This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
votes
1answer
95 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Which is the correct usage when describing something that might happen? [on hold]

When we are describing risks of certain medical procedure, which is the correct usage: Pain increase or worsening of pain?
1
vote
3answers
65 views

I have never understood a word Alice “has said” or “said”

I am not sure about the use of present perfect in the subordinate clause. I want to say I've never understood Alice for as long as I've known her, so should I use the present perfect aspect in the ...
-1
votes
0answers
40 views

Difference between “till” and “until” [on hold]

I have a question. What's the difference between till and until?
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Using “across” after preposition “to”?

English is not my first language, and I often lose my confidence when I use across in my sentence. Could you please give me an advice on the sentence that I have written below? Health education ...
1
vote
4answers
4k views

Difference between control and manage?

They seem to function the same. Manage is even "control in action or use" according to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/manage. Control is a verb so isn't that in action as well? Thus, is it the ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

“He is the instructor for this class” or “of this class”? Does the first one means he is the right person for this class?

I am new here and glad to join this site..It find it very instructive. Are these statements correct? In what context do we use them? He is the instructor for this class==> Does it mean: He is the ...
-2
votes
0answers
49 views

What is the difference between ‘popular’ and ‘famous’?

popular liked, admired, or enjoyed by many people or by a particular person or group and famous known about by many people. Oxford Learners Dictionary When should we use popular ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”?

I found this link explained the difference between "etiquette" and "courtesy", as following the rules and being kind to others. The answer regarded "etiquette" is similar with "manners" If this ...
5
votes
4answers
4k views

Beg to differ - Why is there a need to beg for differ

Wouldn't 'Wish to differ' be better than 'Beg to differ'? A friend of mine asked me why I like to 'beg to differ', instead of 'wish to differ' or 'want to differ'. Any insight on the history of 'Beg ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the difference between Pharmaceutical and Medicine?

Can we use the word "pharmaceutical" exactly as same as "medicine"? For example:1-I bought too many medicines. 2-Medicines nowadays cost a lot. Can we replace the word :medicine/s" with ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Affect or Effect? [on hold]

I still don't really know, despite trying to read the definitions. I believe this sentence is correct but let me know. I seriously wish I could foresee the future and know of all the different ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Difference between “should”, “would” and “ought to”

The sentence: It's essential that the documents should be destroyed immediately. Why can't ought to be used in place of should and why can't I go for would?
-3
votes
0answers
48 views

Why is motherboad called as “motherboard”, not “fatherboard”? [duplicate]

My question is why we call motherboard as motherboard. Why not fatherboard? I am not satisfied with the answer which you provided on your website. Please answer this question.
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Functionality is working “fine” or “as expected”

Here the functionality is related with web Site responses. Now I'm looking for a sentence which would be preferable when, ABC functionality was not working before, (Explanation of some work ...
2
votes
2answers
15k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Motor transport vs Motorized transport

What is the difference between "motor transport" and "motorized transport". The dictionaries do not contain these collocations and relevant explanations. Are they interchangeable? As I understand, ...
-1
votes
0answers
51 views

I'm confused with do and does [on hold]

I saw this sentence and I got confused, it says: " You're getting too caught up in things that don't matter." Isn't suppose to be doesn't instead of don't?
0
votes
2answers
64 views
0
votes
0answers
44 views

“You are being it” - why? [on hold]

In this video the person says "you are being it" Why did he use present progressive? It seems strange to me, as the verb be in that context does not have any telicity.
1
vote
1answer
284 views

Explicit vs Specific

Recently I asked on the personal productivity Stack Exchange Is there specifically a reason why there isn't an ADHD tag? The context here, being that people with ADHD have issues with productivity, ...
1
vote
4answers
60 views

What is the difference between “perpetrator” and “transgressor”? [on hold]

I don't quite understand when one might be applied, but not the other. Also, is anyone who committed a transgression a transgressor, or might they also be perpetrators? Does it make a difference? ...
30
votes
4answers
24k views

Is it “despite” or “despite of”?

