Choosing the best phrase for a particular context or meaning.

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1answer
29 views

How to describe a confusion matrix correctly

In computer science, we a use a thing called confusion matrix for reporting results from supervised machine learning algorithms. It looks like this The image was taken from here. I would like to ...
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3answers
115 views

Word for a sudden flow of ideas? Is 'brainwave' good enough?

Imagine you are thinking about a problem you need to solve, nothing's coming to mind, and all of a sudden you get a dozen different ideas at once. Is there a word that expresses this sudden flow of ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Lost In Punctuation

Usually, when a piece of text is translated from one language to some other language, and (due to slightly different idioms, phrases, words, etc.) the end meaning is changed, then it is attributed to ...
1
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1answer
26 views

Idiom for dabbling in extremes

Is there a suitable idiomatic expression for a situation in which a person tends to dabble in extremes? For example, he might wake up at 4:00AM on some days and wake up at 11:00 AM on others and so ...
7
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12answers
812 views

Idiom/expression for changing the subject in a conversation

Is there an idiom/expression in English for changing the subject in a conversation (and if possible, in a sarcastic way)? For example, there is an expression in Turkish: gelelim fasulyenin ...
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2answers
55 views

Alternative to Without further ado?

It's a cliche talk in nearly all public speaking events, regardless of the type of the gathering (academic, business, wedding) and the level/class (top League school, fortune 500 company, 200 bucks ...
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1answer
33 views

Connotations of “hungry for X” and “thirsty for X.” [closed]

Does "hungry for X" have different connotations than "thirsty for X"? I did a few Google searches and found that "hungry for X" outdoes "thirsty for X" by about 250% with most values I tried for X. ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Is “myriad” not prevalent in “day to day speech”? [duplicate]

I have noticed people using "myriad" when they mean "uncountable" or simply many. Is "Myriad" not prevalent in "day to day speech Can it be used for definite but large amount of anything.
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2answers
20 views

connecting expressions with similar words

I often face this problem in scientific papers. When writing a title I have two possibilities. For example: Enterprise and Process Modelling or Enterprise Modelling and Process Modelling Water ...
1
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1answer
73 views

Which expression is correct? “in development” or “under development”?

When talking about a product or project that is still being developed (so it's in an unfinished state at the moment), which expression is the correct one? “in development” or “under development”? For ...
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2answers
54 views

Proper usage of “passed” vs “passed away”

The current popular verb for someone who has died is to say they "passed." It sounds incorrect to me -- isn't the proper terminology "passed-away"? I've noticed that people on TV and people under 30 ...
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2answers
40 views

Is it idiomatic to say “I never minded about…”?

For example: "I never minded about not getting paid for it". Does this sentence sound fine or should it be "I never cared about.."?
0
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1answer
26 views

Looking for concise and precise terms for feedback rating options

I am designing a user reputation system that will be an essential piece of an online marketplace for peer-to-peer item rentals. The user reputation system is based on the collection of feedbacks given ...
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2answers
62 views

Looking for a shorter term for “Preferred places to meet”

I am working on an online platform (mobile and web apps) that enable item lending/renting between peers. When a user posts an item for rent, he needs to put down his preferred places to meet for item ...
4
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2answers
136 views

Word for the situation of being unable to pass opposing pedestrian, as you both start to step same direction

Is there a word or expression in English, which describes the situation, when you can't pass a stranger, who is walking towards you on the street, because you both start to step the same direction? ...
3
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3answers
74 views

A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. My supervisor told me it is informal English, but I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment ...
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1answer
83 views

“You look like your brother” or “Your brother looks like you”? [closed]

My friends are always saying stuff like, "You look like your brother ," or "Your brother looks like you." My brother is 4 years younger than me and I really can't see the resemblance; but it got me ...
0
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3answers
108 views

Word for someone who feels complete again, but not in the same way as they once were

I am writing a story about a girl who once was complete, but now has lost what made her feel whole. She has tried to replace it with the same thing but failed. Now she has replaced it with something ...
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0answers
43 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
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5answers
2k views

Less derogatory term for dump

I’m making a (multiple-)photo editing web-app, and there is a certain feature which allows users to sort of “hibernate” their accounts and log out, allowing them to pick up exactly where they left off ...
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10answers
1k views

An appropriate term for the 'contamination' of a language

Italians, for some reason, tend to accept and use foreign terms quite easily. The foreign terms that have entered and are entering common usage are mainly from the English language. Their usage has ...
6
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8answers
156 views

Expression for personality/lifestyle of somebody that likes to step outside of the comfort zone?

This is maybe a difficult question. In my mother tongue we have a word for it, but I can not find anything similar in english: How to describe a person/characteristic/way of life of somebody that ...
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5answers
87 views

“Knowledge of” vs. “Knowledgeable in”

How would I phrase this in a job description? Would I use "knowledge of" or "knowledgeable in"? Knowledge of navigating through large databases.
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4answers
897 views

What would you call that feeling of something crawling on the body

Morgellons is a controversial and poorly understood condition in which unusual thread-like fibers appear under the skin. The patient may feel like something is crawling, biting, or stinging ...
2
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1answer
41 views

'Delays expected until November'; what ought they to say instead?

