Choosing the best phrase FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning.

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1answer
35 views

complex words indication

Splicing factors have oncogenic properties. However, their expression patterns and practical priority in gastric cancer and the difference of them between gastric cancer and colorectal cancers are ...
0
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0answers
20 views

On the referent of 'during that time' / 'meanwhile'

Can during that time refer to a relatively long time? Or can during that time be used regardless of whether the span is long or short? For example, I think (1) is ok: (1) I waited for a bus for 10 ...
-3
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1answer
36 views

I lost my temper in Domino's pizza the other day and ended up pushing the bloke “behind the till” [closed]

I lost my temper in Domino's pizza the other day and ended up pushing the bloke behind the till. What is the meaning of "till" here ? Is it preferred to use such formations in general ...
0
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1answer
66 views

“The problem is that…”. Good or bad English?

I wrote a technical article in which I used (probably overused) constructions of the form "The main point is that...", "The problem is that...". As I am a native Italian speaker, these sentences have ...
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0answers
27 views

'before' vs. 'until'

Which is more appropriate? I had lived in New York for three years until/before I graduated from college. Perhaps, there may be a more appropriate expression, but if you have to use either of ...
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5answers
67 views

“next two weeks” vs. “in 14 days from now”

Which one is most appropriate and why? I will have my laptop next two weeks. Or I will have my laptop in 14 days from now.
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5answers
95 views

The solution of so/but/since and because? [closed]

What do you think about the options of this case, i hav chosen the A", it's a little tricky?
1
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1answer
57 views

What to do now- Is the statement incorrect

A novice to this "learning forum". I was working on sth that was a solution to a SQL query and it did not work out. So I uttered- What to do now. My manager, who is from Italy and whose ...
-1
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1answer
32 views

Does this sentence “Do you find your partner through your heart or brain?” express the below meaning?

Here is the meaning that I want to ask people. Ok, so, how do you choose the one you love? There are 2 types of people. The first type of people uses their feeling or emotion or heart to find love. ...
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6answers
88 views

I need a big word for 'steady', if it exists [closed]

I'm looking for some "big words" to use in a set of gifts that relate directly to the giftees and their personalities. I was able to find jocular for playful and scrupulous for diligent pretty easily, ...
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0answers
65 views

An English expression or not

I'm a little bit confused about below expressions. Can anybody tell me which expression that sounds more English native? Thank you very much! There are lots of restaurants opening/opened along the ...
1
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5answers
303 views

'Knows all the knicks and knacks of…' is this correct?

So I want to write about a company that specializes in a particular field. They've been in this field since a while now, so they know everything there is to know about the field and related to it. but ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

Idiom for: “We should attend it even if we have to borrow money.”

I'm translating a script and I should cut this line down by about half it's syllables. I should match to the lip movement of the actors on video, and so that would be about 7 syllables. It doesn't ...
2
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4answers
125 views

A shorter form of question “Did it happen by coincidence?”

Imagine one person saying: "Oh, both Mary and John called me at the same time". Another asks: "Did it happen by coincidence?". I want to find the shortest possible way of asking the same ...
1
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3answers
107 views

I can say: “You shouldn't have done this!” Can I say: “You had better not have done this!”?

Provided "should" and "had better" are near synonyms (stronger advice in "had better" than in "should" or in more formal "ought to"), I know I can say You shouldn't have done this! But how about ...
1
vote
4answers
90 views

What is the expression for a list of low importance items, part of a more important speech?

Summary: I am trying to find an expression equivalent to annonces parafiales in French I am looking for an expression which means "list of items of low importance, appended to a more important ...
5
votes
5answers
469 views

What is the best word or expression that describes the Hindi word “Jootha”? [duplicate]

Jootha is a Hindi word which means that the food, which actually belongs to me has been tasted by someone else, without my permission. In India this is considered as a taboo and states that the food ...
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2answers
37 views

How to say meeting is about my questions? [closed]

I want to ask my supervisor for a meeting. I want to say meeting is about my questions about the approach. Can I use discuss for asking questions? I would be grateful for an appointment, at your ...
2
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2answers
40 views

Short phrase to convey “but consider the source”

Is there a short phrase (one to three words), Latin or otherwise, that conveys "but consider the source"? For example, "I heard that pigs fly on television (your phrase here)." I'm thinking perhaps ...
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2answers
43 views

Best way to describe a decrease in time taken?

I have written an algorithm that greatly improves the computation time for a particular problem, but I am divided on how to best describe this in writing. As a rough guide, a process that previously ...
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0answers
46 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

How to describe a confusion matrix correctly

In computer science, we a use a thing called confusion matrix for reporting results from supervised machine learning algorithms. It looks like this The image was taken from here. I would like to ...
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3answers
170 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Lost In Punctuation

Usually, when a piece of text is translated from one language to some other language, and (due to slightly different idioms, phrases, words, etc.) the end meaning is changed, then it is attributed to ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Idiom for dabbling in extremes

Is there a suitable idiomatic expression for a situation in which a person tends to dabble in extremes? For example, he might wake up at 4:00AM on some days and wake up at 11:00 AM on others and so ...
7
votes
11answers
1k views

Idiom/expression for changing the subject in a conversation

Is there an idiom/expression in English for changing the subject in a conversation (and if possible, in a sarcastic way)? For example, there is an expression in Turkish: gelelim fasulyenin ...
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2answers
136 views

Alternative to Without further ado?

