This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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4answers
3k views

Difference between 'I would like to be' & 'I want to be'

I would like to be and I want to be What is the difference between them? I think 'want to be' sounds stronger than 'like to be,' but I'm not sure if this is true.
0
votes
2answers
75 views

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed'?

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed', As both words gives the same meaning. Ex 1: He finished his homework. Ex 2: He completed his homework. And also how to use or ...
0
votes
2answers
355 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
0
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2answers
252 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
-1
votes
2answers
337 views

“Its color is brown” vs “It is brown in color” describing nouns

I was wondering what the difference between these two similar ways of describing a noun is. Its color is brown. or It is brown in color. If they are both proper usage please explain to me ...
-1
votes
2answers
151 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
1
vote
1answer
294 views

Present Perfect vs Present + Adjective

What are the similarities and differences, for example, between "they are agreed" vs "they've agreed." Also, is there a formal grammatical term for the construct "they are agreed" ? ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Writing one academic year to another academic year

I am a bit confused. When do we write 2014-2015 and when do we write 2014-15? Are the two the same? If yes, which is more formal?
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Send or Send across

How the words send and send across are used in email writing context? What are difference between these two? You can send your profile to 123@abc.com. Or You can send across your profiles ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

“father to” vs. “father of”

Would it be grammatically correct to write Mister X is father to a son and a daughter or should one preferably choose the preposition of? Mister X is father of a son and a daughter. ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
-1
votes
1answer
80 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
-1
votes
1answer
90 views

What's the difference between “family affair” and “family stuff”

I'll take one day leave for my family affair. I'll take one day leave for my family stuff. What's the different exactly? Or what situation is the best to use "affair", and "stuff" ?
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votes
1answer
3k views

Difference between “at that time” / “that time”

What's the difference between at that time / that time? When I faced the issue previously, at that time John helped us to resolve it. When I faced the issue previously, that time John helped us ...
-1
votes
1answer
328 views

Is there difference between acne and pimples?

As title says: Is there difference between acne and pimples? As far as I know "acne" is skin condition, meaning that there are number of various "pimple" types on and under the skin.
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votes
1answer
114 views

Present perfect Present perfect continuous

What is the difference between those two sentences: a) A past activity in a time up to the present b) An activity which began in the past and continues up to the present Thank you!
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

What's the difference between the two sentences?

What's the difference between the two sentences? Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at [Name] University Submitted for the degree of Doctor of ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
2
votes
0answers
132 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Difference between “on the level” and “at the level”

Specifically I'd like to know when you would say "at the behavioral level" and when "on the behavioral level." It feels like there is a difference, but I can't put my finger on it.
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What are the difference between knelt and kneeled?

kneeled (Dictionary.com): to go down or rest on the knees or a knee. knelt (Dictionary.com): a simple past tense and past participle of kneel.
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Grandmother / Grandma

I have a question. Is it normal(common) for about 30-year-old man to call his grandmother 'grandma'? Doesn't he sound like a kid if using 'grandma'? Please help me! Thank you in advance.
0
votes
0answers
60 views

Sift and Sieve definition

Recently, while reading a novel, I stumbled upon the word 'sifted'. This immediately got me questioning the difference between the verb 'sift' and the verb 'sieve'. Some dictionaries say 'sieve' is ...
0
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0answers
399 views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
0
votes
0answers
96 views

What is the difference between “matter-containing media” and “matter”?

I'm reading the english wikipedia entry titled "Radiation". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation you can find the word in the first paragraph, or by searching. so... What is the difference between ...
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votes
0answers
35 views

Why can you 'ask somebody', but must 'enquire/query OF somebody'?

[ODO:] [1.] ask something of somebody [2.] ask somebody something [ODO:] [3.] enquire something of somebody = (formal) to ask somebody something Why does 'ask' NOT require a ...