This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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4
votes
1answer
5k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Is there a difference between negligible and neglectable?

According to wiktionary.org they are synonyms. However, most words have a slight difference in the way or in which context they are used. I would like to know those differences. For example, when one ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Founder or co founder? [duplicate]

I created a website one year ago and a friend joined me on the project seven months later. So i worked one year on it and he worked four months. I searched on many website to understand the ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Difference between “vague”, “unclear” and “ambiguous”

What is the difference between "vague", "unclear" and "ambiguous"? All three have the same meaning to me, so when should each be used?
1
vote
10answers
8k views

What is the difference between “legacy” and “inheritance”?

Can someone explain the difference between legacy and inheritance?
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
7
votes
3answers
14k views

Is it “flotation” or “floatation”?

Is the difference between flotation and floatation a US/UK difference or something else? I think I did see floatation in some physics book.
4
votes
6answers
486 views

Difference between “would have + past participle” and “would + bare infinitive” in the main clause of a past subjunctive sentence

I'm wondering about the difference in meaning, if any, between the two sentences in each of the following examples. Example 1. a. If he was a serious leader, tackling the debt would have been a ...
12
votes
4answers
16k views

“Arab” or “Arabic” or “Arabian”?

Are these adjectives interchangeable? I always hear: 'An Arab man.' but never 'An Arabic man.' and I always hear 'Arabic coffee' but never hear 'Arab coffee.'
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Difference between 'sort of', 'kind of' and 'somewhat'?

I was told that these three phases have the same meanings, but I want to know if there are any differences between them: sort of kind of somewhat
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “to foot the bill” and “to fill the bill”

I already knew the expression, "to foot the bill," and there is also, "to fill the bill." I initially thought this was just a variant, but on closer examination it seems to be an altogether different ...
-1
votes
3answers
51 views

Difference between “acting for” and “standing for”

What is the difference between “acting for” and “standing for”? See this text for example (H. Pitkin, The Concept of Representation):
1
vote
1answer
953 views

what is the difference between 'same', 'typical' and 'similar'?

What is the difference between 'same', 'typical' and 'similar', as all conveys the same meaning.
3
votes
3answers
942 views

Difference between “personal goals” and “Long/short-term objectives”

I've been asked by my employer to complete a "performance review". Within the context of my role at the company, it asks me for my "Long and Short Term Objectives" and my "Personal Goals". ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Availability to meet vs availability to meeting?

I'm writing a thank you email to thank a person for finding the time to meet with me. Which of the following two forms is correct, and why? I wanted to thank you again for your availability to meet ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

“Come Hell or high water” vs “Lord willing and the creek don't rise”

Recently I've wondered about two idioms which have a strange relationship. Come Hell or high water and Lord willing and the creek don't rise Grammatical accuracy, alternative ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

“Bump one's head on something” vs. “against something”

Can anyone help me understand the difference between bumping one's head on something and bumping it against it? Is there any substantial difference or are they used interchangeably?
4
votes
7answers
12k views

“Rebellion” vs. “revolution”

What is the difference between rebellion and revolution? These two words seem almost the same, except that rebellion is generally more distasteful. Dictionary.com lists definitions of rebellion: ...
9
votes
4answers
924 views

What is the relationship between canon and cannon?

The spelling is similar and the meaning so different. Wiktionary indicates that there might be some relation by linking to canon from cannon but I didn't see any specific statements regarding their ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Volunteerism vs volunteering

What would be the difference between saying "I engage in volunteerism" and saying "I engage in volunteering" ? Volunteerism is defined as "the use or involvement of volunteer labor, especially in ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Are there different noun forms of 'complex' and 'complicated?'

There are subtle differences between complex and complicated. As far as I can tell, though, they both merge into one noun form: complexity. Merriam-Webster has an entry for complicatedness, but that ...
-1
votes
4answers
626 views

Difference between 'I would like to be' & 'I want to be'

I would like to be and I want to be What is the difference between them? I think 'want to be' sounds stronger than 'like to be,' but I'm not sure if this is true.
-3
votes
1answer
44 views

Are apple trees “loaded” or “laden” with fruit? [duplicate]

Laden adj. having or carrying a large amount of something Loaded adj. filled with a great quantity Are fruit-trees laden or loaded with fruit?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Difference between “laden” and “loaded”

In A. E. Housman's With rue my heart is laden: WITH rue my heart is laden For golden friends I had, For many a rose-lipt maiden And many a lightfoot lad. he refers to laden as loaded, ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “jargon” and “technical terms”

Each subject matter has its own set of terms called jargon which is expressed in its particular grammatical rules. Technical terminology or Term of Art is the specialized vocabulary of any specialized ...
16
votes
8answers
11k views

Difference between “condo” and “apartment”

I have never really understood the connotation of someone calling their domicile a condo over the word apartment. I have a vague feeling the former is fancier and more up-scale, but are there any ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

different meanings of 'number'

My motherlanguage is german, in german there are several words for slightly different meanings of the term number, or do I just not know their english counterparts? Examples: German term Ziffer: ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Can one use “may” and “might” in the same sentence?