It's a cliche talk in nearly all public speaking events, regardless of the type of the gathering (academic, business, wedding) and the level/class (top League school, fortune 500 company, 200 bucks ...
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1answer
45 views

Connotations of “hungry for X” and “thirsty for X.” [closed]

Does "hungry for X" have different connotations than "thirsty for X"? I did a few Google searches and found that "hungry for X" outdoes "thirsty for X" by about 250% with most values I tried for X. ...
1
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2answers
64 views

Is “myriad” not prevalent in “day to day speech”? [duplicate]

I have noticed people using "myriad" when they mean "uncountable" or simply many. Is "Myriad" not prevalent in "day to day speech Can it be used for definite but large amount of anything.
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2answers
30 views

connecting expressions with similar words

I often face this problem in scientific papers. When writing a title I have two possibilities. For example: Enterprise and Process Modelling or Enterprise Modelling and Process Modelling Water ...
1
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1answer
236 views

Which expression is correct? “in development” or “under development”?

When talking about a product or project that is still being developed (so it's in an unfinished state at the moment), which expression is the correct one? “in development” or “under development”? For ...
1
vote
2answers
134 views

Proper usage of “passed” vs “passed away”

The current popular verb for someone who has died is to say they "passed." It sounds incorrect to me -- isn't the proper terminology "passed-away"? I've noticed that people on TV and people under 30 ...
0
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2answers
45 views

Is it idiomatic to say “I never minded about…”?

For example: "I never minded about not getting paid for it". Does this sentence sound fine or should it be "I never cared about.."?
0
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1answer
37 views

Looking for concise and precise terms for feedback rating options

I am designing a user reputation system that will be an essential piece of an online marketplace for peer-to-peer item rentals. The user reputation system is based on the collection of feedbacks given ...
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2answers
74 views

Looking for a shorter term for “Preferred places to meet”

I am working on an online platform (mobile and web apps) that enable item lending/renting between peers. When a user posts an item for rent, he needs to put down his preferred places to meet for item ...
4
votes
2answers
151 views

Word for the situation of being unable to pass opposing pedestrian, as you both start to step same direction

Is there a word or expression in English, which describes the situation, when you can't pass a stranger, who is walking towards you on the street, because you both start to step the same direction? ...
3
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3answers
137 views

A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment where emotional and physical violence against women ...
-1
votes
1answer
355 views

“You look like your brother” or “Your brother looks like you”? [closed]

My friends are always saying stuff like, "You look like your brother ," or "Your brother looks like you." My brother is 4 years younger than me and I really can't see the resemblance; but it got me ...
0
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3answers
147 views

Word for someone who feels complete again, but not in the same way as they once were

I am writing a story about a girl who once was complete, but now has lost what made her feel whole. She has tried to replace it with the same thing but failed. Now she has replaced it with something ...
0
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0answers
61 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Less derogatory term for dump

I’m making a (multiple-)photo editing web-app, and there is a certain feature which allows users to sort of “hibernate” their accounts and log out, allowing them to pick up exactly where they left off ...
10
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10answers
1k views

An appropriate term for the 'contamination' of a language

Italians, for some reason, tend to accept and use foreign terms quite easily. The foreign terms that have entered and are entering common usage are mainly from the English language. Their usage has ...
6
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8answers
223 views

Expression for personality/lifestyle of somebody that likes to step outside of the comfort zone?

This is maybe a difficult question. In my mother tongue we have a word for it, but I can not find anything similar in english: How to describe a person/characteristic/way of life of somebody that ...
0
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5answers
164 views

“Knowledge of” vs. “Knowledgeable in”

How would I phrase this in a job description? Would I use "knowledge of" or "knowledgeable in"? Knowledge of navigating through large databases.
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4answers
1k views

What would you call that feeling of something crawling on the body

Morgellons is a controversial and poorly understood condition in which unusual thread-like fibers appear under the skin. The patient may feel like something is crawling, biting, or stinging ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

'Delays expected until November'; what ought they to say instead?

Where there are major roadworks on British roads you often see signs which say something like Delays expected until November. Everyone knows what it means i.e. that between now and November, if you ...
14
votes
12answers
3k views

Ways of saying “You don't have to be a rocket scientist” [closed]

I'm trying to find different ways of saying that "You don't have to be a rocket scientist", but I can't seem to get any good ideas. I got a variation, "You don't have to be a brain surgeon...," but ...
0
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2answers
68 views

“You should know” is it going beyond respect? [closed]

I'm going to start a informatic video series named "#YouShouldKnow" inspired from "Did You Know" but I think the name is getting little harsh and disrespectful, but I am confused Is this name Ok ...
0
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1answer
74 views

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant, how do I express that? [duplicate]

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant to the given question, how can I express it more clearly? I am not able to come up with an appropriate word to describe what I wish to describe, a few ...
4
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10answers
1k views

How to describe a person in a situation in which he does not completely know what he is doing?

How can we describe a person doing or communicating something without (really) knowing what he is doing or talking about? This could be either because of some indisposition like for example ...