1
vote
3answers
250 views

“I like it that” vs. “I like that”

I want to express the following: You are blaming me for your lack of concern and I like that (in a sarcastic way). Which one of the following sentences would be correct? I like it that your ...
0
votes
4answers
125 views

“Makes them difficult to simulate” vs “makes it difficult to simulate them”

Which statement is correct? The complexity of these systems makes them difficult to simulate on computers. The complexity of these systems makes it difficult to simulate them on computers. ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Grammaticality of “Is it today that…”

I would like to know if it is grammatically correct to ask the question, "Is it today that you are going to town?" My concern is specifically the "Is it" part.
4
votes
2answers
3k views

When is (it) a good time to call you?

When is it a good time to call you? When is a good time to call you? Everybody tells me that both are correct. What is the exact grammatical difference?
3
votes
2answers
118 views

“Make easy” vs. “make it easy” [closed]

I need to know which of these options is the correct one and why: The Spanish cooking makes it easy to have a nice meal. The Spanish cooking makes easy to have a nice meal. I don't know ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“As is customary” vs. “as it is customary”

I more often see the first version being used, but to me, that doesn't sound right because I can't see the subject there. I would definitely use the second one. What am I missing here? Update: ...
1
vote
2answers
21k views

“What day is it today?” vs. “What day is today?”

Which of the following is grammatical? What date/day is it today? What date/day is today?
25
votes
7answers
2k views

Why “it’s turtles” not “they are turtles”

It is a third person singular and is used to refer to a thing. If that’s the case, then why do we say: A well-known scientist (some say it was Bertrand Russell) once gave a public lecture on ...
1
vote
2answers
936 views

Is “it makes it easy to do …” good English?

There are two "it"s in this sentence, but they refer to different things. Is this considered good English? If not, what's a better way to express the same meaning?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

“A guy whose job is to” vs “a guy whose job it is to”?

I've been hearing the phrase "whose job it is to" quite often lately. Consider these two sentences: We have a guy whose job is to clean windows. We have a guy whose job it is to clean ...