This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
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1answer
27 views

Do “I saw a dream” and “I had a dream” meant the same thing?

Which of these two is more appropriate: I saw a dream. I had a dream. Is there any difference between them?
-1
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0answers
19 views

relation vs. relations

I've noticed that relation is used alternatively in the singular and in the plural; thus, there is a similar number of scholarly papers on "ways to conceptualize the relation" between two phenomena, ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

“Have you washed it” vs “Did you wash it”? [duplicate]

What's the difference between these two questions? Speaker A: Your car looks very clean. Have you washed it? Did you wash it?
30
votes
5answers
166k views
+50

What's the difference between using single and double quotation marks/inverted commas?

I'm quite unsure regarding the usage of single quotation marks (') and double quotation marks (") in English. I had thought that double quotation marks were usually used to quote sentences from ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

Can there be one “Co-Founder”?

Assuming there is a company that was founded by two people (A and B), one of them is also the CEO (A). Is it correct to say that A is the founder and B is the (only) co-founder? Or does co-founder ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

“Ontology” vs. “ontography”

I have yet to find a good description of the difference between ontology and ontography. Can anyone help clarify?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“See these guys [infinitive]” vs. “see these guys [present participle]”

Which is correct: I am excited to see these guys growing up. or I am excited to see these guys grow up. Having hard time figuring out how to use gerunds in a sentence.
1
vote
1answer
300 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
3
votes
1answer
45 views

Difference between “compact” and “accord”

What's the difference between those two words? But the Marshall Islands holds an important card: Under a 1986 compact, the roughly 70,000 residents of the Marshalls The debate over loss and ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What is the difference between 'tube' and 'tubing' in technical writing?

I write technical documentation. Our products include fluid conduits. People call them tubes, tubing, hoses, lines. When would the word tube be insufficient and tubing be required?
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Other than - except for

Yesterday I used the sentence: "I know people except (for) you." and I have been told that the correct version is: "I know people other than you." Although I have been looking at related ...
6
votes
3answers
5k views

“Kernel” vs. “core”

What's the difference between kernel and core? The more I look for a difference between both, the more confused I get. I know both nouns because of IT, but I'm looking for the actual roots in actual ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Usage of “cowardly” and “coward”

I recently discovered that cowardly, which looks like an adverb, is actually also an adjective. So far so good. Then what is the difference between cowardly and coward, and is there any preferential ...
6
votes
2answers
6k views

What words can I use to describe trends in graphs for the IELTS exam (e.g. “increase”, “growth”)? [closed]

What is the difference between increase, growth, go up and rise? And what is the difference between decline, fall, go down and drop? I really don't know which is the best to describe parts of a graph. ...
1
vote
3answers
59 views

Usage of “won't” instead of “didn't” in particular way of communication

I'm a bit confused about the usage of the word "won't" in a specific situation. For example, I am communicating with a person and I want to tell the person that How much ever I tried, the image ...
5
votes
5answers
38k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
1
vote
3answers
51 views

“match” vs "fill' dimensions of a 2D object

Question I apparently misunderstand the use of "fill" and "match" as used in the situations described in the context below. I take "fill" to mean "taking up the empty internal volume of something, ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Are these two sentences in the passive form correct?

I have two sentences and I would like to know whether both are correct or one of them should be preferred over the other: The availability of sensors in many applications necessitates that the ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

x-stor(e)y or x-floor or x-level house/building?

Which is the correct for British English? I need the correct for both a separate house and an apartment building, if this makes difference. I can't find any concrete answer online.
0
votes
2answers
58 views

What is the difference between “I don't know” and “I wouldn't know”? [on hold]

I have seen both these sentences used but don't see any obvious difference. Could you please explain in what situations one is preferable to the other.
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Names of properties [on hold]

I have the entity (abstraction) Coupon. The coupon can be selected several times and used. I need to record how many times the Coupon has been selected and used. Please help to choose the names ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Old or older people

Which is grammatically correct? Old people are often lonely. Or Older people are often lonely. I understand context matters. I just want to know when it is right to use one or the other.
0
votes
0answers
17 views

more Vs much. where we use with 'more' and 'much' [on hold]

which is correct 'more polluted city' OR 'much polluted city'. and where we use with 'more' and 'much'.
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Is there a connection between the words “illicit” and “elicit”?

The words "illicit" and "elicit" seem to be spelled and pronounced similarly, although their meanings appear different. Is this a coincidence or is there a connection between the two words?
19
votes
5answers
7k views

Usage of “many” vs “many a”?

