An eggcorn is an idiosyncratic substitution of a word or phrase for a word or words that sound similar or identical. The new phrase introduces a meaning that is different from the original, but plausible in the same context.

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3
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2answers
123 views

What is this kind of spelling mistake called? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence from this web page (a review of an episode from the TV show "How I Met Your Mother"). "The focus on Robin really aloud her character to get the kind of attention she ...
1
vote
2answers
227 views

“we do not want to overstate our welcome”

"we do not want to overstate our welcome" meaning "we DO VERY MUCH welcome you!" OR “we'd better keep our message of welcome at a moderate level”? as in this context each season, more ...
2
votes
0answers
306 views

“Season's greetings” or “Seasoned greetings” [closed]

Today I heard the phrase "Seasoned greetings." Is this just some clever word play on the traditional "Season's greetings," meant to mean greetings spiced up with seasoning, or is it a legitimate ...
7
votes
2answers
14k views

Shoo-in vs Shoe-in and etymology

I noticed a USA Today article today that said "Mary Barra has been a growing force within General Motors. While she wasn't necessarily a shoe-in to be named to the CEO job...". I was pretty sure ...
-2
votes
2answers
931 views

“On sight” or “on site”? [closed]

"You should kill trolls on sight" "You should kill trolls on site" Which is correct? I'm not a native speaker, so I don't really have much intuition for these idioms, but semantically both seem to ...
3
votes
1answer
701 views

“Ridden” and “Riddled”

I am familiar with the "-ridden" construction, e.g. "anxiety-ridden". I also know that "riddled with X" is possible. I recently saw the combination "ridden with X", which sounds off to me, but I'm not ...
5
votes
3answers
862 views

Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone

What would you call the following: Speak now or forever hold your piece.
15
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1answer
1k views

“Soft-peddle” vs. “Soft-pedal”: eggcorn blunder or sly play on words?

In chat the other day I asked the following question: "Recently I've been seeing writers using "soft-peddle" in print (in reputable publications, to boot) when I am certain the trope is ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

“Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”

I've heard both phrases in everyday speech, so there's little doubt in my mind that the answer is both. I suspect, though, that one of these phrases is more the original than the other, and the other ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “make due” now considered acceptable?

Whilst plodding through Patrick Rothfuss' "The Name of the Wind", I came across: Our dinner was nowhere near as grand as last night's. We made due with the last of my now-stale flatbread, dried ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

Origin of “lacksadaisical” (misspelled and mispronounced for “lackadaisical”)

I was astonished to learn that the word lacksadaisical or laxadaisical is both misspelled and mispronounced. It is still commonly used in Southern Africa (with the same meaning), whereas it is rare to ...
0
votes
1answer
469 views

“Piece of mind”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in an article titled “Personal Health: Diagnosing PMS” in The New York Times, Women's Health, (August 28, 1996). Experts insist that no ...
13
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5answers
16k views

Is it “a tough row to hoe?”, or “a tough road to hold?”

Is it an old farming metaphor, or a military saying? Where did this(these) saying(s) originate?
4
votes
1answer
191 views

Is “banned from the airways” an eggcorn or malapropism?

It should be "banned from the airwaves", meaning "not allowed to be played on radio". I noticed this mistake in a British newspaper story. The former star's music has largely been banned from the ...
6
votes
4answers
359 views

Is “heinz sight” an eggcorn of “hindsight”?

I've spotted a new eggcorn in the wild, that isn't mentioned in the eggcorn database. At least, it certainly has some of the elements of an eggcorn but is it a proper one? I'll let you decide. ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “home goal” an eggcorn of “own goal”?

I used to think when a player put the ball in his own net it was called a home goal because that's what the older kids in school called it. Then at some point I noticed that TV commentators were ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

“Sick and tied” and “sick and tired”

What is the difference between phrases "sick and tied" and "sick and tired"? Is the first phrase correct? Possibilities (summary from comments): The standard phrase is definitely “sick and tired” ...
6
votes
5answers
13k views

Is it “just as soon” or “just assume”?

If someone says a phrase that sounds like "I'd just as soon you don't get in an accident, so I'll call you later", are they actually saying "just as soon" or "just assume" or something else?
6
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1answer
3k views

Meaning of “I'll make due”

When someone says "I'll make due" what does it mean?
3
votes
1answer
25k views

“One another” or “one and other”

I thought this might have already been asked, but apparently not. Is using the phrase "one another" considered equivalent to the phrase "one and other"? Is one of the two considered right and the ...
7
votes
3answers
33k views

“Intents and purposes” versus “intensive purposes”

I know that "for all intents and purposes" is the correct saying, but I often hear/see people say/write "for all intensive purposes". I was under the impression that the latter is completely ...
30
votes
4answers
108k views

Is “yay or nay” an acceptable alternative to “yea or nay”?

Is "yay or nay" an acceptable alternative to "yea or nay"? I have seen it several times in recent weeks, enough to make me wonder whether it is an emerging usage or just a common typo.