This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
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0answers
12 views

Can 'do' be used in Shall I? conversations?

Suppose we have a conversation. Shall I open the window? No, it's OK. I'll ____ it. Which verb is better here? do or open?
1
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4answers
99 views

Can you use “get” in a past tense sentence

I had a voice over where I was asked to record the following line in a script: "Our small initiative turned into a sizeable movement with the support of influencers, who helped spread the word and ...
2
votes
1answer
881 views

Is it possible to use “ every second Saturday” instead of “every other Saturday”?

Is it possible to use " every second Saturday" instead of "every other Saturday"? What about "every two Saturdays"? Is it same as "every other Saturday"?
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Difference between elegancy and elegance

I recently saw someone use the word "elegancy" for the first time in forever, and it set me wondering about (and wandering about) why the synonym "elegance" appears to be the preferred noun. I ...
13
votes
2answers
13k views

What is the distinction between “role” and “rôle” [with a circumflex]?

One of our users, Stan Rogers, mentioned there was such a distinction, I think, when he answered a question and talked about how the orthography of foreign loan-words typically changes to conform with ...
3
votes
5answers
30k views

Difference between “when” and “if” in a sentence

I was doing a grammar activity and filling in sentences when I came across the instruction: "fill in when or if." I was wondering, since these two can be used in a lot of same sentences, what is the ...
2
votes
2answers
656 views

What is the difference between a forefather and an ancestor?

Stumbled upon this question today while going through synonyms of various terms. I was advised that they are not synonymous to each other. Please advise.
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What is the difference between “police officer” and “policeman”? [on hold]

Is there a difference in these words? if yes, in what occasion I should to use these words?
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2answers
5k views

The difference between ''cringy'' and ''cringey'' [closed]

Can anyone explain to me the difference between these two words? I looked up them in a dictionary but I find the both meanings to be quite similar. Also, is there any difference in their ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Equal vs Equivalent: Finer differences in meaning and usage?

Equal vs Equivalent: Finer differences in meaning and usage? What would be the subtler differences & similarities? Examples & scenarios where: Only one can be used Both can be used One ...
1
vote
1answer
394 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
0
votes
3answers
47 views

Good decision I “made” / “have made” today

As a non-native English speaker, I'm a little bit confused. Should I say: The only good decision I made today was to ... or The only good decision I have made today was to ... What is the ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Is there a difference between “on condition that” and “provided that”?

Do the terms "provided that" and "on condition that" mean the same? Or is there any difference in usage? The means will be available provided that the state will allocate its part of financing vs. ...
-2
votes
1answer
47 views

What's the difference between “tale” and “fiction”? [on hold]

I'm learning English and reading a 504 book. I arrive to fiction word, and I observed no difference between fiction and tale. Are they synonyms? The Longman Dictionary says for tale: a story ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Assume vs make assumptions

Is there any difference in the level of formality, frequency of usage, etc? Example sentences: Never assume anything. Never make any assumptions.
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Meaning of “Students in all majors” versus “Students of all majors”

I would like to know the difference between these sentences: I want to send an email to students of all majors I want to send an email to students in all majors How did of/in change the meaning of ...
3
votes
3answers
18k views

Is the tense called “Present Progressive” or “Present Continuous”?

What is the correct term used to describe this tense in English — Present Progressive or Present Continuous? I see both terms used in grammar books.
6
votes
2answers
18k views

Difference between “greater” and “larger”

What is the difference between greater and larger? For example, should we say for time, the waiting time is greater than or the waiting time is larger than?
1
vote
2answers
910 views

The difference between “past continuous” and “present perfect continuous”

Let's consider the following context: You come to the office on Saturday and see somebody finish some actions and now (s)he is sitting at your workplace (you didn't expect to meet anyone), ...
7
votes
2answers
834 views

Foul language vs. vulgar language [closed]

I have been able to find the differences between many pairs of words/phrases of similar meaning on Stack Exchange except for one — vulgar language and foul language. Could anyone shed some light on ...
-2
votes
1answer
27 views

concentrate and accumulate [on hold]

At http://loe.org/shows/shows.html?programID=03-P13-00018 I saw For example, samples of seawater will be filtered and concentrated. I wonder the difference between "concentrate" and ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

What is the meaning of this sentence “We got on the bus downtown”

Which one is correct? We were going downtown by the bus. We got on the bus when we were there (downtown).
3
votes
4answers
12k views

Differences among point, grade and mark

I do not know how they are different when they are used as a grading system ? Can I say a pointing system or a marking system?
1
vote
1answer
48 views

“impairment” vs. “impediment” (and derivatives)

Today I wrote the phrase "free from any procedural impediments" and am wondering how the meaning would change if I instead wrote "free from any procedural impairments." What is the difference ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

What's the difference between “slap-up meal” and “gourmet meal”?

