1
vote
1answer
424 views

Can “nor” be used without “neither”?

I came across this sentence: Cummings Motors, Smith Electric nor our subcontractors can be held liable. Is this a proper use of the word nor? I can understand Neither Cummings Motors nor ...
4
votes
4answers
766 views

“Either A, or B, or both”

I want to say that it's possible that at least one of {A,B} is true, and possibly both of them are true. Is it correct to phrase it as "either A, or B, or both are true".
1
vote
1answer
122 views

Is it good style to factor out the common root word of two (or more) prefixed compound words?

I see sometimes in conjunciton or disjunction, the common root of two or more compound words are factored out, for example, "super- and sub-script" (maybe bad example, but it suffices to describe the ...
2
votes
1answer
178 views

When a sentence contains both “not” and “or”, which one has priority?

I am changing a piece of text which current reads: Payment not deducted to also include the situation where payments are withheld. The suggested revision of text given to me is Payment not ...
0
votes
3answers
550 views

Is “tell neither X nor Y” equivalent to “not tell both X and Y” or “not tell either X and Y”? [closed]

Given the sentence "John told neither the boss nor the secretary.", which of the following has the same meaning? John did not tell both the boss and the secretary. John did not tell either ...
-1
votes
1answer
10k views

Using “are/is” after a list with “and/or” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Singular or plural following a list James and Mark are going to help you. Here, I use 'are' because the subject is plural. James or Mark are going to help you. ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

When should we use proximity rule in “either/or”, and “neither/nor”?

According to this link, if at least one of the nouns involved is plural then it should take the plural form of the verb. Otherwise, it should take the singular form of the verb. But in the last part ...
15
votes
3answers
37k views

Using “nor” in a list without “neither”

This is the classic usage of neither/nor: I would neither hide nor run away. But is the following construction grammatical? (More than two choices, no neither) I wasn't going to play dead. ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Use “or” or “nor”? [duplicate]

I've always wondered this but never asked. Given this statement: Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. Should it be or or nor? This is on Wikipedia so they are probably correct in saying ...