This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2
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1answer
95 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
1
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1answer
30 views

Other than - except for

Yesterday I used the sentence: "I know people except (for) you." and I have been told that the correct version is: "I know people other than you." Although I have been looking at related ...
1
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1answer
67 views

What's the meaning of “knocking in my knees” in this sentence? and one more

"I tug on my skirt, willing it to be longer, wanting it to cover the knocking in my knees." -from the Hunger Games What is the difference between "to cover my knees" and the sentence above? All I ...
1
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1answer
92 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
1
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1answer
246 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
1
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1answer
285 views

Explicit vs Specific

Recently I asked on the personal productivity Stack Exchange Is there specifically a reason why there isn't an ADHD tag? The context here, being that people with ADHD have issues with productivity, ...
1
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1answer
298 views

'Preciseness' and 'Precision'

By my current understanding of the two words, the sentence: The preciseness of this precision is very definite is grammatically correct. Correct me if I'm wrong, and if so; what is the ...
1
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1answer
472 views

Present Perfect vs Present + Adjective

What are the similarities and differences, for example, between "they are agreed" vs "they've agreed." Also, is there a formal grammatical term for the construct "they are agreed" ? ...
0
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1answer
38 views

What is the difference between amid and amidst?

I googled it and got the following answer: Amid and amidst are two words meaning the same thing. The meaning of these words is in connection with position of the object, person or situation – in the ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Surveillance or monitoring

What better way to express " I'm watching you (spy)" : Surveillance or monitoring (monitor)? What's the difference?
0
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1answer
72 views

“I was already gone” and “I had already gone”

Could you please explain the difference between I was gone and I had gone in the following sentence: When Tom got home I was already gone When Tom got home I had already gone
0
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1answer
52 views

Expressions to use in English about “for” and “to”

This question is about “for” and “to” in terms of destination or direction. Which is right? Are they both right? Could you give me more examples and information about the usage of for and to? a. Is ...
0
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1answer
95 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
0
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1answer
681 views

“father to” vs. “father of”

Would it be grammatically correct to write Mister X is father to a son and a daughter or should one preferably choose the preposition of? Mister X is father of a son and a daughter. ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
-1
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1answer
29 views

If you will have vs If you have

If you will have dinner at home, tell me. or If you have dinner at home, tell me. What is the difference between the two sentences? Which one sounds natural?
-1
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1answer
155 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
-1
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1answer
5k views

Difference between “at that time” / “that time”

What's the difference between at that time / that time? When I faced the issue previously, at that time John helped us to resolve it. When I faced the issue previously, that time John helped us ...
-1
votes
1answer
387 views

Is there difference between acne and pimples?

As title says: Is there difference between acne and pimples? As far as I know "acne" is skin condition, meaning that there are number of various "pimple" types on and under the skin.
-1
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1answer
138 views

Present perfect Present perfect continuous

What is the difference between those two sentences: a) A past activity in a time up to the present b) An activity which began in the past and continues up to the present Thank you!
-1
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1answer
95 views

What's the difference between the two sentences?

What's the difference between the two sentences? Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at [Name] University Submitted for the degree of Doctor of ...
-1
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1answer
7k views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
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0answers
35 views

Difference between “compact” and “accord”

What's the difference between those two words? But the Marshall Islands holds an important card: Under a 1986 compact, the roughly 70,000 residents of the Marshalls The debate over loss and ...
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0answers
34 views

“Composition” vs “comprisal”

I have found articles explaining the difference between compose and comprise but only for use in a sentence. What I need is a word to go in a header for a table column that says if a product consists ...
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0answers
85 views

shall we start and shall we get started

I was watching Ted 2 and then Morgan said "Shall we get started?", and I was wondering what is the difference between "Shall we start?" and "Shall we get started?"
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0answers
75 views

How did 'so' mean 'so that'?

so, adv. and conj. = 24. so .. that [=] in such a way, to such an extent, that 25. a. With omission of that, = sense 24. 26. a. so (that) , in limiting sense: On condition that, provided that, ...
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0answers
57 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
0
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0answers
36 views

“He is the instructor for this class” or “of this class”? Does the first one means he is the right person for this class?

