This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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6
votes
5answers
13k views

What is the difference between “to oblige” and “to obligate”?

What's the difference between oblige and obligate? Speculating, is the latter an Americanism of the British former? Or is there any distinction about what/who has caused someone to be oblig(at)ed to ...
0
votes
2answers
99 views

What is the difference between “could not get to” and “did not get to”?

Take, for example, this sentence: Away from Vatican City, Tome was quiet as authorities ordered all public offices and schools to close (close), and banned (ban) cars from the roads. Millions of ...
11
votes
1answer
14k views

“Dependence” vs. “dependency”

These are two words that have baffled me for long. Dependency is given as 'excessive dependence' in Chambers, but I would love to know how the spoken usage is. My guess is dependency has a political ...
2
votes
2answers
441 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
-4
votes
0answers
35 views

What is different between look, see and watch [migrated]

I have confusion about following words because it's Gujarati meaning for all are same. What is actual difference between following words Look, See, Watch If possible then explain with example.
5
votes
6answers
10k views

“Ineffectual” vs “ineffective”

Skeptics argue that these kinds of initiatives are doomed to remain perennially peripheral and ineffectual. Intuitively, changing ineffectual to ineffective in the sentence above seems to ...
1
vote
3answers
112k views

What is the difference between 'curricula' and 'curriculum'?

What is the difference between 'curricula' and 'curriculum'? Both appear to have the same definition. Are they used in the same context?
3
votes
2answers
66 views

What's the difference between a House and a Dynasty?

Why is it called "House of Plantagenet" or "House of Lancaster", instead of "Dynasty of Plantagenet" or "Dynasty of Lancaster"? What's the difference between house and dynasty?
1
vote
4answers
69 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
3
votes
2answers
414 views

Connotations: “sanguine” vs “sanguinary”

I broadened this question after encountering sanguinary. 1. sanguine: optimistic or positive, especially in an apparently bad or difficult situation: 2. sanguinary {archaic}: involving ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Grandmother / Grandma

I have a question. Is it normal(common) for about 30-year-old man to call his grandmother 'grandma'? Doesn't he sound like a kid if using 'grandma'? Please help me! Thank you in advance.
8
votes
7answers
8k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
5
votes
2answers
56 views

Difference between defray, sponsor, and fund?

What is the difference between defray, sponsor, and fund (all verbs)? For me, they are interchangeable: Oxford Dictionary: Defray: Provide money to pay (a cost or expense) The proceeds ...
-1
votes
3answers
525 views

Words that change meaning when a letter is added/removed/changed

Want to know if there is a collective word to describe these kind of words that change their meanings in an opposite way (rather than irrelevantly) when a single letter is added/removed/changed so ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Room ahead” vs “Head room”

Consider the following sentences: I'm not sure if I still have some room ahead. And: I'm not sure if I still have some head room. Besides being shorter, and the order of words, what is the ...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Meaning and use of “would have to be” in this sentence

I'm a beginner of English and really appreciate that you can help me learn more. I noticed a sentence: I think all the girls in the anime are awesome, but my favorites would have to be Nozomi and ...
-1
votes
3answers
41 views

presenter vs speaker

I am organizing a seminar but i wonder how to address the person who presents the presentation in that seminar. presenter or speaker? What is difference between presenter and speaker? Are they ...
1
vote
4answers
102 views

“dead brother's grandson” VS “passed-away brother's grandson”

One is dead brother's grandson (and) dead sister's grandson. The other is passed-away brother's grandson (and) passed-away sister's grandson. They come from part of a novel which I'm ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

“Do not rely” on something, does rely focus on never using “something”?

So, I was talking with a friend of mine a little while back about what "relying" on something means. His take was that to "rely" on something was to completely depend on the "something", as in only ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Difference between Co-curricular activities and Extra-curricular activities and Hobby [closed]

What is the difference between these fields in a resume primarily Co-curricular activities and Extra-curricular activities ; Extra-curricular activities and Hobby. I wan to know The meaning and usage ...
6
votes
5answers
12k views

“Most important” vs “most importantly”

I was always under impression that "most important" is correct usage when going through the list of things. We need to pack socks, toothbrushes for the trip, but most important is to pack ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views
0
votes
2answers
225 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

difference in meaning depending on placement of “already” [duplicate]

Maybe the bus already left. Maybe the bus has already left. Maybe the bus has left already. I am not a native speaker so don't know if there is any difference among those three sentences, not ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Difference between 'have to' and 'will have to' [closed]

Is there any difference between these two statements. If yes could you tell me when to use them. I have to do that I will have to do that
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Why do people say “Cut and paste” instead of “Copy and paste”?

