This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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1answer
12 views

Tallest vs Loftiest

How is the usage of the two words different? I think they mean one and the same. Are they?
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0answers
15 views

What is This “if”? [on hold]

He could not believe that, had the Englishman known how much he was at risk, he would have hazarded his grandson. - 1)If the English man had known how much he(Englishman) was at risk, he would have ...
1
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2answers
5k views

Difference between “aim” and “purpose”

The explanation in the dictionary of an "aim" is The aim of something that you do is the purpose for which you do it or the result that it is intended to achieve. and the explanation of a ...
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3answers
75 views

What's the difference between e.g. “room 5” and “number 5”?

Is it correct to use the word ‘number’ meaning "hotel room'? Thanks in advance.
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “to allege” and “to claim”?

What is the difference between to allege and to claim? Can I use them interchangeably? Or perhaps I can only allege something illegal? For example, from CNET: Over the past several months, the ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “pure” will(power)?

In English, we use the phrase "sheer force" much more often than "pure force" (Google Ngram). And willpower. What is the difference, in meaning and usage, between the two (and is there a reason for ...
3
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2answers
528 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
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4answers
4k views

Cipher vs. Cypher

I recently came across a (not very well written) piece of writing in which "cipher" and "cypher" were used interchangeably. Is there any difference between them, or are they two spellings of the exact ...
-3
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0answers
165 views

First, second and third conditional [migrated]

I found this sentence in my workbook: If you were a king, what'd your wife be called?" Why was the ‘second conditional’ used here? That situation is completely impossible, so I think, it ...
7
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2answers
9k views

What is the difference between “vouch” and “guarantee”?

To me, there is a difference between "vouch" and "guarantee". To vouch for someone, you are stating that because of your relationship, you have knowledge that their character is good. However, I ...
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votes
3answers
17k views

“Flammable” versus “Combustible”

In Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition (2003), the first definition of combustible is "capable of combustion," the first definition of combustion is "an act or instance of ...
0
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1answer
44 views

What is the difference between a forefather and an ancestor?

Stumbled upon this question today while going through synonyms of various terms. I was advised that they are not synonymous to each other. Please advise.
3
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2answers
7k views

“give me an offer” vs “make me an offer”

Which is correct: "give me an offer" vs. "make me an offer"? Is there some difference in meaning?
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2answers
44 views

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct? [duplicate]

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct?. In some published papers, I either see 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' used in some sentences or phrases. Can someone justify and comment?
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3answers
822 views

“Wise man” vs. “wise guy”

Two very similar expressions yet quite opposite connotations. Wise man is an older phrase but wise guy is a newer one. I found two possible connections to wise man. There is the surname Wiseman ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
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vote
3answers
7k views

Does “positive” mean good and “negative” bad?

Some examples are a negative connotation, Don't be so negative!, or Be positive! Is it proper to use these words this way? The denotations of negative and positive support this use weakly. However, I ...
0
votes
1answer
577 views

The use of “actually” and “whatsoever”

The word, actually means to "emphasize a fact or a comment, or that something is really true." So why is whatsoever used in this sentence You have no right whatsoever to read what is written ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Difference between “needed” and “necessary”

What is the difference between those two words? Example sentence: "this can greatly reduce the needed | necessary effort". I found some posts saying that necessary is more urgent?! Are there more ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

have somebody do something vs. have somebody doing something

History, as recounted by the victors, had the capitalists winning. I think that the above sentence means that history caused the capitalists to win. Can I say History, as recounted by the victors, ...
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3answers
5k views

What is the difference between “into” and “onto”?

I see both used, at times, almost interchangeably. What are the general guidelines?
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2answers
74 views

“Room ahead” vs “Head room”

Consider the following sentences: I'm not sure if I still have some room ahead. And: I'm not sure if I still have some head room. Besides being shorter, and the order of words, what is the ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Difference between “doesn't seem to rain” & “doesn't seem to be raining” [closed]

What's the difference between 'It doesn't seem to rain.' and 'It doesn't seem to be raining.' ? Is it that the first means "the rain didn't occur often", and the second means "it doesn't rain in the ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Problems with the meanings of the words 'already' and 'yet'

I have a problem with understanding the difference between 'already' and 'yet'. Are these examples correct and do they mean the same? Have they already done it? Have they done it yet? ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

Meaning and use of “would have to be” in this sentence

I'm a beginner of English and really appreciate that you can help me learn more. I noticed a sentence: I think all the girls in the anime are awesome, but my favorites would have to be Nozomi and ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Amass vs accumulate - is there a difference or can these be used interchangeably?