The following quote comes from a collocation book for ESL purposes. I can see it's trying to teach us about the usage of different expressions to describe different kinds of meals. "Whether you want ...
2
votes
4answers
15k views

Difference between “synopsis” and “plot”

After commenting on this question, I started wondering what the difference between a plot and a synopsis is, or if they are exactly the same. I'm mainly looking for common usage, but anything else ...
3
votes
1answer
117 views

Difference in the usage? ; It “can / could / must” be something serious

I'm teaching English in Japan. I'm using "Grammar In Use Intermediate Workbook" (Cambridge). The following is the question in the workbook: Complete the sentence. Use can, could, must or (be) ...
4
votes
6answers
26k views

Difference between “taxi” and “cab”

Definition of taxi: To ride or travel in a taxicab Definition of cab: A taxicab. Since the definitions don't show many differences, is it okay to assume that there is no difference ...
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vote
2answers
2k views

“No less than” vs. “None less than”

Is the expression none less than similar to the idiom no less than? Which form is preferable to use in the following example: None less than the country's president attended today's meeting. OR ...
9
votes
7answers
3k views

Simple sentences that demonstrate differences among similar-looking words [closed]

While searching online for the difference between "sometime" and "some time", I stumbled upon this page. At the middle of the page you can see these two sentences that demonstrate the difference: ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

What is the difference between “regardless” and “irrelevant”? [closed]

They are both adjective that mean not relating to something. Are the terms interchangeable?
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Difference between 'holdings' and 'estates'

I am reading a table related to production of rubber; the title of the table is Productions By Holdings And Estates. In this context, what is the difference between holdings and estates?
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Differences between “vulgar” and “coarse”, “crass”, “crude”, “rough”, “rude”, “unrefined” as applied to language

This question specifically covers how these terms are used to describe language, it is a followup to What's the difference between "informal", "colloquial", "slang", ...
0
votes
1answer
10k views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Is “plurality” a valid word, and if so, what's the difference between it and “pluralisation”?

When I saw the word "plurality" being used in a grammar context, I thought they were getting mixed up with election related terminology - winning more votes than anyone else, but not getting a ...
2
votes
3answers
291 views

“got engaged” vs. “became engaged”

On the one hand, During the course of the summer, Esther got engaged. sounds weak and informal. On the other hand, During the course of the summer, Esther became engaged. sounds weird, ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

How about Sunday vs How about on Sunday?

"How about" are followed by nouns, clauses or Verb+ing. But is it grammatically correct to say "How about on Sunday?" I got more results Googling "How about on Sunday?" than "How about Sunday?" Which ...
3
votes
5answers
10k views

Difference between “larder” and “pantry”

What is the difference between larder and pantry? Is it size? Or content? I found very similar definitions for both terms, something like a room/place in which food is stored. Which of the ...
8
votes
2answers
11k views

What's the practical difference between “allot” and “allocate”?

I've noticed allot is usually used as an adjective (as in, "your allotted amount"), and allocate is more often used as a verb (as in, "I will allocate some resources"). Any other notable differences?
1
vote
1answer
45 views

What's the difference between strive and struggle

According to the Macmillan dictionary, strive is to make a lot of effort to achieve sth; and struggle to try hard to do sth that is very difficult. I would like to know the grammatic and semantic ...
2
votes
6answers
8k views

What is the difference between trash, garbage, litter, rubbish, waste?

Could somebody please explain the differences in usage of those words? The only difference I could find is that garbage and trash is AmE, rubbish BrE and litter / waste seem to be used in BrE and AmE. ...
1
vote
3answers
77 views

“match” vs "fill' dimensions of a 2D object

Question I apparently misunderstand the use of "fill" and "match" as used in the situations described in the context below. I take "fill" to mean "taking up the empty internal volume of something, ...
0
votes
1answer
140 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
4
votes
0answers
322 views

the difference between taunt and ridicule [migrated]

which one of these words is used as everyday English as well as means to despise someone and make fun of him for example because of his shape or Social status and so on
2
votes
1answer
31 views

has to do with vs has something to do with

What's the difference between the meanings of these two sentences? My homework has to do with last week's activity. My homework has something to do with last week's activity.
1
vote
1answer
17 views

any other vs other [closed]

What's the difference between the two sentences? I need any other books that I can replace with this. I need other books that I can replace with this.
13
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is “a couple of <things>” often shortened to “a couple <things>”?

I would write a couple of . I often read/hear a couple . I assumed this was an American English thing (I'm British), and just a convenient shortening of the phrase for speaking. It's easier to say a ...
10
votes
6answers
30k views

Difference in “capable” and “able”

What is the difference in being physically capable and physically able? When would one choose one over the other?
9
votes
5answers
26k views

What's the difference between a graph, a chart, and a plot?

A graph, a chart, and a plot can all refer to the same thing. Is there any even somewhat consistent distinction in these three words? (I mean, in this particular sense of the words; it is not ...
2
votes
2answers
30 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...