him that this loss can make him strong, that in the end this will help him to be a winner. Is there any expression in English for defeat is the ...
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2answers
47 views

Succinct way to describe “clocking in” page on a web app

A Swedish colleague has asked for my suggestion for web app page titles. The task has left me and a fellow native speaker stumped... The answers should apply to British and American English. A page ...
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8answers
3k views

How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?

Perhaps I should make it clear: - He naturally attracts girls. - He doesn't chase girls and have no intention for any relationship. - You just see him often together with girls.
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2answers
60 views

a word for “time to self-destruct” [on hold]

Is there a word which means "It's time to self destruct" or "It's time to die" or "Your time is over on earth" ? For example, what would person 1 tell another person 2, when person 2 is on her/his ...
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1answer
24 views

At the beginning of “The hands of Mr. Ottermole” by Thomas Burke, an expression 'discolored themselves', which I can't simply understand

Murder (said old Quong)—oblige me by passing my pipe—murder is one of the simplest thing in the world to do. Killing a man is a much simpler matter than killing a duck. Not always so safe, perhaps, ...
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3answers
57 views

A more formal way of saying “pointing out”

The goal of an edge detection algorithm is identifying pixels that belong to an edge of an object in an image ... The rest of the sentence should say something along the lines of "and point ...
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2answers
362 views

What's the term for expressions like “man's man” or “lawyer's lawyer”?

To indicate an exemplar or someone well-respected within their own group or occupation, sometimes you see expressions like "man's man" or "lawyer's lawyer." Is there a name for this construction? ...
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2answers
61 views

Knocked up, two very different meanings. But why and how did the phrase split? [duplicate]

In American English, "Knocked up" means "pregnant." I just found out via an article regarding jobs that no longer exist that in British English, they use use the phrase "Knocked up in a completely ...
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1answer
45 views

Bora Bora, Here We Come

Saw this phrase/expression in CIBC advertisement. The pleased client asked, "should we re-investment or expand", and the bank clerk said, "you can do both", then the old lady in the back happily ...
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6answers
2k views

What's a “brace” in the expression “brace yourself”? [closed]

I know the meaning of the expression, "brace yourself," and also the meaning of the word "brace" but I don't understand why they have that word in that expression and what its origin or history is. ...
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4 views

Insert or Enter? [migrated]

What is the difference between Insert and Enter? If I have a form to fill in, which legend is better? Insert your data or Enter your data Thanks, Nk
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2answers
70 views

What does “Bunk over” mean?

Here ia a quote from The Avengers, 2012 film. Stark : The next building is gonna say "Potts" on the tower. Pepper : On the lease. Stark : Call your mom. Can you bunk over? Q. "The building is ...
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2answers
86 views

What does “it's all on you” mean?

I just wonder if "It is on you" can mean "It is because of you". This phrase is from Tony Stark in The Avengers, 2012 film. Common and natural saying in English-speaking countries?
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56 views

Is there a difference between “Wrong or Right” and “Right or Wrong”

I was writing about the difference between morals and ethics when i wrote the following line both these terms talk about the right and wrong conduct of people both these terms talk about the ...
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1answer
202 views

“what's in store” vs. “what's in stall”

I think this is probably just one of those phrases people get wrong, such as "for all extensive purposes" - but I just found this on a cafe web page: This question asks the meaning of "in store" ...
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2answers
61 views

How to emphasize “I would rather”

I would like to emphasize the expression "I would rather... than ...". My native language is French, and in French we would say something like "I would rather 1000 times.... than", so I'm looking for ...
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1answer
180 views

It all started in Australia where the first real black swan was spotted

Definition of 'Black Swan' An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult to predict. This term was popularized by Nassim ...
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75 views

Why do the words ducky and jake mean fine or satisfactory?

Even the Merriam-Webster dictionary acknowledges both ducky and jake as acceptable terms meaning fine or satisfactory and it dates the word ducky back to 1897 and jake to 1914. Does anyone know how ...
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7 views

What does “pot-kettle situation” mean? [migrated]

I heard an expression in an episode of White Collar where a girls says to the buttler: - "Seems we have pot-kettle situation..." I have but vague speculations on what that could be based on the ...
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2answers
96 views

Meaning of 'All doubtless nourish the soul, but not all fatten the wallet'

I was going through an article on The Economist about returns of higher education and comparison of returns of various fields of study when I encoutered aforementioned phrase. It was quoted in the ...
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5answers
97 views

What does “head first” mean?

There are a serial programming books whose names begin with head first such as Head First Design Patterns, Head First Java, etc. I'm not a native English speaker. What does head first mean here?
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5answers
86 views

Is this the opposite of 'making a virtue out of a necessity'?

We all know what it means to 'make a virtue out of a necessity'. The only bananas on offer at the supermarket are 'fair trade', so we buy them and then pretend to ourselves and others that we have ...
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1answer
38 views

Flattering vs. flatter [closed]

Of two sentences You are flattering me. You flatter me. Which is correct? Are both correct, or is one better than the other?
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2answers
69 views

Fickle people who agree just to annoy

During an argument one person capitulates, not because they agree, but just to irritate the other with phrases like: Yes, of course you are right etc. Is there a specific word to describe this ...
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1answer
44 views

What is the meaning of “pet au pair”?

Granted, this looks french, I've seen this used and referenced in English. I see it used a lot with dog walking businesses or pet sitting companies, although I have no idea what it means. Google ...
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0answers
39 views

What is the status of SALER?

Is SALER (as in "one who conducts an improvised sale, such as a garage sale") an emerging word? Apparently so, since it is used on the web (as you can see if you google for "garage saler"), but it has ...
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2answers
46 views

Is “that few” a correct expression?

We quite often hear the utterance "that many" as in I haven't had that many sweets! But is the opposite standard speech as well? Can one say: I don't have that few followers on Twitter! If ...
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2answers
16 views

term for the review of available technologies

I'm looking for a phrase analogous to "literature review", but referring to the review of technologies available to solve a particular problem. That is, what would I call the process of comparing the ...
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1answer
31 views

What is correct: still to be/continue to be/should be/must be? [closed]

I want to build a sentence referring to the past, present and future: The Bible was, and continues to be, instrumental in spreading God's message to mankind. The Bible was, and should still be, ...
2
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2answers
104 views

Job interview question [closed]

I'm a French man in my late 20s and I'm applying for a job for a prestigious American company. I've had a job interview with an American woman and she told me all was well but I'd have to be molded to ...
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2answers
25 views

“In its entirety” vs “in entirety”

Where should "in its entirety" be used in place of "in entirety"? Consider the following paragraphs. Which usage is correct, and is the alternative incorrect / less correct, or simply not as common? ...
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3answers
85 views

What is the English word for a 'spaghetti harvest'?

Spaghetti, traditionally, an Italian crop is now being widely grown in Britain. Can anyone say what the harvest should be called, perhaps based on the Italian.
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5answers
3k views

An aeroplane, when it leaves the ground, 'takes off'. What does a bird do?

My daughter recently had the experience of a large bird hitting her car windscreen, and smashing it, when she was doing about 70mph on a motorway. Fortunately the bird did not come through the screen, ...
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1answer
13 views

Use “scope” to refer to a book's sections

I would like to know whether it is correct or not to use the word "scope" to refer to a book's section, subsection or paragraph. For instance We will address these matters in the next scope.