I often see "cut and paste" used over "copy and paste" in the context of computers and word processing. I also see "cut and paste" and CTRL-C+CTRL-V used interchangeably when CTRL-X is the actual ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “pliable” and “pliant”?

I am confused between pliable and pliant. What's the difference? The explanation in the Oxford Dictionary seems vague: pliable 1. easily bent; flexible [quality leather is ...
-1
votes
2answers
108 views

… to feel sick Tuesday afternoon / on Tuesday afternoon / from Tuesday afternoon. Which one is correct?

Are these all correct? He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick on Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling ...
1
vote
3answers
10k views

Should I use “arrived” or “reached”

Sometimes when I come back from my brother's house he asks me to let him know when I am at home. Now, in that situation which one of the following is correct : I've reached home now. OR I've ...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

How can 'for' be classed as a Co-ordinating conjunction in the following instances?

I cannot give you any money, for I have none. He deserved to succeed, for he worked hard. Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. In the above sentences, 'for' can easily be replaced ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

What are the differences between “impolite” and “unpolite”?

Definition of impolite in OD: not having or showing good manners; rude. Definition of unpolite in TFD: Not polite; impolite; rude.
11
votes
6answers
10k views

What is the difference between “citizen” and “denizen”

Citizen: 1. A legally recognized subject ornational of a state or commonwealth, either native or naturalized. 2. An inhabitant of a particular town or city. Denizen: 1. An inhabitant or occupant of a ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Difference between “needed” and “necessary”

What is the difference between those two words? Example sentence: "this can greatly reduce the needed | necessary effort". I found some posts saying that necessary is more urgent?! Are there more ...
3
votes
3answers
9k views

Difference between 'just' and 'only'

'Just' and 'only' carry a similar meaning, and while my feel for language usually helps me decide which one to use, there are times when I'm at a loss. From my understanding, 'just' is used as a ...
53
votes
15answers
18k views

When to use “nude” and when “naked”

The question is quite clear. Is there any difference (semantically or connotationally, if that's a word) between nude and naked? Nude seems more formal to me, but I'm not quite sure. Interesting: ...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

“The man in glasses” or “The man with glasses”? [closed]

The man in glasses or The man with glasses Is it grammatically correct to say with or in glasses? I've heard both, but the first seems to prevail a little bit more, though. Googling ...
-1
votes
0answers
23 views

'albeit that' vs 'albeit [it were the case] that'

I was trying to determine the meaning of albeit that, while reading the first textual para on p 5 of 16 of this PDF written by Dr Peter Williams. Then Google revealed p 116, Complete manual of ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

If you have/had/did not + verb + yet [duplicate]

What is the correct sentence(s) in those : 1 If you haven't read this yet, I recommend doing it. 2 If you had not read this yet, I recommend doing it. 3 If you didn't read this yet, ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
4
votes
1answer
431 views

Difference between promptness and promptitude

Seeing this EL&U question: 'saying thanks to someone answering your email ASAP who is important for you', the first word that came to my mind was promptitude which, as the definition states, can ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Difference between near, nearby and close

Could you tell me a ( near - nearby - close ) pharmacy? I live ( near - nearby - close ) to the bank. Don't leave. I'm (near - nearby - close ). Do you think that they ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
-2
votes
2answers
465 views

Is there a technical term for what creationists call “macroevolution”?

The term macroevolution is often abused (see the section "Misuse" in the Wikipedia article) by creationists who are referencing the Biblical concept of immutable "kinds" of animals. Is there a word ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Difference between “convert” and “transform”

In the dictionary, the words "convert" and "transform" both have the meaning of changing the form of something. So how should I distinguish them? In what situation they are of the same meaning, and in ...
0
votes
2answers
168 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

University vs college vs academy vs institute vs community college [closed]

What is the difference between University vs college vs academy vs institute vs community college? What are degrees people can get (in order)? What are the other type of schools? (e.g primary ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Difference between control and manage?

They seem to function the same. Manage is even "control in action or use" according to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/manage. Control is a verb so isn't that in action as well? Thus, is it the ...
3
votes
5answers
461 views

“Authoring” versus “Writing”

In my area of work the word author as a verb has become quite common. However, it seems to have a subtly different meaning than plain vanilla write. For example, one does not write software unit ...