Etymology is the history of the origin of words and phrases.

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What's the origin of the word party pooper?

A party pooper is defined as: a person who refuses to join in the fun of a party; broadly : one who refuses to go along with everyone else I'm interested to know about the origin of this term and ...
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Why do the words ducky and jake mean fine or satisfactory?

Even the Merriam-Webster dictionary acknowledges both ducky and jake as acceptable terms meaning fine or satisfactory and it dates the word ducky back to 1897 and jake to 1914. Does anyone know how ...
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What's the meaning of “as your concern allows”

Keep in touch as your concerns allow. This sentence was preceded by the sentence "We seem to be out of sync in reading each other's mind."
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comfiture and discomfiture - etymology

discomfiture anxious embarrassment comfiture a candy containing a nut or piece of fruit. Are these two "false friends", words seeming to be related but of completely different ...
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Where did the phrase You “have a really punchable face” originate?

MS Paint Adventures references this phrase on this page in homestuck: http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=002224 I also distinctly remember hearing the same phrase in one of the three first ...
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What is the origin of the place name Privett vs. plant name Privet?

The Ligustrum vulgare, the English Privet, seems to have a confused history. It was known to the ancient Greeks as an important plant in making their formal gardens or topia "places" which gives us ...
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Origin of “Knocked” in “Have (Got) It Knocked”

I read the 11 Nov. 1978 panel of Garfield, in which the phrase "have got it knocked" is used. Transcript: Panel 1 [Garfield is in bed but mobile] Garfield: Oh-oh. I feel a nap attack ...
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Etymology of the word 'ax'

Does the word 'ax' originate from Anglo-Saxon [eax, aex] or from Greek [axo, ax, from axon, axis- A combining form]. From the source I researched scholars have linked these separate languages at this ...