Is it possible to use may and might in the same sentence to describe a potential outcome? For example: While Sara may recognise the car, Paul might not.
-1
votes
2answers
37 views

Which is the better word: “byproduct” or “waste”?

At the construction and demolition project we get a lot of waste. And some materials are going to be recycled to make new products. Which word is more appropriate for describing these materials, ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between “except” and “besides”

What is the difference between except and besides? When do we use each of them?
1
vote
2answers
109 views

Are “bear someone out” and “back someone up” sometimes interchangeable?

Back up - v.tr - to support Bear out - v.tr - to prove right or justified, confirm, corroborate. In the following sentences, are "bear someone out" and "back someone up" perfectly ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“get well soon” OR “feel better”

When to use “Get Well Soon” and “Feel Better”, I mean in what situations? Should “Get Well Soon” be used only when person is unwell for many days? And should I use “Feel Better”, if colleague message ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “to allege” and “to claim”?

What is the difference between to allege and to claim? Can I use them interchangeably? Or perhaps I can only allege something illegal? For example, from CNET: Over the past several months, the ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

Accomplishment vs. Achievement (implicit superiority)

I elsewhere saw the difference between the two explained thusly: accomplished denoted "completed for someone else's benefit", achieved "completed by oneself". I consider it a one off, but can anyone ...
0
votes
2answers
54 views

aberrant vs errant

Aberrant seems a subset of the word errant. Thus, what's the effect of the Latin prefix 'ab-'? What are the similarities and differences? What's this phenomenon called, in which a prefix or suffix ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“endure” vs “perdure” vs “persist”

perdure and endure both mean "to remain in existence", and persist means "continue to exist". So are there any differences among the three verbs?
1
vote
0answers
37 views

When can a singular verb be used for multiple subjects separated with 'and'? [duplicate]

I read "Are" vs. "is" with compound subjects and http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm, so this doesn't duplicate, because I ask about disparate subjects. I also tried ...
2
votes
4answers
11k views

“Interested in knowing” versus “interested to know”

I am interested to know if, for some, there is a subtle difference between the two phrases in the title. I am equally interested in knowing if there is a subtle difference.
1
vote
0answers
44 views

What is difference between “huge” and “massive”? [closed]

What are the differences in meaning between huge and massive?
4
votes
8answers
29k views

What is the difference between “house” and “home”?

What are the differences in meaning between house and home? When do I use one or the other?
0
votes
1answer
73 views

disputant vs disputer

Any differences in meaning? The dictionary doesn't explain. Google Ngrams This dispute between the king and the estate of William Bankes, owner of coastal land including Corfe Castle, concerned ...
23
votes
7answers
91k views

Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless

I am never quite sure whether to use nevertheless or nonetheless; they seem almost synonymous to me, but I think I might be missing a subtle distinction. Is there a difference, and if so, how do I ...
3
votes
3answers
384 views

What is the difference between “rate” and “grade”?

What is the difference between "rate" and "grade"? When I am awarding points 0-20 for a homework assignment, do I rate the homework or do I grade it? Or perhaps both are appropriate?
0
votes
2answers
144 views

What's the difference between “Mediary” and “Intermediary”?

I can't find a definition for Mediary, I thought they kind of mean the same thing. But how they each precisely defined? And can someone use a good example of both? Thanks
2
votes
4answers
12k views

Difference between “unto” and “to”

What are the differences between "unto" and "to"? It seems that in many contexts where the word "unto" is used, "to" could be substituted and would be perfectly correct. It reminds me of ...
2
votes
2answers
100 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Does the term 'noon' have exact meaning? [closed]

Say I have a meeting at 10:00 and want to postpone it to around 13:00, can I ask the other to "postpone it to noon, around 13:00"? Or the term 'noon' means exactly 12:00?
-2
votes
2answers
44 views

And/Or and Except/Only

I have the following sentence: Who am I? Picture James Bond, except without the British Accent. Or the six-pack. My question is about two words: except versus only; also, or versus and. Seems ...