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0
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1answer
22 views

Scientific Nomenclature: italics or roman in an italic environment

Scientific Nomenclature says that: Italics are used for bacterial and viral taxa at the level of family and below. All bacterial and many viral genes are italicized. Serovars of Salmonella ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Can I use “have many things to do with”?

Can I use "have many things to do with" to emphasize something has important relationships with others? For example, this graph has many things to do with the characteristic of the equation.
43
votes
6answers
219k views

“Whether or not” vs. “whether”

This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job. This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job or not. This will depend on whether or not he's suitable for the job. ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

What is the purpose of emphasizing indefine article 'a'? [duplicate]

I often see and hear native speakers emphasizing word a, using intonation and /ei/ pronunciation. I understand what they say and I am able to properly (I guess) use it in my speech. But I wonder why ...
9
votes
2answers
4k views

Whence “emphasis mine”?

Writers often highlight part of a quotation to emphasize the point they're making. They use a variety of phrases to indicate that the emphasis did not appear in the original text. In order of current ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

successfully delivered vs delivered successfully? [duplicate]

I have sent a test email again and the email got successfully delivered. I have sent a test email again and the email got delivered successfully. In the above sentence which one is correct and how? ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Bold, Italics or Underline? [duplicate]

When writing a letter, or other form of written work, what is the appropriate way to put emphasis on a word or phrase? When would one use bold? When would one use italics? When would one use an ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Is one allowed to use capitalization for emphasis? [closed]

In written English, is it okay to emphasize words by capitalizing them? As in: I would NEVER do that! Are there other methods to achieve this? On an aside: Dutch uses acute accents for ...
2
votes
1answer
645 views

“What have we here?” vs. “What do we have here?” [closed]

Could someone explain which structure is correct and if it's okay to say the other one? Oh, what have we here? Oh, what do we have here? Can we simply invert the subject and the verb to ...
0
votes
2answers
136 views

The meaning of word “do” in “Yes, I do watch TV” [duplicate]

Suppose Alice asks Tom “Do you watch TV?” Tom answers, “Yes, I watch TV” But Tom can also answer as follows “Yes, I do watch TV.” What is the difference between the two answers and the ...
3
votes
2answers
736 views

Actually work vs Actually does work?

Is there any differences between following two sentences. I have seen both in various places and I can't really find a difference between them. It actually works. It actually does work. ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“I know“ or “I do know”

I have seen people using I do know that instead of I know that Is this usage correct?
2
votes
3answers
61 views

How should you punctuate the construction of “She read until she reached the word x.”?

What is the correct way to highlight a specific word in the following way? She read until she came to the word packet. I feel like it's either one of the following ways, but I'm unsure. She read ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is it acceptable to start an emphatic sentence with “It is he who…”?

It is he who the students choose as the repersentative of their class. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, why? I would like to know whether the pronoun `he´ can be used in this ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

For words that can be a noun or not a noun, why does the noun have the emphasis at the start?

There are some pairs of words that can act as a noun or not a noun (a verb or an adjective. For instance: rebel present compact Why is it that the noun version of these words have their emphasis ...
19
votes
12answers
4k views

What's the term for not just being wrong, but the exact opposite of right?

I'd like to concisely (ideally, in one word) express my opinion that the styling on the Removed permissions and Added permissions text in the picture below is not just wrong, but the exact opposite of ...
0
votes
2answers
409 views

Is “It is these two issues that we need to pay attention to.” a correct sentence?

I hear many native speakers do say sentences that do not strictly follow the subject-verb agreement grammar rules. (This is off-topic, but do they do it without realizing it?) But in writing, this ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

What does “do” mean in “They really do exist”? [duplicate]

I was watching an animation last night then I heard a sentence which was strange for me. One of the characters sayed this sentence "They really do exist" He sayed it because he saw a creature ...
0
votes
3answers
82 views

Is there a general rule that dictates how the connotation of a sentence changes depending on the ordering of its words or clauses?

For instance: "This morning I ate breakfast quickly because the train was late." "I ate breakfast quickly this morning because the train was late." "Because the train was late I ate breakfast ...
2
votes
1answer
911 views

8-in-1 sentence - depending on emphasis

I have learned that this sentence has different meanings depending on which word is emphasized: She said she did not take his money. It was not someone else who said it. She said she did not take ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

“the wedding” versus “a wedding”

If I want to talk to my coworkers about my wedding do I say "I had a wedding last month" or do i say "I had the wedding last month"? Since it is the only wedding I shall ever have, and it is the very ...
7
votes
1answer
130 views

Why is “their” italicized? [closed]

I'm having trouble understanding this sentence by Noam Chomsky. Noam published many English-related scientific papers in his professional career and I have no doubt that this italicization is ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

Using 'so' for emphasis

A quick question. Is it possible to use 'so' for emphasis in the following sentence: Indeed, the religious ethos so permeates the book If so, should the following clause be a that-clause? '..so ...
3
votes
2answers
61 views

Contrasting emphasis of an uncountable noun

In this translated sentence, water is supposed to be emphasized in contradistinction to the sand in an hourglass/sand clock: Like an hourglass, the device is made of glass and metal, except that ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Pronunciation of a (article) /ə/ vs /eɪ/ [duplicate]

When to use the weak form /ə/ and when to use the weak form /eɪ/ of the article "a"? I figure if I would emphasize anything I wouldn't emphasize an article like "a", but rather, the noun (phrase) ...
4
votes
1answer
76 views

Emphasizing part of a word

Couldn't find much on this particular stylistic method, but I was wondering: how would one emphasize only part of a word in an informal novel-like case? "It wasn't new in any way—just newer." ...
2
votes
1answer
311 views

How common it is to emphasize a sentence by adding periods between words?

