This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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4
votes
4answers
9k views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA word-for-word has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". Word-by-word has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word translation" (but some with "...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

what are the differences between “past week” and “last week”?

What are the the differences in meaning between the following phrases: past week And last week Please try to explain it with as many examples as possible!
5
votes
6answers
12k views

What's the difference between Media and Press

What's the difference between Media and Press, I think that press for newspapers and media for TV, can anyone give us details about that?
4
votes
2answers
48 views

What is the difference between “doing something” and “on doing something”?

I don't understand the difference between "doing something" and "on doing something". I am going to make up a few examples. (1) On cleaning up my bedroom, I found my valuable watch. (2) Cleaning up ...
2
votes
4answers
7k views

“make a change” or “make a difference”

I was reading a book with tests when I encountered this question: < "If you quit your job, you'll have to make do with fewer material possessions. Those who've decided to (make a change/make a ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

“I feel myself unhappy” vs “I feel unhappy”

I feel myself unhappy. The above sentence strikes me as somewhat peculiar. What is the difference between "I feel myself unhappy" and "I feel unhappy"?
1
vote
2answers
52 views

“reasons to” vs “reasons for”

Which of the following is the better or more correct usage when the noun reason is plural? I can't do it. There are several reasons to it. vs I can't do it. There are several reasons for it.
0
votes
2answers
247 views

If you will have vs If you have

If you will have dinner at home, tell me. or If you have dinner at home, tell me. What is the difference between the two sentences? Which one sounds natural?
2
votes
4answers
19k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a "...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Difference between individual and standalone [on hold]

I am wondering what is difference between these two words. My dictionary says that they both stands for the same thing. Is that true? I do not think so. Please can you explain me usage of both of ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Is it ever appropriate to use “where” instead of “because” or “since”?

I work at a large company (4,000+ employees) where a lot of people use the word "where" in a way that I firmly believe is incorrect. They use "where" at the beginning of a sentence instead of using "...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Convolve vs. convolute

I understand that for common usage these words have distinct meanings. However in mathematics there is a process called convolution, and sometimes you hear "you need to convolve X" and sometimes "you ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Can the word 'fluently' be interchanged with 'fluidly' in this sentence, “I see I can't write fluidly either.” [closed]

I was asking a question concerning the use of the words 'fluently' or 'fluidly' in a particular sentence. I did not mean to post it as an Answer.
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “scream” and “shriek”?

I’m now curious because while I was updating the Wikipedia page for Onomatopoeias, I saw two different sets of sounds for scream and shriek. The sounds listed under these two sections seem to overlap. ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

Is there a difference between “on condition that” and “provided that”?

Do the terms "provided that" and "on condition that" mean the same? Or is there any difference in usage? The means will be available provided that the state will allocate its part of financing vs. ...
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Take your hands out “of / from” your pockets

Which is proper: Take your hands out of your pockets. Take your hands out from your pockets. Is there any difference in American English and British English? P.S. Also reading the ...
-3
votes
0answers
22 views

Is there any difference between the meanings of “phonetic translation”, “phonetic transcription”, and “transliteration”? [on hold]

I was asked to provide phonetic translation for legal name (as original characters are none-Latin characters), does it mean I must make transliteration (or phonetic transcription)?
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Why “It is raining?” instead of “Rain is coming”? [on hold]

People will normally say, "It's raining". Why can't it be, "Rain is coming?"
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Difference between traumata and traumas?

Why are there two plural forms of trauma? How do traumas and traumata differ in origin and nature? Is one incorrect?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Day off or off day? [on hold]

What is the difference between 'day off' and 'off day'? What I found is 'day off' means a holiday when you are not working, while 'off day' is the day when you do not work up to the mark. Can anyone ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Send or Send across

How the words send and send across are used in email writing context? What are difference between these two? You can send your profile to 123@abc.com. Or You can send across your profiles ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Use of “upon” or “on” in phrase

In a spiritual phrase the segment says ...have mercy on me, a sinner. could you use "upon" rather than "on"? I feel that using "upon" personalizes the phrase better. Or is my grammar failing?
6
votes
4answers
14k views

What's the difference between “persuade” and “convince”?

When should "persuade" be preferred over "convince", and vice versa?
3
votes
2answers
38 views

What is the difference between “history” and “log”?

