Choosing the best phrase for a particular context or meaning.

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0
votes
2answers
89 views

Butchering criticism?

Could "butcher" work as criticism? “I doubt [we'll be hearing from him], especially after we butchered him in that interview,”
4
votes
2answers
124 views

Word for the situation of being unable to pass opposing pedestrian, as you both start to step same direction

Is there a word or expression in English, which describes the situation, when you can't pass a stranger, who is walking towards you on the street, because you both start to step the same direction? ...
0
votes
5answers
75 views

“Knowledge of” vs. “Knowledgeable in”

How would I phrase this in a job description? Would I use "knowledge of" or "knowledgeable in"? Knowledge of navigating through large databases.
1
vote
3answers
55 views

A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. My supervisor told me it is informal English, but I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

“You look like your brother” or “Your brother looks like you”? [closed]

My friends are always saying stuff like, "You look like your brother ," or "Your brother looks like you." My brother is 4 years younger than me and I really can't see the resemblance; but it got me ...
0
votes
3answers
91 views

Word for someone who feels complete again, but not in the same way as they once were

I am writing a story about a girl who once was complete, but now has lost what made her feel whole. She has tried to replace it with the same thing but failed. Now she has replaced it with something ...
-1
votes
2answers
75 views

“These are [one/ones] of the foundations…” - which “one” should I use?

I'm having a hard time picking between These are one of the foundations of.... and These are ones of the foundations of.. Or is there a more idiomatic way to express it?
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Less derogatory term for dump

I’m making a (multiple-)photo editing web-app, and there is a certain feature which allows users to sort of “hibernate” their accounts and log out, allowing them to pick up exactly where they left off ...
2
votes
5answers
132 views

A simile / metaphor for the concept that an entity is formed from a wide range of factors

I am trying to explain that health is not simply determined by biological factors. Instead it is shaped by a whole host of variables: lifestyle, education, culture, attitudes, socio-economic factors ...
0
votes
2answers
133 views

“Technology” vs. “a technology”

(Company) develops transactional data technology that aggregates information for payment service providers and merchants. or (Company) develops a transactional data technology that ...
10
votes
10answers
1k views

An appropriate term for the 'contamination' of a language

Italians, for some reason, tend to accept and use foreign terms quite easily. The foreign terms that have entered and are entering common usage are mainly from the English language. Their usage has ...
6
votes
8answers
136 views

Expression for personality/lifestyle of somebody that likes to step outside of the comfort zone?

This is maybe a difficult question. In my mother tongue we have a word for it, but I can not find anything similar in english: How to describe a person/characteristic/way of life of somebody that ...
9
votes
4answers
854 views

What would you call that feeling of something crawling on the body

Morgellons is a controversial and poorly understood condition in which unusual thread-like fibers appear under the skin. The patient may feel like something is crawling, biting, or stinging ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

'Delays expected until November'; what ought they to say instead?

Where there are major roadworks on British roads you often see signs which say something like Delays expected until November. Everyone knows what it means i.e. that between now and November, if you ...
14
votes
12answers
3k views

Ways of saying “You don't have to be a rocket scientist” [closed]

I'm trying to find different ways of saying that "You don't have to be a rocket scientist", but I can't seem to get any good ideas. I got a variation, "You don't have to be a brain surgeon...," but ...
0
votes
5answers
2k views
-1
votes
0answers
135 views

What do you call the phenomenon when a negative reflection is favored over a positive one?

Is there a word or expression which expresses the idea of a bias towards a negative reflection (e.g. negative judgement/criticism) rather than a positive one (e.g. appreciation/supporting comment)? As ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

“You should know” is it going beyond respect? [closed]

I'm going to start a informatic video series named "#YouShouldKnow" inspired from "Did You Know" but I think the name is getting little harsh and disrespectful, but I am confused Is this name Ok ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant, how do I express that? [duplicate]

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant to the given question, how can I express it more clearly? I am not able to come up with an appropriate word to describe what I wish to describe, a few ...
4
votes
11answers
896 views

How to describe a person in a situation in which he does not completely know what he is doing?

How can we describe a person doing or communicating something without (really) knowing what he is doing or talking about? This could be either because of some indisposition like for example ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...
2
votes
3answers
333 views

How to say “I met someone”, but not in the romantic way [closed]

I sometimes start stories with "I met someone who (...)" or "I met a man who (...)". Being a woman, people often seem to think there is something romantic about the meeting even though that was not ...
6
votes
5answers
877 views

What is an expression for a priest not wearing official attire?

Is there an English expression for a priest or monk not wearing his religious attire? (any Christian doctrine, or even more general). Clarification: I'm trying to say that someone looks like an ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Proper usage of 'Come to lunch' & 'Come for lunch'?