I am thinking about this style of writing: We. Do. Not. Negotiate! First of all, how would you call that? I have difficulties finding references about it, even though it seems to me that this is ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Does the word “buttress,” which is both a noun & verb, follow the rules about where to put emphasis based on its part of speech? [closed]

buttress (n.) any prop or support buttress (v.) to support by a buttress; prop up Words like combat, abstract, project, and convict change the syllable that's stressed based on whether ...
0
votes
1answer
814 views

The use of “actually” and “whatsoever”

The word, actually means to "emphasize a fact or a comment, or that something is really true." So why is whatsoever used in this sentence You have no right whatsoever to read what is written ...
7
votes
13answers
1k views

Is there a common expression for “origin of everything”? What could it be?

In some languages there is a common pathetic hyperbole that goes like "the origin of origins" or "beginning of beginnings". Is there anything similar in English [or Latin]? Context: consider a ...
2
votes
2answers
340 views

How to explain the use of stress to emphasize agreement

In a discussion with someone whose first language is not English, the phrase "that is fun" came up, with the stress applied to emphasize agreement. This was taken as an insult; he thought the stress ...
3
votes
1answer
321 views

How do different languages convey shades of meaning as English does with stress?

Browsing this site recently, I noticed a lot of discussion, not to say bickering, about whether some languages are more expressive or nuanced than others. It reminded me of a question I had in my ...
0
votes
2answers
275 views

what's the difference between “I know.” and “ I know that.”? [closed]

example dialog: "yes, yes, it's your job. I know that." Can I just say "I know" instead of "I know that"? another one: do I say It is very pretty. Where did you buy? -or- where did ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

Express Emphasis without using Italics or Underline

Are there any methods to express emphasis without using italics or underline? I find that there are many cases where formatting does not allow italics, even if emphasis would add to the text greatly. ...
-1
votes
2answers
152 views

Saying a word in a way that describes its meaning

Is there an English term that is used when one says a word in a way that somewhat describes what it means? For example "Peter was really ANGRY at you Damien!"... Here, large emphasis would be placed ...
1
vote
1answer
442 views

Context for “He never DID like her” and “He always DID like her”

I am trying to understand the usage of focused do/does/did that are preceded by adverbs such as never, always, still, etc. Are the following conversions idiomatic? A: John liked Mary before. B: No! ...
0
votes
2answers
193 views

Is it a big mistake if I say “The thing I love are flowers”? [duplicate]

So I was wondering if both forms are correct The thing I love is flowers and The thing I love are flowers
19
votes
7answers
3k views

Why is “did” italicized for emphasis in “Where did you come from?”

Where did you come from? What is the nuance of this emphasis? I could understand it if the emphasis were on where.
3
votes
2answers
562 views

Can I use the adjective as the first word?

Is it okay if I rearrange the sentence The apple on the table was green or The green apple was on the table to put the adjective in front, as the first word, like Green, was the apple on ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Can “be” be used with the modal verb “do”?

These two sentences are both valid I write this sentence. I do write this sentence. Are these both valid? I am writing this sentence. I do be writing this sentence.
3
votes
1answer
279 views

Cleft sentences

Let's assume that John gave me a cat. I can rephrase the fact with: What John did was to give me a cat What John did was give me a cat What John did was, he gave me a cat But can I say the ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

“former” vs “last” as in “my former, only and last husband”

I was reading a book and found this expression: [...] my former, only and last husband. Could anyone tell me what are the differences between former and last in this case? Also, would former and ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Words like “do/does/did” to emphasize, but for “am/is/are”

So X said to Y: I did tell you yesterday! As far as I know, the word did there is to emphasize my point or tell him that I'm so sure I've told him the story yesterday. What I want to ask is, ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “learning yourself” the same as “learning by yourself”?

(Other than the first also meaning to learn about oneself...) Is learning yourself the same as learning by yourself? How much do these two phrases differ? In India's spoken English, the former is ...
0
votes
1answer
245 views

Proper usage of “themselves”?

Could anyone please tell me if I used "themselves" properly in this sentences: Such artificial samples can also potentially reduce distortions ... that are due to varying properties of the samples ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

How to call attention to “I” without “I myself” or the pretentious “even I”?

I find that in persuasive conversation, whether written or oral, it is sometimes useful to draw attention to the "I" in the sentence, giving the connotation that you are confessing or conceding to ...
0
votes
1answer
294 views

Does emphasis ever change the fundamental pronunciation of a word?

A friend of mine has a theory that changing the emphasis from one syllable of a word to another never really affects the "core" pronunciation. So for instance, consider the word umbrella. The ...
4
votes
3answers
151 views

Punctuation of a dependent clause for strong emphasis

Which of the sentences below is correct if I want to strongly emphasize that the pencil is not is not white? This is a black instead of a white pencil. This is a black, instead of a white, ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“Development of technology” vs. “technology development”

I was wondering which form is the correct one, "technology development" or "the development of technology". For example: The pace of technology development affected me in several ways. The ...
41
votes
11answers
9k views

Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it ...