Should I always use 'despite' instead of 'despite of'?
0
votes
4answers
85 views

“Within the past year” vs. “In the past year”

I'm having an argument with a co-worker about phrasing. We have a document that makes reference to someone having experience working "in the past year", and later it states "must have experience ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [on hold]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
0
votes
2answers
669 views

History of “asylum seeker” versus “refugee”

What is the history of the term "asylum seeker" as a slightly pejorative replacement for the word "refugee"? The first reference to asylum seeker I can find is 1959 Amer. Polit. Sci. Rev. 53 ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
3
votes
5answers
11k views

Difference between “now” and “right now”

Is there any difference between the two following sentences? We can't connect to Outlook right now. We can't connect to Outlook now.
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Surveillance or monitoring

What better way to express " I'm watching you (spy)" : Surveillance or monitoring (monitor)? What's the difference?
3
votes
4answers
8k views

“Demonstratable” — a dictionary word, or just a well known hack?

Someone has just pointed out a mis-spelling on my site - demonstratable, as in "demonstratable experience of...". I can't see it in the New Oxford American Dictionary or the Oxford Dictionary of ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

Should I use present or past form of structure in a comment? [on hold]

I wanted to comment on a website on why I am interested to enroll on a course from the site. Should I say: 1) They provide a well structured courses. or 2) They provide a well structure ...
14
votes
5answers
23k views

What's the difference between “rent” and “hire” in British and American English?

The tip I used to teach was the verb, hire, should be used for things which are transportable hence, you hire a car, sports equipment, a boat, a bike etc. Rent, on the other hand, is primarily used ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

The Use of the Present Perfect. What is natural?

Sometimes, I got really confused by the use of the Present Perfect tense. Given the fact, that we don't have this structure in Russian, all we can is to base our knowledge on grammar rules. The ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Difference between etymologies of 'allocable' and 'allocatable'

Which one is more proper to use: 'allocable' or 'allocatable'? Sources say the former is derived from the original Latin word 'allocare', while the latter is a part-of-speech-variant of the English ...
0
votes
7answers
9k views

Use of the word “referable”

Can the word "referable" be used to denote something that can be referenced and what is the difference between "referable" and "referenceable"?
2
votes
2answers
44 views

Metaphysician vs Metaphysicist

A practitioner of physics is known as a physicist. It seems like it would logically follow that a practitioner of metaphysics would be known as a metaphysicist; yet, in every text I've read, a ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

A number off or a number of?

I am reading some technical documents and there is a list of items that make up the product. Throughout the document where there are multiple items, they are listed as 2 off, 3 off and so on. For ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Word Choice: Starting a sentence with “If not too long ago”

I know that the proper way to use "not too long ago" is: "Not too long ago, contractors used to build houses and sell them to dealers. It was the responsibility of the dealers to provide financing to ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

“Just” or “Even” with Dare?

There's well-known expression: Don't you dare... Is there a way to somehow make it stronger, to show more of your emotions when you "asking" person not to dare etc.? I've heard 2 cases, but don't ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What is the difference between amid and amidst?

I googled it and got the following answer: Amid and amidst are two words meaning the same thing. The meaning of these words is in connection with position of the object, person or situation – in the ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Difference between “leverage” and “utilize”

Sooner or later, you want to leverage Zend_Application better by creating your own resource plugins. Can leverage above be replaced by utilize?
0
votes
4answers
3k views

Difference between “convert” and “transform”

In the dictionary, the words "convert" and "transform" both have the meaning of changing the form of something. So how should I distinguish them? In what situation they are of the same meaning, and in ...
-1
votes
3answers
70 views

The difference between the phrases “leave the house” and “leave home” [closed]

Good evening! I began to learn English and I am wonder if there is any difference between the phrases "leave the house" and "leave home" (the context is "Usually I get up at 7 o'clock and leave ...
26
votes
6answers
21k views

“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
5
votes
2answers
66 views

What is the difference between “irreligious” and “non-religious”?

Irreligious (Dictionary.com 1st definition) not religious; not practicing a religion and feeling no religious impulses or emotions. Non-religious (Google definition) not relating to or ...
4
votes
3answers
30k views

“get well soon” OR “feel better”

When to use “Get Well Soon” and “Feel Better”, I mean in what situations? Should “Get Well Soon” be used only when person is unwell for many days? And should I use “Feel Better”, if colleague message ...
6
votes
3answers
9k views

“Arrogant” vs. “conceited”

I'm a bit confused as to the difference between arrogant and conceited. From my understanding, arrogance is the equivalent of being confident and letting everyone know how great you are. For example, ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
4
votes
5answers
16k views

“Referee” vs. “umpire” vs. “judge”

What is the difference between referee, umpire and judge? How about the use of other similar words? In sports like tennis, basketball, football and soccer, when do we use which?