These two words mean pretty much the same thing. But I couldn't understand the difference. I picked these two examples from google translate: investigators have yet to accumulate enough ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning or usage between slightly and a bit? For example, the sentence: I thought she was younger than me, but in fact she proved to be even slightly older. Is ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

The Difference Between “not unknown to” and “known to”?

An non-native English-speaking friend of mine came across the phrase "not unknown to" as in "tragedy is not unknown to the Kennedy family" and asked the question, "What's the difference between 'not ...
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3answers
29k views
14
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5answers
19k views

Difference between “should” and “ought to”

What is the difference between You should go and You ought to go? I rarely use the latter.
0
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2answers
46 views

a “piece” vs. an “item” of clothing

What is the difference between an item of clothing and a piece of clothing? Can I say "three pieces of clothing" or "three items of clothing"? Are they used identically?
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votes
5answers
13k views

What's the difference between “rent” and “hire” in British and American English?

The tip I used to teach was the verb, hire, should be used for things which are transportable hence, you hire a car, sports equipment, a boat, a bike etc. Rent, on the other hand, is primarily used ...
0
votes
2answers
243 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed'?

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed', As both words gives the same meaning. Ex 1: He finished his homework. Ex 2: He completed his homework. And also how to use or ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

What's the difference between “zero in” and “home in”?

According to Oxford dictionary, both seem to mean "focus on" or "aim at" zero in: Take aim with a gun or missile/Focus one’s attention. home in: Move or be aimed toward (a target or destination) with ...
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3answers
4k views

Difference between 'later' and 'later on'

Is there any difference between the usage of 'later' and 'later on'? I'll see you later. I'll finish it later on.
4
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1answer
2k views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
0
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0answers
34 views

Difference between “on the level” and “at the level”

Specifically I'd like to know when you would say "at the behavioral level" and when "on the behavioral level." It feels like there is a difference, but I can't put my finger on it.
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2answers
58 views

Give some examples using “food, cuisine, dish, menu and ingredient” [closed]

I have troubles using some words about food and I cannot feel the subtle differences of their usage. I'd like to get some help with examples using these various words. Food Cuisine dishes menu meal ...
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3answers
10k views

Difference between 'just' and 'only'

'Just' and 'only' carry a similar meaning, and while my feel for language usually helps me decide which one to use, there are times when I'm at a loss. From my understanding, 'just' is used as a ...
0
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2answers
74 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as "the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance" Why is it stated ...
42
votes
10answers
18k views

Is it “alright” or “allright”?

In practice I find both spellings being used. From a logical point of view, "allright" (as in: "all's right — everything is fine") seems correct. However, I recall hearing that "alright" is the ...
1
vote
3answers
39 views

Hyperbolic vs Hyperbolical

I just looked up the word "hyperbolic" in the 3rd edition of "The New Oxford American Dictionary", and the second definition says "(of language) exaggerated; hyperbolical." When I go to hyperbolical, ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the difference between “recall” and “remember”?

As an example, in a legal setting: Do you recall what color the car was? Do you remember what color the car was? Which would be more appropriate?
5
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4answers
16k views

Difference in “capable” and “able”

What is the difference in being physically capable and physically able? When would one choose one over the other?
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5answers
179 views

It got you paralysed vs It paralysed you

I know "get" has a lot of meanings. But what is this one - to cause something to happen? I do not think it is "have sth done" but not sure of course. It got you paralysed. What is the difference ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

usage of dissimilar

This sentence is grammatically correct. But does it make sense to use word dissimilar to avoid repetition of different here? the results would be absolutely dissimilar if there is any slight ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
0
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4answers
330 views

What is the difference between “leading” and “winning” in a game?

Is it correct to use 'winning' or 'leading' when referring to the current state of a match/game? e.g. for a game between Patriots and Broncos in progress, if Patriots have scored higher points than ...
3
votes
3answers
77 views

How can “for” be classed as a coördinating conjunction in the following instances?

How can for be classed as a coördinating conjunction in the following instances? I cannot give you any money, for I have none. He deserved to succeed, for he worked hard. Blessed are the merciful, ...