I am new here and glad to join this site..It find it very instructive. Are these statements correct? In what context do we use them? He is the instructor for this class==> Does it mean: He is the ...
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0answers
20 views

Difference between etymologies of 'allocable' and 'allocatable'

Which one is more proper to use: 'allocable' or 'allocatable'? Sources say the former is derived from the original Latin word 'allocare', while the latter is a part-of-speech-variant of the English ...
0
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0answers
33 views

What is the difference between 'avoided with the use of' or 'by the use of'?

I am reading a text that refers to a ship accident that caused serious damage to the environment and was partly due to lack of knowledge of maritime English. The related sentence included this ...
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0answers
32 views

“There is nothing like that” vs “There is no such thing” vs “There is nothing similar”

What's the difference in meaning (if any) between these three sentences? Could you give some examples of common situations when you'd use one and no the others?
0
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0answers
56 views

Difference between “where” and "what' when asking for a place to visit

What is the difference between where and what when asking for a place to visit as follows: (a) Where will we visit in Yilan? (b) What will we visit in Yilan? Is there any difference in ...
0
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0answers
41 views

Is the structure “need for somebody to do something” grammatically correct?

When you compare the following two sentences: John does his own work and does not need for others to do his work in his stead, nor does he involve himself in the works of others. and John ...
0
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0answers
36 views

Which word will suit best? psalm vs. prayer

In this sentence: "The rector read out the _____" which word will suit best in the blank space? Is it psalm or prayer? What is the difference between these two words with respect to this ...
0
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0answers
50 views

Difference between spine-tingling and spine-chilling?

I've learned the word 'spine-tingling' in an Oxford book. While when I look up that word in the Websters dictionary,there only comes out 'spine-chilling'. I perceived them as synonyms but no evidence ...
0
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0answers
56 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
0
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0answers
113 views

What is the difference between “I forgot” and “I almost forgot”

"I forgot" and "I almost forgot" appear to be interchangeable phrases meaning "I did not remember". But the fact that I hear the longer one used more commonly (especially in scripted television or ...
0
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0answers
91 views

What's the difference between 'seize' and 'capture'?

Here's the sentence that is confusing to me. Only twice did it [the castle] feature in serious conflict when in 1484 it was A25 _______ by Richard III and in 1645 during the Civil War when ...
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0answers
78 views

Usage of face, confront and encounter

I'm confused with the usage of 3 words : face, confront and encounter. I found that face is used in general condition. However, I can't distinguish rest of the two words. In what circumstances these ...
0
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0answers
79 views

Enlighten the difference between phrasal verb and the verb followed by a preposition

I can't help getting confused! Though the question has been asked, the coherent answer describing why sometimes two names (ie phrasal verb and prepositional verb) are given to the same ...
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0answers
100 views

Incomprehensible vs Unintelligible

I'm having a hard time fathoming the difference between 'Incomprehensible' and 'Unintelligible' After some research, I assume that Incomprehensible would be used to express the inability to ...
0
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0answers
97 views

Is “a deep red in color” redundant?

The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from a light pink to a deep red in color. The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from light pink to ...
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0answers
77 views

Provider vs. caregiver

What is the difference provider vs. caregiver, in a medical context? According to the dictionary definitions, the former provides, the latter cares… but in a medical context providing is pretty much ...
0
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0answers
63 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
0
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0answers
1k views

Difference between “on the level” and “at the level”

Specifically I'd like to know when you would say "at the behavioral level" and when "on the behavioral level." It feels like there is a difference, but I can't put my finger on it.
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0answers
437 views

What are the difference between knelt and kneeled?

kneeled (Dictionary.com): to go down or rest on the knees or a knee. knelt (Dictionary.com): a simple past tense and past participle of kneel.
0
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0answers
180 views

Grandmother / Grandma

I have a question. Is it normal(common) for about 30-year-old man to call his grandmother 'grandma'? Doesn't he sound like a kid if using 'grandma'? Please help me! Thank you in advance.
0
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0answers
353 views

Sift and Sieve definition

Recently, while reading a novel, I stumbled upon the word 'sifted'. This immediately got me questioning the difference between the verb 'sift' and the verb 'sieve'. Some dictionaries say 'sieve' is ...
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0answers
2k views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
0
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0answers
155 views

What is the difference between “matter-containing media” and “matter”?

I'm reading the English Wikipedia entry titled "Radiation". You can find the word in the first paragraph, or by searching. What is the difference between "matter-containing media" and "matter"?