I told a colleague of mine that since she didn't 'come to lunch', hence no sweets for her. She corrected the sentence to 'come for lunch'. So which one is the proper usage ?
9
votes
13answers
971 views

Historical or literary examples of misguided or botched attempts to help that end up causing harm [duplicate]

I'm looking for examples from history, folklore, literature, movies, or pop culture, of situations in which a person or group attempted to do something helpful but, due to their own poor judgment, ...
2
votes
3answers
107 views

sentence construction where non-restrictive clause uses a conjunction

It gave John, a new hire to the company and now a director, a good start. It gave John, a new hire to the company who is now a director, a good start. The non-restrictive clause uses "and" ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Is “By one side, …, by the other side” a correct expression?

I've come across the formulation by one side, by other side instead of on the one hand/side and on the other hand/side. I strongly suspect this to be wrong and maybe Brazilian Portuguese originated, ...
3
votes
2answers
179 views

Sorry I didn't turn up, I clean forgot. What's the sense of "clean' and its usage hygiene? [closed]

Sorry I didn't turn up -I clean forgot. The explosion blew the cooker clean through the wall. What kind of usage is this- AmE or BrE ? The meaning of clean usually refers to removing ...
6
votes
14answers
1k views

Opposite of “out of date”? [closed]

Can anyone think of a phrase we would use to describe a situation where something is the opposite of "out of date"; that is, it's "too new"? For example, a banana that's been sitting around for ages ...
1
vote
4answers
356 views

A phrase for two characters that are unmistakably similar

I am looking for a phrase that compares two characters that share very similar attributes and characteristics. Prufrock and Hamlet truly are [ ... ] I don't want something like "very much ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

“Degree of Proximity” or “Proximity of Blood” or “Relation Proximity”?

I'm translating a civil record to English, which has a table of information about a family registry. One of the titles is "Degree of Proximity", however I'm not sure which of the expressions suits the ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

Phrase for “putting one's plans into action”

I am looking for a phrase, metaphor, or cliche to mean "putting one's plans into action". I am using it in the following sentence. As the events of the play proceed, however, Hamlet becomes ...
0
votes
4answers
93 views

A proper substitute to “highly reactive” [closed]

I have to use the expression " highly reactive" a lot in my everyday writings. Can there be another word or phrase to put it better and which still connotes the correct meaning. Plutonium is a ...
10
votes
10answers
2k views

Is there a word for something loved by the masses but whose true value is lacking?

Is there a general word for someone or something popular or loved by the masses but that has not been proven to be effectual (like how some would use the term "pop psychology" pejoratively)? Examples ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?

On Meta.Travel.SE, we have a debate whether our 'Korea' tag should be mapped to 'South Korea'. One of the answers - from the moderator who made the synonym mapping - is that common usage of the word ...
1
vote
4answers
93 views

Middle ground between “I'll live with it” and “Bring it on!”?

The context is a typical conversation. You've settled for a course of action and expressed yourself accordingly. Then you get from someone a warning of sorts about potential risks or consequences ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

He stayed a week vs he stayed for a week

He stayed a week vs He stayed for a week I consider her my friend vs I consider her as my friend. I don't know whether he can be there vs I don't know if he can be there I often hear ...
1
vote
5answers
134 views

“Only the good die young.” Negative or Positive? [closed]

I've heard this expression before. I can't tell if its used as a positive one or a negative one? When is it appropriate to use this expression? Is it implying that people that live to be an old age ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

“Can't you see the person is embroidering?” - idiomaticity and alternatives?

Two persons, who were not privy to a scene, are now observing two others who are talking: [...] [one of the former, reacting to something that was just said] -Why did she/he say that!? ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.
0
votes
2answers
243 views

“at the cost of” vs. “at the expense of”

I usually use "at the cost of", but my editor made it "at the expense of". For example, the following sentence: The counts in Table 2 are all based on implementations that are optimized for ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Shut your mouth

I’m confused regarding these expressions: Shut up Shut your mouth Shut your mouth up Shut up your mouth After some research, I’ve come to believe they are all correct except “Shut ...
1
vote
4answers
331 views

What is the expression for “high fever”?

It can not be high/low according to my understanding. Fever is fever. He is suffering from fever of high temperature. He is suffering from high fever.
0
votes
3answers
75 views

Walk across/through/on the crosswalk?

What is the correct collocation here? Do you walk across the crosswalk, through the crosswalk, or on the crosswalk? Or can you say cross the crosswalk?
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“To the next time” vs. “Till the next time” [closed]

Could you tell me which form is correct, and why? to the next time, name till the next time, name
2
votes
2answers
248 views

Should I use “half the time” or “half of the time”? [closed]

If I wanted to say that someone finished in 30 minutes when they had one hour to complete a given task, should I say "he did it in half the time" or "he did it in half of the time"?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Is it common to use the phrase “come with” without specifying with whom [duplicate]

We’re going to the pub. Want to come with?” I have heard this from an American colleague. Though this sounds odd to the majority of us, however, since I am not sure of the usage, I am asking how ...
3
votes
3answers
52 views

another way to express “not limited to”

Not limited to X, the issue also affects Y. What could substitute "not limited to" other than not restricted to/bounded to? I overused these words and looking for simple substitutes.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“take the initiative” vs “make the initiative”

What is the difference between "taking the initiative" and "making the initiative"? Context : I recently sent an email asking advice on whether I should "take the initiative to contact X". The person ...