Can someone please elucidate the difference between "many" and "many a"? In what context of usage should we add an extra "a" beside the word "many"? For example: Many times, I had seen that . ...
9
votes
2answers
13k views

Differences between “technic” and “technique”

Are those synonyms? Is one more acceptable in a certain dialect than the other? I checked their definition on The Free Dictionary but it's still not clear to me.
1
vote
5answers
18k views

What is the difference between “clearance” and “sale”?

I want to understand the difference between clearance and sale. So are these words synonyms or not? E.g. Receive 60–90% off CookiesKids Clearance from Cookie's Kids. Receive 50–85% off After ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

Difference between “Introduction” and “Background summary” in report writing

I have a task to do: writing a report. This one needs to be 4 pages as directed by the assigner. I was told to write 1/4, 3/4, 2 and 1/4 pages of Introduction, Background Summary, Discussion and ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

What is the difference between “To finish something” and “To end something”

What is the difference between "To finish something" and "To end something" When do people say end and when do people say finish ?
6
votes
2answers
5k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
6
votes
1answer
78 views

What is the difference between “emoji” and “emoticon”? [closed]

I have seen these two words used to describe :) or 😀. Are they different in any way? How could I tell when to use one or another? I have also done research on Google to no avail.
9
votes
4answers
28k views

“was able to” vs “could”

According to my grammar book, here are some usages of was able to and could could can be used to refer in general that someone has a skill. e.g. At that time I could still read without spectacles. ...
3
votes
3answers
33k views

“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Difference in Syllabus and Curriculum

In a book in Bengali, below the title of the book they had written "Prak-Prathamik Pathyakram-pathyesuchi". The "word-to-word" meaning of it is following (found in a dictionary): ...
8
votes
4answers
5k views

Is there a difference between “continual” and “continuous”?

They are very close in meaning, I know, but I want to know if there are any subtle differences. Let me give you an example of a subtle difference in meaning between synonyms: Deceitful vs. ...
0
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0answers
24 views

Difference between meaning of abstain and refrain [closed]

What are the basic differences between abstain and refrain? Do both words serve the same purpose or not?
1
vote
1answer
352 views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Is there a difference between “on condition that” and “provided that”?

Do the terms "provided that" and "on condition that" mean the same? Or is there any difference in usage? The means will be available provided that the state will allocate its part of financing vs. ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Meaning of “Students in all majors” versus “Students of all majors”

I would like to know the difference between these sentences: I want to send an email to students of all majors I want to send an email to students in all majors How did of/in change the meaning of ...
-3
votes
1answer
35 views

What is the different between “nature” and “natural”? [closed]

I want to ask how to distinguish 'nature' and 'natural'. Additionally, how to use them in a correctly way when they are combined with another noun to make a noun phrase, please give me some examples ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

What is difference between editor and redactor?

English is not my native language, so may be I overlooked something obvious? I seen in few places that "editor" and "redactor" in context of magazine or newspaper are not the same, but can't find a ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

What's the difference of “will be need” and “will need” [closed]

I usually use "We will need this formula in ..." in my scientific writing, while someone ask me to change it to "We will be need this formula in ...". My question: Is the usage "will be need" ...
1
vote
2answers
869 views

The difference between “past continuous” and “present perfect continuous”

Let's consider the following context: You come to the office on Saturday and see somebody finish some actions and now (s)he is sitting at your workplace (you didn't expect to meet anyone), ...
1
vote
4answers
81 views

What is the difference between “perpetrator” and “transgressor”? [closed]

I don't quite understand when one might be applied, but not the other. Also, is anyone who committed a transgression a transgressor, or might they also be perpetrators? Does it make a difference? ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Peevish, crabby, irritable, and bad-tempered [closed]

What's the difference between them? What the difference between someone who is peevish or irritable and a ‘crabby person’? As far as I get them Peevish — easily annoyed, especially by things that ...
3
votes
2answers
212 views

Difference between 'melancholic' and adjective 'melancholy'?

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives melancholy and melancholic? Can they be used interchangeably? The Oxford Learner's Dictionaries define them as follows: melancholy ...
2
votes
2answers
81 views

What is the difference between rite and ritual? [closed]

I have found the word rite or ritual used separately and have also found written together like "rite and ritual". But, what are differences between them. If they are related to religions, Give me ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Semantics of 'the extent which' vs 'the extent TO which'

'the extent which'    vs    2. 'the extent to which' : 3. Semantically, how do these compare? I know that to is a preposition and so a Functional Morpheme, but does 'to' affect anything ...
0
votes
3answers
8k views

What is the difference between “around” and “round”?

When I am writing I often come across the words "around" and "round." I was wondering what is different between them, and how they would be used in different contexts.
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“Field of study” vs. “subject of study”

What is the difference between field and subject and what is the discipline here?