In computer science, "log" is often used over "history" when keeping track of events (see /log and .log in Unix filesystems, and "git log" with the Git version control system). I can see that "log" is ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

The difference between “past continuous” and “present perfect continuous”

Let's consider the following context: You come to the office on Saturday and see somebody finish some actions and now (s)he is sitting at your workplace (you didn't expect to meet anyone), ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

The rules of the game vs. the laws of the game

Do rule and law have the same meaning when you talk about an activity like a game? I came across this sentence in the Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's Dictionay: "Match officials should not ...
-1
votes
2answers
56 views

Help with the difference in the meaning of the verbs [closed]

What is the difference between to own and to possess? I own a phone and I possess a phone. Explain me the difference?
4
votes
3answers
667 views

Explicit vs Specific

Recently I asked on the personal productivity Stack Exchange Is there specifically a reason why there isn't an ADHD tag? The context here, being that people with ADHD have issues with productivity, ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Notable English grammar rules changes in modern grammar books

Modern English grammar books like English Grammar In Use, first published in 1985, for example, has four editions till now, I am wondering if there are any notable worthy examples of changes in modern ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Usage of “like” for listing examples in scientific papers [duplicate]

Can I use "like" as well as "such as" in formal writings, such as thesis? My hunch is that "like" is way less formal, but maybe I'm wrong. Each pattern can impose constraints upon the text, such ...
18
votes
8answers
4k views

Is it awkward to call a wound “heavy”?

According to the definition of Oxford Online Dictionary, the adjective heavy means: Of more than the usual size, amount, or intensity 4. Very important or serious If someone is heavily ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

“aid in” with the noun

I often find it confusing when to use "aid in" instead of "aid." A similar question has been posted before, but this thread mainly addresses when a gerund, or participle is the object of the ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Friends are constantly visiting and friends constantly visit [closed]

I am not native English speaker and new to English. Please let me know what is the difference between below sentences and which one is correct. His friends are constantly visiting him. His friends ...
-2
votes
1answer
24 views

Which is correct, in other to or in order to [closed]

In other or in order to install Lotus Notes Traveler to receive emails on your phones you will need to install the Company's Passcode Policy first.
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Which is correct and why are they different? [closed]

"How does someone can look so beautiful" or "how can someone look so beautiful" My friend told me that the second one is correct but I'm not so sure. What are the differences and why
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Difference between deterrent and hindrance?

I have this sentence: In India analysts attributed high cost of Apple's devices to be a major deterrent to sales of iPhone that completes with android based smartphones. My question is why ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

What differences are there between “famous” and “famed”?

We sometimes see both cases, such as "the famous church" and "the famed church". In what situation or objective do you use "famous" and "famed"? Please advise.
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Use of “beware” and “be aware” in this particular situation

We have a large motorized moving gate. I am designing a sign to warn people to stay clear of it. So which one should it be? "Beware of moving gate!" or "Be aware of moving gate!"
14
votes
5answers
9k views
3
votes
1answer
17k views

'Preclude' vs 'Exclude' vs 'Prevent'

I'm trying to really understand how the word preclude differs from either exclude or include. Merriam Webster defines preclude as to make impossible by necessary consequence : rule out in advance ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

What is the difference between “over the span of” and “in a span of”? [closed]

1: This task has been done in a span of 2 days. 2: This task has been done over the span of 2 days. I want to know which one in correct and basically what is the difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
12k views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
3
votes
0answers
44 views

Is either usage of until right? [closed]

"until I have money, I don't care about it" vs "until I don't have money, I don't care about it"?
4
votes
1answer
25k views

“Never” vs. “never ever”

Example: I never use this cup. I never ever use this cup. What is the difference between these two sentences?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

“All” or “all of” before proper noun (place) [duplicate]

Question: "All or "All of" before a proper noun (place)? Example sentence: All of North Carolina gets hot in the summer time. (Or, all?) And what about when referring to all people in a certain ...
2
votes
4answers
9k views

Differences between “knowledge” and “experience”

Context: I'm exploring how people acquire, share and efficiently apply knowledge and experience; structuring my thoughts by writing axioms, propositions and formulae. When writing, I struggle with ...
13
votes
5answers
17k views

'Clean' vs 'Clear'

What is their difference? Please provide an example (or two if the use as verb or adjective differentiates their meanings).
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Difference between “thrown under a bus” and “thrown to the wolves”?

Is there any difference between the phrases "thrown under a bus" and "thrown to the wolves"? As far as I can tell they mean basically the same thing, but the "bus" phrases came into existence after ...
12
votes
1answer
15k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?