Choosing the best phrase FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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1
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1answer
67 views

Other than - except for

Yesterday I used the sentence: "I know people except (for) you." and I have been told that the correct version is: "I know people other than you." Although I have been looking at related ...
2
votes
3answers
113 views

“even more”, “even much more”, “many more”

My sentence is this: Parents teach us how to speak and interact in social situations and even more. I would like to know how to say "and a lot of other things" at the end of my sentence. I have ...
4
votes
4answers
5k views

“take the initiative” vs “make the initiative”

What is the difference between "taking the initiative" and "making the initiative"? Context : I recently sent an email asking advice on whether I should "take the initiative to contact X". The person ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Is there any difference between ”control of/over“ and ”power over"

For example, what to choose here? "To compete for the control of/over a corporation" or "To compete for the power over a corporation" UPDATE If two workers compete for absolute control/power, what ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“The name is” or “My name is”

What is the fundamental difference between saying "The name is X" or " My name is X" to introduce yourself? It seems that both versions are used in movies/tv shows, but as far as I recall, no one ...
37
votes
15answers
9k views

A word for a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that one cannot help but laugh

There is a word for this in Indonesian language: jayus. (Maybe, it is used in Filipino and Malaysian language also.) It is a joke that is so bad, it's funny. It is often mentioned as ...
1
vote
3answers
525 views

Single word for attributing inappropriate motives to others' actions?

Is there a single word to describe someone who often attributes inappropriately trivial/cheap motives to another person's actions? I'm thinking along the lines of someone who puts himself briefly in ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Pronouns when addressing a crowd

So recently, I have been working on a speech. Parts of this speech is a series of questions that I pose to the audience. I realize some difficulty when writing them. For example: “Who remembers ...
0
votes
4answers
91 views

“What's a nice place to go shopping?” or “Where's a nice place to go shopping?”

Which is correct: "What's a nice place to go shopping?" or "Where's a nice place to go shopping?" Why do we use "What's?" and not "Where's?"
2
votes
2answers
31 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Be successful vs good luck [closed]

Does it sound right to say "be successful" instead of "good luck" as a quick reply? For instance: A : I have a tough exam tomorrow. B : I hope you'll be successful in your exam. I suppose ...
2
votes
2answers
137 views

Is “strong medicine” idiomatic?

Is the expression “strong medicine” idiomatic? I am referring to drugs that contain a high concentration of chemicals and are used for soothing severe pains or treating severe diseases. A drug whose ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Double use of future tense after “I hope that”

I was wondering whether it was correct to use "will" twice in the following sentence: I hope that 2016 will be the year I will get to travel. Using the present tense in the second half of the ...
9
votes
2answers
597 views

What's the English for “allappare”?

This is essentially a translation question and as such off-topic, but please bear with me for a moment. Allappare is an Italian verb that is used to refer to the astringent effect that you may ...
-1
votes
2answers
186 views

What could be an appropriate word in between long-lived event and short-lived event?

I am wondering a word to express the moderated values between long-lived and short-lived events. For example, I would like to describe heat wave durations. My durations are 1hr, 2hr, 3hr, .., 10hr. I ...
0
votes
3answers
117 views

complex words indication

Splicing factors have oncogenic properties. However, their expression patterns and practical priority in gastric cancer and the difference of them between gastric cancer and colorectal cancers are ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Please help me in choosing between too / also / as well in a specific case [closed]

I cannot figure out which one is correct (This text will be placed in a real estate listing website, in an area near an already listed property, suggesting others to offer their property on the ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

How to emphasize one word more than another at the end of a sentence

Which of the following sentences emphasizes the word "crispy" more than "red"? This paper studies apples with a crispy and red exterior. This paper studies apples with a red and crispy ...
3
votes
3answers
114 views

What to say instead of “Ladies and Gentlemen”? [duplicate]

What do I say instead of Ladies and Gentlemen if there are many men and only one woman present? Should I say: Lady and Gentlemen Gentlemen and Lady Madam and Gentlemen or something else?
0
votes
2answers
154 views

Proper response to “Let's meet…” [closed]

What's the proper response to this Linda: "Let's meet outside the library." Lucy: "____" A. Is 6.30 all right? B. Yes, let's do it C. How about meeting again? D. I'd like to go to the ...
3
votes
2answers
681 views

Word for a friend you have never met?

Can anyone provide "emotional" word/phrase for a "friend" you have never met, but it feels like you really know him? I won't mind even if it was in a language other than English. :) Update: Would ...
-1
votes
2answers
85 views

What's the opposite of “in X's favor”? [closed]

If you argued your case well, the judge may rule "in your favor". What's the opposite expression? (I don't mean "dismiss your claim" or "reject your suit" etc. - I'm looking for the exact opposite ...
-1
votes
2answers
49 views

'Learn of' vs 'learn off'

I couldn't find a thread on this, so I'm asking. When you're learning facts for an exam, are you 'learning of' the facts, or 'learning off' the facts? It is possible that it may be an English or ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Is the expression “to get understood” correct?

