1
vote
3answers
37 views

Women and children

I keep seeing and hearing the expression women and children in print and on NPR when referring to a set of people in a war zone. Do they literally mean women and children? Or has that become an ...
1
vote
4answers
108 views

Expressions to describe having immediately understood someone's personality

What words could I use to describe the event of having successfully and completely "read" or understood someone's personality, upon first meeting that someone?
1
vote
2answers
37 views

A “Frankenstein's monster” similar metaphors

Although originally it's a novel character, a "Frankenstein's monster" became a metaphor for "something that cannot be controlled and that attacks or destroys the person who invented it." However, are ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

“Word for word” or “word by word”? [closed]

I have an idiom that is used in a sentence; which is correct? You are asked to copy this letter word by word. You are asked to copy this letter word for word. Which is correct?
2
votes
1answer
68 views

What does expression “speak up to the point” mean?

I just used the expression speak up to the point as a way of saying: Express without blathering Get directly to the actualy point Have I used this expression correctly? Are there any other better ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

Single word for attributing inappropriate motives to others' actions?

Is there a single word to describe someone who often attributes inappropriately trivial/cheap motives to another person's actions? I'm thinking along the lines of someone who puts himself briefly in ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

Expression/word combination for “object of application”

I need to be able to refer to an object which has/needs something applied to it or used on it. A couple of examples: one liter of paint is needed to paint an area of 10m². 6 birthday candles are ...
-1
votes
1answer
102 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
0
votes
3answers
145 views

Professional ways of saying “to know something”

Usually, in our CV or resume, we will say that "I know this, I know that, blah blah". I think the verb "to know" is not formal enough in such situation. Is there a better way to say you know ...
7
votes
5answers
943 views

Is there a word for someone who is usually in the minority?

My original question was "Is there a legitimate word for 'a balancer'?" but I think it's a little hard to understand... Let's just say there is a person, and most of the time, he is in the minority. ...
0
votes
3answers
107 views

People who use “no” in every sentence [closed]

I want to know whether using unnecessary "No"s and negations paints individuals with a negative/insulting attitude. Examples from my dear workplace. Example 1: 1: "Hey Eric, today is so warm." 2: ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

What are the correct form of the following 2 expressions

I am working on a simple application which predicts you the wake up time if you go to bed at the moment. In example: if you go to bed at 12am and set your alarm, you should set your alarm to 8am. Is ...
0
votes
2answers
107 views

How to emphasize “I would rather”

I would like to emphasize the expression "I would rather... than ...". My native language is French, and in French we would say something like "I would rather 1000 times.... than", so I'm looking for ...
-1
votes
1answer
196 views

What is correct: still to be/continue to be/should be/must be? [closed]

I want to build a sentence referring to the past, present and future: The Bible was, and continues to be, instrumental in spreading God's message to mankind. The Bible was, and should still be, ...
1
vote
3answers
80 views

What's the best way to say: “Brands who trust our work”

What's the best way to say: "Brands who trust our work" or "Brands that trust in our work"?
1
vote
3answers
174 views

Can I say “I have been nourishing my passions”?

Can I say "I have been nourishing my passions"? Or something similar to express the figurative fact that "I have been developing and nourishing them"?
1
vote
3answers
201 views

Is “Neither I you” Correct?

A friend of mine said "...I never saw you during school." For some reason I wanted to respond "Neither I you." I am certain I have heard this reply before, but, looking at it now, it does not seem ...
2
votes
3answers
235 views

One word to say to someone who's being in a state they're usually not (or doing something they never did)?

In my native language, there is a singe word to say to someone who apparently are doing something they never did before, or being in state they never were before. Like: Mr. X had always been late. ...
3
votes
1answer
272 views

Is absence of the person needed in “On someone's behalf”?

In the middle of a conversation he had with my father, [Mr. X] asked him: “What does your son want to do in future?”. “He wants to do religious studies,” my father replied. He talked on my behalf ...
15
votes
14answers
870 views

An expression for trying to futilely apply old methods that once worked

We are looking for an expression that captures this idea: When someone tries to adapt an old way of doing something, holding on to the original core of their process, in a futile way, instead of ...
2
votes
1answer
685 views

Oh my God, Oh my Lord, Oh my Gosh

What are the differences between them? Is there a cultural and/or social interference? Do young people say "Oh my Gosh" more than others?
1
vote
3answers
297 views

Expression choice: 'conclusion', 'taken as a whole', or 'regarding'

I am wondering if it would be more effective to use another construction: Taken as a whole or Regarding instead of In the general framework of the leaf photosynthesis limitations ...
0
votes
1answer
178 views

Put on a very impressive display

I found this phrase in a translation studies textbook, Veeraphol Nakonluang-Promotion put on a very impressive display to knock out defending champion Joichiro Tatsuyoshi of Japan to become the ...
0
votes
3answers
96 views

How to specify one had the topmost GPA during his education?

I am writing a CV and I want to specify that I had the best GPA among all of the students. What is the best way to write such a thing in north america? Does 'Bachelor with first class honor' work? How ...
4
votes
1answer
123 views

Who coined the term 'affluent society'?

Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, in 1957 used the term 'affluent society' to describe the rising prosperity in Britain in those years. Does anyone know of any earlier reference to the term?
1
vote
1answer
105 views

“heart advice” - jarring or beautiful?

I'm translating a Tibetan text written in verse into English. The style is one of direct advice rather than learned philosophy. My aim is for the translation to have the same down-to-earth quality as ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“take the initiative” vs “make the initiative”

What is the difference between "taking the initiative" and "making the initiative"? Context : I recently sent an email asking advice on whether I should "take the initiative to contact professor X". ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there another way of saying “less is more”?

Is there another way of saying “less is more" in the following context? They changed their packaging and left only the essential branding on it. It epitomizes "less is more".
0
votes
1answer
279 views

“sheds some important insights”?

Could we say "sheds some important insights"? E.g. The discussion sheds some important insights for optimizing an HTML parser If this is not appropriate, what is a nice way to express the same idea? ...
1
vote
0answers
108 views

How to express this idea on formal occasions [closed]

everyone. I was making an application for iPad. It's a music game that you can record and play your tracks by touch the virtual piano keyboard on screen.But in the manage view,i want to remind the ...
-1
votes
2answers
68 views

Which “one” should I use?

I'm having a hard time picking between These are one of the foundations of.... and These are ones of the foundations of.. Or is there a more idiomatic way to express it?
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Can “the fact that X” imply “X is a fact”? [closed]

A: How do I know if my professor is good? B: Do you understand what he says? A: Yes, but that might be because I'm a natural genius, and not necessarily the fact that he is good at ...
3
votes
3answers
357 views

How to describe “choose to do something by one's own willing”

For example, there is a course (say French course), for students in a college. The students can take it, but they don't have to. Someone, who is not a student in that college, thinks that this course ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

How can I rephrase “enough rope to shoot yourself in the foot”?

Some time ago I have a read a very famous book of Allen I. Holub "Enough rope to shoot yourself in the foot" (this book on openlibrary.org). I have read it in Russian and the book was titled with ...
2
votes
1answer
268 views

Why is it “the worst round one care to remember”?

I am interested in the usage of “care to infinitive verb” in the following sentence in Jeffery Archer’s fiction, “Kane & Abel”: “By the time they reached the eighteenth, Alan was eight holes ...
0
votes
3answers
640 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
2
votes
3answers
884 views

What is a common English expression for when you were very tired or out of it and said something extremely stupid?

I kept thinking of "spazzing out" but that doesn't quite seem to be it. An example is when you're very tired and kind of dozing off and you say something or ask a question that is incredibly stupid ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Shut your mouth

I’m confused regarding these expressions: Shut up Shut your mouth Shut your mouth up Shut up your mouth After some research, I’ve come to believe they are all correct except “Shut ...
5
votes
3answers
452 views

What is the behavior where one closes their nose with their lips to elude foul odour called?

I have seen this question, and it is not exactly what I'm asking. Sometimes people (most especially in developing countries) raise the tip of their lips to cover their nose when a foul odour is sensed ...
11
votes
4answers
765 views

“Who is that for?”

Showing a baby bottle to my son I ask him "Who's that for?", obviously waiting for a "That's for me!" answer (which turns out to be just "Me!") But I am not a native speaker and I kind of translate ...
4
votes
5answers
363 views

Synonym or equal phrase to “merely philosophical”

When something is bound to be of little substance, or the discussion of it surely only giving rise to opinion or sophistry, sometimes the phrase "merely philosophical" is used. In this article I'm ...
2
votes
2answers
254 views

Almost half a dozen [closed]

I understand, dozen may be more comfortable than twelve in speech. I can understand using over a dozen or almost a dozen These imply rough measurement of the count, maybe ten, maybe eleven, or maybe ...
0
votes
3answers
985 views

What's the best way to say: “which one is more true or more accurate”? [closed]

What's the best way to say: "which one is more true or more accurate" when talking about 2 words?
1
vote
0answers
325 views

How to express that simplicity should not mean to exclude necessary features? [closed]

I come from a software development background. One of the goals is to make tools easy to use. On the other hand one must/should include certain features. Now I want to argue that in order for our ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

How to say the margins of a page in a book

What is the best way to express the margins of (i) the bounded side of a page and (ii) the edge side? I see people referring to them as left margin and right margin, but they are inaccurate. On ...
11
votes
9answers
165k views

Any other good way of saying “Happy Birthday”?

Quite a few of my friends are having their birthdays in the coming weeks. I feel a little awkward posting plain words like "Happy Birthday" on their Facebook pages. I've decided I should come up with ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

How about 'play cute' or 'play adorable'?

I wonder if 'play cute' or 'play adorable' is frequently used to stand for 'act cute/adorable' in spoken language. It seems easier to google out 'act cute/adorable' instead of 'play cute/adorable'.
4
votes
6answers
6k views

Difference between “meant to” and “supposed to”

Those two expressions have close meaning: He is not meant to do this He is not supposed to do this What is the difference between them, and when I should use one or the other?
0
votes
4answers
2k views

“You are not going to be able to … ” versus “you can't …”

Are there any differences between these two expressions?