The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Asking a “Do you have…” question without do-support

Is the following sentence correct English? Have you the address? The address in question is obvious to the person being asked. It's normal to ask such a question as "Do you have the address?" ...
1
vote
2answers
319 views

Is “He don't mean it” correct? [duplicate]

When I was reading the book Because of Winn-Dixie, on page 89 I found a paragraph as follows: "Oh, lay off her," Dunlap said to Stevie. Then he turned to me. "He don't mean it," he said. Can ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

Difference between two question formats?

I have seen people using following two formats to form a question: 1) Why do people lie? 2) Why people lie? The difference is, in the first one, there is an explicit use of do whereas the ...
0
votes
3answers
109 views

Words like “do/does/did” to emphasize, but for “am/is/are”

So X said to Y: I did tell you yesterday! As far as I know, the word did there is to emphasize my point or tell him that I'm so sure I've told him the story yesterday. What I want to ask is, ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What are usages similar to “Need I say more?”?

I recall hearing usages like Need I say more? Need I remind you that ...? instead of Do I need to say more? Do I need to remind you that ...? Indeed, they sound better, at least to ...
4
votes
1answer
456 views

Comparing negatives: “she seems not to know” vs. “she doesn't seem to know”

What is the difference in style and meaning between the following two: She seems not to know. She doesn't seem to know. Is there a name to this type of construction?
0
votes
2answers
56 views

To use ‘to’ or not is the question ;) [duplicate]

I believe the grammatically correct way is to omit the to before the verb (find in this case). Can someone confirm? What you have to do instead is find a way to redefine the problem ... I ask ...
3
votes
2answers
373 views

Why does the verb 'have' require 'do' or 'got' and cannot be used alone?

When I began to study English, about 50 years ago, I was taught to ask, for instance, 'Have you a car?' and, if the answer was negative, to answer 'I have not a car.' However, when I came back to ...
2
votes
1answer
355 views

Asking a question with “have” without do-support: “What symptoms has Anne?”

The context is that a doctor is asking about somebody's child's symptoms of influenza. Is this question correct: "What symptoms has Anne?" If it's incorrect, then why? It looks strange to me, I ...
-2
votes
3answers
368 views

“What keeps him going?” vs. “What does him keep going?” [duplicate]

Why is the grammatical structure of "What keeps him going?" right? I got a bit confused over this, when I realized that this structure fundamentally contradicts the basic rule I teach my students: ...
0
votes
1answer
413 views

“than do I” vs. “than I do” [duplicate]

I need grammatical explanations for the following two sentence structures: The mistakes children make in learning to speak tell linguists more about how children learn language than do the ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“Which browsers do support this?” or “Which browsers support this?” [duplicate]

What is the correct syntax: "Which browsers do support this?" "Which browsers support this?"
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Verb + not = do not verb ? What is the gramatical explanation?

I have long been puzzled by the usage of 'verb + not'. For example, Kennedy said, "... my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." The Bible ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Is the expression “It don't” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don’t impress me much” It doesn't. Usually, we say it this way, right? But I have seen some song lyrics using "it don't". (Examples ...
0
votes
2answers
310 views

Can inversion be used without auxiliary verb?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I don't like autumn to be honest, neither like I winter that's coming after it. Can inversion be used in this way? Or does it requires auxiliary ...
-3
votes
3answers
287 views

“Why you no…?” or “What that no…?” — are those grammatically correct? [closed]

Why you no come? Why you no talk English? Why you no have a girlfriend? What kind of English are these sentences? Are these types of sentences grammatically correct?
6
votes
3answers
677 views

How widely-accepted is “What do you got?” to Americans?