Can I say Get yourself understood. with the sense of "make yourself understood"? Are both correct? Is there a difference in meaning between the two?
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Usage of “no longer are” vs “are no longer”

I'm writing some code and as I wrote a comment I realized I don't know which of the following forms is the correct way to phrase it: The moment there no longer are any valid blocks, the loop ...
6
votes
8answers
929 views

English equivalent for the French expression “péter de santé”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that carries pretty much the same connotation as what is implied by French "péter de santé"? WordReference actually gives for translation, "be bursting with ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“On the air” OR “On air”

Do you remember Northern Exposure? I hope so. Chris had a light-sign in his office: http://nevergoodbye.com/go/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/totalchris.gif And when you search google images for "on the ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

How to say that an incapability would have been shared by others

I'm a non-native speaker struggling with a construct that should emphasize that someone's incapability would have been shared by others. Picture a man with a stone in his shoe. He walks on and on but ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the expression 'more alike' awkward or does it work in an interface?

I want to create a button on an interface that will show me more items (cars) of the same kind (or similar in characteristics). I was thinking of 'more like this' but this is a bit too long and the ...
22
votes
6answers
5k views

Are “Fish in a barrel” and “Sitting ducks” similar?

Do the phrases "Fish in a barrel" and "Sitting ducks" convey the same thing? In my opinion, they have the same tone and express something to be an easy target. Eg: Out there, they are just fish in ...
3
votes
2answers
109 views

What do we call “easily readable books”?

I just wonder if there is a good expression to refer to an "easily readable book", like a simple short story or pocket book?
0
votes
3answers
5k views

“at the cost of” vs. “at the expense of”

I usually use "at the cost of", but my editor made it "at the expense of". For example, the following sentence: The counts in Table 2 are all based on implementations that are optimized for ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Proceed vs. Proceed further/ahead- Redundancy

In a training session on Business English, the instructor often said, proceed and proceed further, usually, after a pause by the speakers or whenever he interrupted. Examples: I ...
0
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1answer
193 views

the similar meaning of impress and strike…as

I learnt the phrase 'strike somebody as something', which means 'to seem to have a particular quality or feature'. I think it is similar to 'impress somebody with something'. Maybe it is most common ...
1
vote
3answers
49 views

Comparing two people's cleverness at a particular age

I'm trying to present a comparison of Jake's and Eric's cleverness at the age of 18 Jake is 18 years old, and Eric is 32. 1)Jake is much cleverer at 18 than Eirc was when he was 18 2)Jake is much ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Subscribe for vs subscribe to updates [closed]

What form is correct or more suitable regarding website updates?
7
votes
1answer
710 views

When expressing temperatures that are colder than freezing, do we say “more than freezing”, “less than freezing”, or something else?

So my brother and I were standing out in the cold. Brother: "Man, it's cold." Me: "Yeah, it's freezing." Brother: "Man, it's more than freezing!" Me: Slightly confused, but perhaps thinking that he ...
0
votes
2answers
129 views

“On launch” vs “at launch”

I've had a disagreement with a friend over the use of 'on' concerning the the launch of a certain product. He insists it should be 'at launch' while I believe either 'on launch' or 'at launch' is ...
1
vote
4answers
761 views

Is “Neither I you” Correct?

A friend of mine said "...I never saw you during school." For some reason I wanted to respond "Neither I you." I am certain I have heard this reply before, but, looking at it now, it does not seem ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

As cold as it was today vs as cold as it is today

I'd like to know whether all of the following sentences have the same meaning. Are all of these sentences grammatically correct? 1) Tomorrow will be twice as cold 2) Tomorrow will be twice as cold as ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Difference between 'in the wild' and 'in the wilderness'?

In I once saw a tiger in the wild. 'in the wild' sounds like an existing collocation. How about 'in the wilderness'?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

They don't like I spend time alone vs they don't like me spending time alone [duplicate]

"They don't like I spend time alone" I'm not a native speaker but I found this sentence written by non-native speaker kind of awkward and I'm wondering if this sentence is natural or grammatically ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Set X to v? or Set X as v?

I'm writing an academic paper, and would like to say that the value of X is v using imperative form. (Specifically in the algorithm section. That's why I need to use imperative.) Which among the ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Is it true that after the title (Mr), we have to add a name?

I want to know whether it's obligatory to add a name after Mr. Can we call someone with "Hey, Mr!"? Or should we should say "Mr John"? And if we don't want to mention the name, do we just say "Sir"? ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

you have confused me or you have got me confused?

You have confused me by staying quiet about it or you have got me confused by staying quiet about it? I know the latter is correct, but is the former sentence correct as well and convey the same ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

As long as… which version is better? [closed]

I want to express the following: As long as A exists, B exists. As long as B exists, C exists. It does not sound smooth to me. I was considering this version too: As long as A exists, so ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Using “of” before “whether” and general usage of “whether”

I was reading a mathematics text, and I came across a phrase which I thought was written incorrectly. There was a part of a sentence: ... it begs the question whether or not A=B. and I feel this ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Allow introducing myself vs. allow me introducing myself

In the beginning of a formal letter, which one of the followings is the correct form? Allow introducing myself. Or Allow me to introduce myself. I have a feeling that the latter is better, ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Is “Inversely Proportional” the right term here?

The effort required to design something is inversely proportional to the simplicity of the result. -Roy T. Fielding, http://roy.gbiv.com/untangled/2008/rest-apis-must-be-hypertext-driven ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Can you make the difference between 'Here you go' and 'There you go' explicit?

I think most native speakers have an implicit understanding of the difference between 'Here you go' and 'There you go', although the difference in use between these expressions is small. I'm not a ...