Etymology is the history of the origin of words and phrases.

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Etymology of 'security' in finance [closed]

[OED:] 5. e. Chiefly in pl. Originally: a document held by a creditor as a guarantee of the right to payment, or attesting ownership of property, stock, bonds, etc.; [5.2] (hence) the ...
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Spelling etymology of “-il[l]” words

I've noticed that modern English seems to have a very strong bias to spell verbs which end with "-(consonant)-il" with double "l", i.e. "-ill". The overwhelming majority of such verbs (like to will, ...
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Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
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Yikes! Where did it come from?

(humorous, slang) Expressing fear. (humorous, slang) Expressing empathy with unpleasant or undesirable circumstances. [Wiktionary] Yikes! Where did it come from? OED says "Origin ...
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Did “pertinacious” and “pertinent” come from the same origin?

From dictionary.com: pertinacious meaning: holding tenaciously to a purpose, course of action, or opinion; resolute. stubborn or obstinate. extremely or objectionably persistent. while ...
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Why is “meta” pronounced differently to “beta”? [closed]

Is there an etymological explanation to this? Why is "meta" pronounced ˈmɛtə while "beta" is pronounced ˈbeɪtə or ˈbiːtə? (Pronunciations taken from Cambridge Dictionaries Online)
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Why is Peruvian Brown so named?

There is a colour named "Peruvian Brown". This is mentioned in the Wikipedia entry for shades of brown. The Wikipedia entry gives a reference to an offline book, and examples of modern use (the x11 ...
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Why do the names of so many places end in -ia?

Many countries, continents, states, and cities have an English name ending in ‘-ia’: India, Indonesia, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Asia, Alexandria, Philadelphia, California, … What ...
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Origins of “from the outside” (to mean from the beginning)

I came across a sentence that went something like this: I wish I'd known about this from the outside - I would have done a better job. I've heard "from the outside" used like this before a ...
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Skeat's abbreviation “Cot.” [closed]

In his Concise Dictionary of English Etymology, W W Skeat often uses the abbreviation "Cot.", but I cannot find this mentioned in his lists of abbreviations and symbols.
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Use of 'cum' as the interstitial in a three-word semi-comparative adjective? [duplicate]

I have occasionally encountered and often written a three-word adjective of the form 'X-cum-Y' to describe a person, where the X and Y are normally set somewhat in tension with one another, if they ...
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What is the etymology of the Baseball term “meat hand”?

The term is used to signify the non gloved hand of the pitcher. I've only ever heard it used relative to the pitcher. For example, “On the bunt the pitcher used his meat hand instead of gloving the ...
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Using the term “love” instead of zero in tennis; other countries say zero, not love [duplicate]

The Americans and other English speaking countries seem to be the only ones that use the term "love" for zero in scoring tennis.
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Etymology of “amoral”

Many internet sites (like this one) say that the word amoral was coined by Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) as a differentiation from immoral. These sites also say that amoral comes from the Greek ...
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Etymology of the term “salty” when used as slang [closed]

I often watch Hearthstone streams on Twitch, and many streamers will use the term "salty" to describe their emotions they feel when something unlucky happens to them. It seems to be synonymous with ...
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Why are these spellings pronounced “non phonetically?”

In Anglo English, the word ewe (female sheep) is pronounced "you," rather than, say, "e-weh." Likewise, the surname Ewell, is pronounced "yule," rather than "e-well." Why is that?
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When did 'the D' for penis come into common use?

I had never heard of this until last year, but suddenly everyone on the internet is using it. I was wondering where it came from and why it took off so quickly. eg. She wants the D.
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Please kill me or just shoot me now

Please kill me and (just) shoot me now are two common idiomatic colloquial expressions which are generally used to mean that you, metaphorically, would rather die than do something or to express the ...
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Etymology of the word 'galligu'?

I came across a word in an chemistry lecture which appears in plenty of places but none explaining where the word came from. The word in question is 'galligu' From wiktionary, Galligu 1. The ...
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Turn the world upside down

What does this expression really mean and where did it come from? I'm assuming that it means you are just hanging upside down. Maybe it means that your head is always hanging low and you are sad, ...
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Why “exhume” but not “exter”?

As far as I can find, there's this set of words for burying things and digging them up: inhume and inter, both meaning put into earth disinter (and apparently disinhume) meaning unput into earth ...
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Origin of “blew his brains out” [closed]

I was thinking to myself, when suddenly a thought occurred to me: When was the first usage of "blew his brains out"? Example as used in sentence: He put the shotgun in his mouth with one shell in ...
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Origins and meaning of, “Ham and Egg it”?

This term was used by a MLB sports announcer yesterday (5/10/2015 - Padres vs. Diamondbacks @ 2:10:41) talking about relying on relief pitchers. “Diamondbacks today trying to ham and egg it with ...
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Who came up with “nothing propinks like propinquity”?

The Online Etymology Dictionary entry for the verb to approach references propinquity (NED, psychology, AHD, wiktionary) which contains a reference to an aphorism: late 14c., "nearness in ...
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From the “Baghdad bounce” to the “dead-cat bounce”

The world of finance has always been creative in using metaphors to describe financial phenomena. Specifically I am referring to a situation where financial market suffers a consistent fall and ...
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How did “meta” come to mean self-referential?