Where there are major roadworks on British roads you often see signs which say something like Delays expected until November. Everyone knows what it means i.e. that between now and November, if you ...
14
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12answers
3k views

Ways of saying “You don't have to be a rocket scientist” [closed]

I'm trying to find different ways of saying that "You don't have to be a rocket scientist", but I can't seem to get any good ideas. I got a variation, "You don't have to be a brain surgeon...," but ...
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2answers
57 views

“You should know” is it going beyond respect? [closed]

I'm going to start a informatic video series named "#YouShouldKnow" inspired from "Did You Know" but I think the name is getting little harsh and disrespectful, but I am confused Is this name Ok ...
0
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1answer
65 views

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant, how do I express that? [duplicate]

If I feel that an answer isn't relevant to the given question, how can I express it more clearly? I am not able to come up with an appropriate word to describe what I wish to describe, a few ...
4
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11answers
947 views

How to describe a person in a situation in which he does not completely know what he is doing?

How can we describe a person doing or communicating something without (really) knowing what he is doing or talking about? This could be either because of some indisposition like for example ...
0
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2answers
91 views

Butchering criticism?

Could "butcher" work as criticism? “I doubt [we'll be hearing from him], especially after we butchered him in that interview,”
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1answer
37 views

Arguably- does the adverb carries “what I am saying is unarguable” connotation [duplicate]

Arguably- “I’m a little confused about the usage of this word. "Roger Federer is arguably the best tennis player ever. This is what I heard in a conversation. My point is does the statement ...
2
votes
3answers
387 views

How to say “I met someone”, but not in the romantic way [closed]

I sometimes start stories with "I met someone who (...)" or "I met a man who (...)". Being a woman, people often seem to think there is something romantic about the meeting even though that was not ...
6
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5answers
895 views

What is an expression for a priest not wearing official attire?

Is there an English expression for a priest or monk not wearing his religious attire? (any Christian doctrine, or even more general). Clarification: I'm trying to say that someone looks like an ...
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0answers
66 views

Proper usage of 'Come to lunch' & 'Come for lunch'?

I told a colleague of mine that since she didn't 'come to lunch', hence no sweets for her. She corrected the sentence to 'come for lunch'. So which one is the proper usage ?
0
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1answer
83 views

Is “By one side, …, by the other side” a correct expression?

I've come across the formulation by one side, by other side instead of on the one hand/side and on the other hand/side. I strongly suspect this to be wrong and maybe Brazilian Portuguese originated, ...
9
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13answers
986 views

Historical or literary examples of misguided or botched attempts to help that end up causing harm [duplicate]

I'm looking for examples from history, folklore, literature, movies, or pop culture, of situations in which a person or group attempted to do something helpful but, due to their own poor judgment, ...
3
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2answers
200 views

Sorry I didn't turn up, I clean forgot. What's the sense of "clean' and its usage hygiene? [closed]

Sorry I didn't turn up -I clean forgot. The explosion blew the cooker clean through the wall. What kind of usage is this- AmE or BrE ? The meaning of clean usually refers to removing ...
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2answers
38 views

“Degree of Proximity” or “Proximity of Blood” or “Relation Proximity”?

I'm translating a civil record to English, which has a table of information about a family registry. One of the titles is "Degree of Proximity", however I'm not sure which of the expressions suits the ...
1
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4answers
381 views

A phrase for two characters that are unmistakably similar

I am looking for a phrase that compares two characters that share very similar attributes and characteristics. Prufrock and Hamlet truly are [ ... ] I don't want something like "very much ...
0
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3answers
52 views

Phrase for “putting one's plans into action”

I am looking for a phrase, metaphor, or cliche to mean "putting one's plans into action". I am using it in the following sentence. As the events of the play proceed, however, Hamlet becomes ...
0
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4answers
98 views

A proper substitute to “highly reactive” [closed]

I have to use the expression " highly reactive" a lot in my everyday writings. Can there be another word or phrase to put it better and which still connotes the correct meaning. Plutonium is a ...
10
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10answers
2k views

Is there a word for something loved by the masses but whose true value is lacking?

Is there a general word for someone or something popular or loved by the masses but that has not been proven to be effectual (like how some would use the term "pop psychology" pejoratively)? Examples ...
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4answers
96 views

Middle ground between “I'll live with it” and “Bring it on!”?

The context is a typical conversation. You've settled for a course of action and expressed yourself accordingly. Then you get from someone a warning of sorts about potential risks or consequences ...
1
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2answers
67 views

He stayed a week vs he stayed for a week

He stayed a week vs He stayed for a week I consider her my friend vs I consider her as my friend. I don't know whether he can be there vs I don't know if he can be there I often hear ...
6
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14answers
1k views

Opposite of “out of date”? [closed]

Can anyone think of a phrase we would use to describe a situation where something is the opposite of "out of date"; that is, it's "too new"? For example, a banana that's been sitting around for ages ...
1
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5answers
170 views

“Only the good die young.” Negative or Positive? [closed]

I've heard this expression before. I can't tell if its used as a positive one or a negative one? When is it appropriate to use this expression? Is it implying that people that live to be an old age ...
0
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0answers
43 views

Way to indicate coordinates

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? Upper left Y coordinate relative to the point z. Upper left Y coordinate to the point z. Thank you in advance.
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2answers
55 views

“Can't you see the person is embroidering?” - idiomaticity and alternatives?

Two persons, who were not privy to a scene, are now observing two others who are talking: [...] [one of the former, reacting to something that was just said] -Why did she/he say that!? ...
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4answers
343 views

What is the expression for “high fever”?

It can not be high/low according to my understanding. Fever is fever. He is suffering from fever of high temperature. He is suffering from high fever.
0
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3answers
87 views

Walk across/through/on the crosswalk?

What is the correct collocation here? Do you walk across the crosswalk, through the crosswalk, or on the crosswalk? Or can you say cross the crosswalk?