This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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3
votes
4answers
9k views

Difference between ritual, festival, and ceremony

I am trying draw a line of distinction between these three events. As I understand it: Ritual is somewhat related to a religion. Festival is associated with a group of people and that brings ...
8
votes
4answers
4k views

What's the difference between notorious and infamous?

Are these two words synonymous or is there any nuance between these two words? Though they are used synonymously in sentences and also followed by the same preposition "for". I want to be expertly ...
5
votes
2answers
828 views

What is the difference between Philanthropy and Philanthropism?

In a the context of a paper, there's a paragraph-title: "Philanthropism in American culture", I'm in general only familiar with the word philanthropy, hence I'm not sure what an appropriate title ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Writing one academic year to another academic year

I am a bit confused. When do we write 2014-2015 and when do we write 2014-15? Are the two the same? If yes, which is more formal?
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Open/Closed vs Open/Close [on hold]

I recently saw a video of a sign that converts from the word 'open' to 'close' But I was wondering why in shops you can see the signs say 'OPEN / CLOSED' instead of 'OPEN / CLOSE' Are they both ...
3
votes
4answers
735 views

Why use “on-pass” / “onpass” instead of “pass on”?

Where I work some people use "on-pass" in sentences such as "We get data from the stock exchange and on-pass it to our customers" or "We need to on-pass that information to the other team". Does this ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

“elected” vs. “selected” [duplicate]

The board has elected the team members OR The board has selected the team members. Is there a difference between elected and selected in this sentence?
1
vote
2answers
56 views

What is the difference between “I have specialized” and “I have been specializing”? [on hold]

Since then I have specialised in this work. Since then I have been specialising in this work. Is my thinking right that the first case means I may not now necessarily specialise only in this work, ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

What is the difference between “launch” and “release” ?

I have doubt in differencing "launch" and "release". I have seen many softwares. Some of them uses "launch" and rest uses "release". Someone help me to figure it out.
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the difference between “determining” and “analysing” [on hold]

Do "determining" and "analysing" have different meanings? What is the difference between "determining" and "analysing"? [...] while analysing current price characteristics. [...] while determining ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Meaning difference when a word can be both a Noun and an Adjective

Does the meaning of "unknown" change depending on whether it is used as a noun or an adjective? The cause is still unknown. The cause is still an unknown. Although "unknown" is used as ...
2
votes
5answers
6k views
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Send or Send across

How the words send and send across are used in email writing context? What are difference between these two? You can send your profile to 123@abc.com. Or You can send across your profiles ...
0
votes
2answers
252 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed'?

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed', As both words gives the same meaning. Ex 1: He finished his homework. Ex 2: He completed his homework. And also how to use or ...
2
votes
2answers
45 views

The difference between 'credit' and 'accredit'?

Both verbs seem to mean the same thing -- to attribute 'X' to Mr. 'Y'. On looking it up, I found: credit - publicly acknowledge a contributor's role in the production of (something published or ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

“Ontology” vs. “ontography”

I have yet to find a good description of the difference between ontology and ontography. Can anyone help clarify?
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What's the difference between “zero in” and “home in”?

According to Oxford dictionary, both seem to mean "focus on" or "aim at" zero in: Take aim with a gun or missile/Focus one’s attention. home in: Move or be aimed toward (a target or destination) with ...
-5
votes
1answer
72 views

Is appeal correctly said in this sentence? [closed]

Is appeal correctly said in this sentence "I have appeal equipment experience"? What is a better word I can use? PS: I really went with "broad experience" Thanks duskn
6
votes
5answers
10k views

Difference between “somewhere” and “anywhere”

Do you live anywhere near him? Do you live somewhere near him? Is there any difference between these two sentences?
9
votes
4answers
7k views

What are: province, territory, protectorate, state…?

Often a country will have regions called "provinces" or "states". Other times they are called "territories" and "protectorates". Is there a generic term for these words? Is there a full list of ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Correct way to introduce yourself [duplicate]

In an interview, what is the correct way to introduce yourself? Some use "myself" and their name, and some use "I'm ___." I'm confused about what I use. Please guide me.
-2
votes
0answers
34 views

Why can you 'ask somebody', but must 'enquire/query OF somebody'?