Meta is a very commonly-used term meaning self-referential. Oxford defines it as: (Of a creative work) referring to itself or to the conventions of its genre; self-referential: the ...
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Sinister: Left slides to malicious, but how? [duplicate]

How did "sinister" migrate from the Latin for "left" to English for "evil"?
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Origin of “sapiosexual”

The word sapiosexual describes one who is attracted to intelligence. And while it's formed from Latin roots (sapiens + sexual), it appears to be a very new word. Google Ngram has no record of the ...
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Why is B.C. (Before Christ) in English, but A.D. (anno domini) in Latin?

There are some posts explaining the shift from BC/AD to BCE/CE, but my question is with the BC/AD terms: why is the former, older, time period in English while the latter, later period is in Latin?
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What does “Schmissues” mean in “Issues, schmissues. Can the Presidential candidates sing”? [duplicate]

Today’s (May 7) New York Times carries an article under the title, “Issues, schmissues. Can the Presidential candidates sing?,” which begins with the following passage: “The cacophony of presidential ...
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“Go Green !” : Grammatical Analysis

I have been trying to see what is behind the hyped-up phrase "Go Green" and have asked friends to rephrase that buzz-word/cliche, but nobody has given me a satisfactory explanation of what it actually ...
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How did 'up to' evolve to mean 'regardless of', in maths?

Even the OED seems not to have featured it. I couldn't find an explanation on Etymonline. [Wikipedia:] If X is some property or process, the phrase "up to X" means "disregarding a possible ...
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Base/root of increment and decrement

I'm tasked with a morphological analysis of incrementing. I would say that crement is the base of increment and the root of the word. But I'm curious, because all my life I've been thinking about ...
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What did the prefix “anti” mean in the 1800s?

I'm reading a book written in the 1800s where a people called themselves Anti-Lehi-Nephi. This people called themselves this to be different then their allies the "Nephites". Did "anti" mean the same ...
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Why is “coon” a word?

The word formation process that yielded the word coon is called (fore-)clipping: raccoon > coon Other examples of fore-clipping include: bot (robot), chute (parachute), roach (cockroach), coon ...
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Did the English call a fruit “openærs” for 700 years?

There is a small apple-tasting fruit called medlar in English. It looks like a cross between an apple and a rosehip. It has two main curious features: first the fruit must be bletted before it can ...
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How did 'unless' evolve to mean 'if not'?

[Etymonline:] mid-15c., earlier onlesse, from on lesse (than) "on a less condition (than); see less. The first syllable originally on, but the negative connotation and the lack of stress changed it ...
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Origin of “article” as a grammatical term

In English grammar, why is it that articles are named so? I associate the word with newspaper articles. Where did the term come from?
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When did “Alright?” become a greeting in UK English?

Who remembers when and how "Alright?" became a greeting in UK English? Do you remember the first time you heard it? Can you remember when that was? What was the context? Was there a particular ...
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Did ‘alakazam’ magically appear out of the thin air?

I doubt it. But when did alakazam enter English, where did it come from, and who first used it? I vaguely recall the TV magic show The Magic Land of Allakazam (1960–1964) from my Texas childhood, and ...
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Morphology of mobster, gangster, webster, hipster

Where the letter "t" came from in these words? Is it part of the suffix -ter- or a separate suffix? Where the "s" comes from? Can other words on -ster be formed this way?
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“Intelligence” (in the espionage sense) - first use?

Does anyone have an idea of when the word "intelligence" was first used, in the context of espionage? Was it used in this context in (for instance) the 18th century?
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How did 'sequester' evolve from 'follow' to 'remove'?

[ Etymonline for 'sequester (v.)' ] late 14c., "remove" something, "quarantine, isolate" (someone); "excommunicate;" also intransitive, "separate oneself from," from Old French sequestrer (14c.), ...
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How did 'deign' upend its meaning from 'worthy' to 'condescend'?

I was researching the etymology of disdain which rechannels to the following: [ Etymonline for 'deign (v.)' ] c. 1300, from Old French deignier (Modern French daigner), from Latin dignari "to deem ...
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How did we get ‘deft’ and ‘daffy’ from “daft”?

[ Etymonline for 'daft (adj.)'] Old English gedæfte "gentle, becoming," ... from PIE * dhabh- "to fit together" (see fabric). Sense of "mild, well-mannered" (c. 1200). [ Etymonline for ...
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Etymology behind “tim-” words involving honor and “tim-” words involving fear?

Words like timocracy (a form of government based on ambition for honor) and Timothy (honor to God) come from time, which means "honor" or "worth." According to Etymonline, timid (easily frightened) ...
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Why does attach have two Ts and detach have only one?

The title says it all. We have two words: Attach Detach Shouldn't they be...? Attach Dettach Or? Atach Detach
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Fraught, as in Overwrought Anxiety?

How did "fraught" come to include the second definition? What is the connection? FRAUGHT adjective: 1. (of a situation or course of action) filled with or destined to result in (something ...
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What is the origin of the phrase “got the hump”? [closed]

depressed, in a bad mood but I am wondering did it come from camels?
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The Road Warrior

In modern business speak one increasingly sees the phrase "Road Warrior" used to refer to people who spend a lot of their time travelling for work. Looking at it independentaly this seems a bit of an ...