An ellipsis is an omission of words from a clause, or the punctuation mark "..."

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“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
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93 views

“The delegation will depart and will be accompanied” vs. “will depart and be accompanied”

(a) The delegation will depart from the embassy at 9 A.M. and will be accompanied to the airport by the Minister of Sports. (b) The delegation will depart from the embassy at 9 A.M. and be ...
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125 views

“tabloid” or “tabloid newpsaper”?

Is it considered informal to refer to tabloid and broadsheet newspapers as a "tabloid" and "broadsheet", as opposed to "tabloid newspaper" and "broadsheet newspaper"? I'm writing a piece in the style ...
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35 views

“X and me/I having dinner” in captions/headlines/sentence fragments

This is different from some other questions since this is about the usage of "X and me/I" in captions/headlines when it is followed by a gerund (verb+(-ing)) instead of in regular sentences. This ...
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Only one word omitted from quote

If there is only one word omitted from a direct quote, does it still get the ellipsis? The original quote was: "He said I still had to go to school." The person read it as "He said I had to go to ...