[ODO:] [1.] ask something of somebody [2.] ask somebody something [ODO:] [3.] enquire something of somebody = (formal) to ask somebody something Why does 'ask' NOT require a ...
1
vote
3answers
61 views

Hyperbolic vs Hyperbolical

I just looked up the word "hyperbolic" in the 3rd edition of "The New Oxford American Dictionary", and the second definition says "(of language) exaggerated; hyperbolical." When I go to hyperbolical, ...
9
votes
4answers
10k views

Rule for using “for” vs. “to”

A Brazilian friend speaks English very well, but has a very unique habit: it seems often that she needs to use "for" but she instead uses "to", and vice-versa. For instance: The present is to ...
2
votes
2answers
33 views

“Aforementioned” vs. “In question”

As I know, the words "Aforementioned" and "In question" have a similar meaning and imply referring to something that has already been mentioned, but when I looked up at the internet i found out that ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

“error” vs. “mistake”

I think I understand the difference between “error” and “mistake”, but today I saw this article about Google’s self-driving cars that has the following sentence: A lot of this won’t be a surprise, ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

What is the difference between “fine” and “good”?

What is the difference between fine and good? Please suggest the proper usage.
3
votes
7answers
2k views

Being Clever vs Being Wise

A sage is wise. That young woman is clever. Both of them (I think) are good at not getting into unwanted trouble, and both are good at solving problems. So.. Is there a difference between being ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

Interpretation of “need not”

What is the meaning of "need not" in the following sentence? The amount withdrawn need not be repaid. Does it always mean that it must not be repaid, or does it also extend to persons who may ...
8
votes
3answers
648 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Shipping costs or shipment costs?

shipping costs or shipment costs? I want to know the correct form and the difference between them, if there is one. Thank you!
0
votes
1answer
67 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
1
vote
3answers
66 views

difference between “estate” and “property”

What is the difference between "estate" and "property" in the context of this sentence (from Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility)? The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
0
votes
2answers
352 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Difference between upcoming and forthcoming [closed]

What is the difference between upcoming vs forthcoming? For example, which one is the correct : Forthcoming Movies OR Upcoming Movies
1
vote
1answer
100 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
11
votes
4answers
54k views

Semantic difference between “engine” and “motor” [closed]

Is there a semantic difference between engine and motor? In some cases, would the use of one or the other word be technically incorrect?
1
vote
0answers
15 views

Difference between while and whilst [duplicate]

What is the difference between 'while' and 'whilst'? When to use them?
-1
votes
3answers
994 views

Words that change meaning when a letter is added/removed/changed

Want to know if there is a collective word to describe these kind of words that change their meanings in an opposite way (rather than irrelevantly) when a single letter is added/removed/changed so ...
4
votes
1answer
126 views

How did we get ‘deft’ and ‘daffy’ from “daft”?

[ Etymonline for 'daft (adj.)'] Old English gedæfte "gentle, becoming," ... from PIE * dhabh- "to fit together" (see fabric). Sense of "mild, well-mannered" (c. 1200). [ Etymonline for ...
0
votes
1answer
174 views

Questions about “get” vs. “was given” and the Passive Voice

What is the difference in meaning between got and was given? I understand that got is in the active voice, was given is in the passive voice, and that they are different verbs. But what is the ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Exhortation v. Hortation - difference

Exhortation v. Hortation Are there any difference in (a) the usage and (b) the meaning of the two? It seems to me that Hortation is an obsolete word because in OED there is only a very brief ...
4
votes
1answer
8k views

“Seek” vs.“search”

I've been wondering, what is the difference between seek and search? When should one be preferred over the other?
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

What is the difference between autonomous and automatic

I would like to know the difference between autonomous sensor automatic sensor Thanks in advance.
-2
votes
5answers
10k views

Use of “Who am I” and “Who I am?”

I am confused between these two: "Who am I" and "Who I am" I read this phrase: "Do you know who am I?" - The person was threatening someone. But what is the main difference in using these? "Do you ...
-1
votes
2answers
48 views

Is there any difference? [closed]

Is there any fundamental difference in meaning here? I would understand perfectly if the woman had done something wrong and another woman were blaming her but this isn't the case. I would understand ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

'Refer' vs 'make reference'

What is the difference between saying "He referred to something" and "He made reference to something"? Is it a question of mood? Emphasis? Agency? Different paths to English since the latter is a ...