Watching A Stranger Among Us, I noticed that Melanie Griffith twice asked "What do you got?" I recognise this as an American construction which sounds strange to me — Brits invariably say either ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Interrogative sentences without auxiliary verbs and declarative sentences with auxiliary verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Sometimes, auxiliary verbs or helping verbs are not present in some interrogative sentences in some specific contexts ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“Never saw” versus “didn't ever see”

Do these sentences have different meanings? I never saw such a thing. I didn't ever see such a thing. I never saw him dancing. I didn't ever see him dancing. My ...
10
votes
1answer
167 views

“A child don't know anything” in Gadsby — grammatically right? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” In Gadsby, which is almost grammatically not wrong at all, occurs just a solitary construction that I ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“Allows not” vs. “does not allow”

Which should I use: allows not or does not allow? Can I use both? Are there verbs that does not allow the two forms?
1
vote
0answers
148 views

“She don't care about me”: how to explain this? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” I know the rule, the correct form is: "she doesn't care about me," but I heard it in Lost series, I ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Question about interrogations in past tense

In regard to this answer, my question is similar but that answer is not clear. I want to know why we use base form of verb, e.g. 'go' to form the past tense instead of past form such as 'went'? ...
0
votes
1answer
534 views

Do vs. does in a statement [closed]

In the statement "Editorial use of images do not require a model release." which form of do/does would be correct? Should the verb agree with images (as in "images do not require..."), or with ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Unusual usage of “do” in “do you follow your path”, in a sentence that is not a question

I don't understand the structure of this sentence: “Well, well, Inspector,” said he. “Do you follow your path and I will follow mine. It is from The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge, part 2, a ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is “do” sometimes put before a verb? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “do” in affirmative statements Why do people sometimes use the words "do" or "does" in affirmative sentences? For example: A: We know a guy! ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

“How does he does/do that?” [closed]

How does he does that? How does he do that? Which one is correct? This type of sentence sounds a little odd because of two do/does in a single statement. Is there an alternative which has ...
0
votes
0answers
395 views

“She’s got a ticket to ride, but she don’t care” — why? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much” In the famous Beatles song Ticket to ride, it is said of the protagonist that “she don’t care”. Why ...
13
votes
3answers
9k views

Why do we use 'did' with questions using the simple past tense?

Where did you go last night? Where went you last night? Is there a reason we say the first of the previous two sentences as opposed to the last one? I know the second sentence is ...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Is it better to say “How do I…” or “How can I…”?

Is it better to say "How do I do something?" or "How can I do something?"
2
votes
2answers
6k views

'Did see' and 'Saw'

The blog post here uses the title “Isn’t this just the cutest thing you ever did see?” I am sure this is correct, but my question is, but what difference it would have made had he used the ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“Who wrote … ?” or “Who did write … ?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?” I want to know which is the correct way to ask this question: Who wrote ...
4
votes
3answers
660 views

Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?”

I'm wondering whether expressions like the ones below are correct or not. I've seen them several times but they don't seem to follow the typical grammatical structure. Who comes? (instead of ...
4
votes
5answers
7k views

Why do courts use “What say you?”

... instead of "What do you say?" I am not sure if "What say you?" is even grammatically correct.
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do we invert word order when asking a question?

What's the difference between an inverted question and a normal-order question? Why invert? Is there a reason or a benefit? I love you? Do I love you?
13
votes
12answers
3k views

The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much”

I'd like to know how the sentence "That don't impress me much" sounds to a native English speaker. The phrase is the title of a song by Shania Twain, and to my eyes it contains a clear error. It is ...
20
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the origin of the 'do' construction?

Modern English seems to require this verb in several circumstances, where most other European languages don't seem to need it. (See? I just used it.) For example, in questions: "Do you have a dog?" ...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

English questions and negation with *do* in syntax

A former lecturer of mine once explained why, from a syntactic point of view, the English rule that negation and questions are formed with the auxiliary do follows from other syntactic facts about ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

“Don't got” — how common is it in American usage?

I often hear the usage "don't got" in American English as spoken on TV programmes. Recently I was watching season four of "Prison Break" and one character, an Asian computer wizard, repeatedly used ...