This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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5
votes
2answers
4k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
1
vote
2answers
25 views

Difference between Approximate and Proximate?

So I searched and a few questions that mention variations of this word but none that asked what the difference was? I have heard: Approximate & Proximate Approximately & Proximity But ...
6
votes
4answers
16k views

“Homeland” vs. “motherland” vs. “fatherland”

What is the distinction between homeland, motherland and fatherland? Is there any difference in meaning of such terms? When it comes to connotations are there any differences, except for the ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

What's the difference between tethering and hitching an animal?

Hitching, tethering, picketing, or securing any pack or saddle stock within 200 feet slope distance of any permanent lake, stream, spring, pond. or shelter. Doesn't both mean tying an animal to a ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

Difference between “irascible”, “fractious”, “irritable” and “atrabilious”?

It seems that they can all mean "easily provoked to anger" irascible:Easily provoked to outbursts of anger; irritable. fractious:Irritable; argumentative; quarrelsome. irritable:1.Capable of being ...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

Difference between “place” and “position”

Can these words be used interchangeably when referring to a point in the world?
9
votes
5answers
32k views

“Most important” vs “most importantly”

I was always under impression that "most important" is correct usage when going through the list of things. We need to pack socks, toothbrushes for the trip, but most important is to pack ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
3
votes
6answers
6k views

What is the difference between “attribute” and “property”? [on hold]

Could you please clear up the meaning of these two words for me? I don't understand this sentence: Attributes introduced by RDFA have names. For example, property is one such attribute.
1
vote
2answers
96 views

“I never was” vs. “I was never”

What is the difference between "I never was" and "I was never"? It seems that there is a subtle difference, but I can't quite grasp it. Is one of them informal? For example: I never was a good ...
5
votes
4answers
10k views

Difference between get “off of” and “off”

What is the difference when you say "get off of something" and "get off something"?
0
votes
1answer
17k views

“Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”

English is not my mother tongue. I once came across information that listening to music and listening to the music mean something different. Listening to the music would mean you put whole heart into ...
0
votes
2answers
515 views

'such as something' vs. 'such something as'

The original one: 1. From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

What is the diferrence between “minute by minute” and “minute after minute”

I am not a native speaker therefore I would be grateful if someone could explain me what is the diferrence between "minute by minute" and "minute after minute". Thank you.
5
votes
6answers
9k views

“Important” and “significant”

"Important" and "significant" seems to be very close in meaning when denoting that something matters much. But am I right in thinking that "important" is less formal word than "significant"? And ...
5
votes
3answers
6k views

“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
-4
votes
0answers
28 views

Difference between mass and weight [on hold]

What is the difference between "mass and weight" and when do we use the two?
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”

What's the difference between saying; Will you be going home this summer? Will you go home this summer? Are there any differences between these in written or spoken English?
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Differences between: “prior”, “ precede”, “predate”, “in advance” and “former”

I am struggling with the exact meanings of these words. In the dictionary they all seem to be connected to the idea of "previous". But I don't know which word I should use and in which context. ...
1
vote
2answers
326 views

Devoid vs Bereft

I am under the impression that few words have perfect synonyms that are interchangeable in all contexts considering their different connotations or literal meanings. Is there a difference between ...
2
votes
2answers
393 views

Is 'Mochup' the same as 'Mock-up'?

I recently came across the word 'mochup'. I am unsure if this is simply a spelling mistake of the term 'mock-up', or if it is a technical neologism with a slightly different meaning. Searching on ...
5
votes
3answers
13k views

What is the difference between “Hept-” and “Sept-” prefixes?

As I understand it, both the prefixes "Hept-" and "Sept-" are used to indicate seven of something. We have examples of English words that use both: e.g. Heptathalon, Heptagon, Heptane vs ...
-1
votes
0answers
40 views

The differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly

What are the differences between being crafty, cunning, conman and sly in terms of meaning and usage ?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “diary” and “calendar”

The difference between a paper diary and a paper calendar is fairly clear, though either may be used to record an appointmemt. However a computer application is less clear as, for example, MS ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Keep on discussing vs Keep on discussing it

We kept discussing. We kept discussing whether God exists. Is an object (in this case, God's existence) necessary in this sentence? For example, with writing, it seems that an object ...
0
votes
2answers
81 views

The difference between present continuous and present perfect continuous

Let's consider next case : You come to the office in Saturday, for example, and see that somebody finished some actions and now is sitting on your workplace (you didn't expect to meet anyone), but ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference in pronunciation between 'warship' and 'worship'?

I came across these words together in a text, and I was wondering whether they are pronounced the same way. 'War' is actually pronounced as 'wor', so I'm not entirely sure. When I pronounce them, I ...
28
votes
4answers
107k views

What's the difference between using single and double quotation marks/inverted commas?

I'm quite unsure regarding the usage of single quotation marks (') and double quotation marks (") in English. I had thought that double quotation marks were usually used to quote sentences from ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

Usage of “do not ” vs “does not” [closed]

I am trying to understand the grammar behind using "do not" vs "does not". Consider the following sentences. 1a. The way items are added to the cart does not guarantee an order. vs 1b. The way ...
2
votes
4answers
74 views

To raise/lower the blinds or to draw the blinds?

I'm an English learner and I'd like to know which verb should I use when using the word venetian blinds. Do you say 'to raise/lower the blinds' or 'to pull the blinds up/down?' or 'to draw the ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“Skim” vs “Scan”

I've looked up the words in a bunch of dictionaries and each one says something different. As I understand they're a kind of synonyms. I scanned the article for his name. - meaning, I read it ...
8
votes
5answers
20k views

Difference in “capable” and “able”

What is the difference in being physically capable and physically able? When would one choose one over the other?
1
vote
2answers
6k views

The right, concise way to indicate current enrollment in multiple specific master's degree programs

EDIT: I originally titled this "Master of Architecture student" or "Master of Architecture candidate"? My apologies if the question was unclear, I couldn't think of a better title at the time, I hope ...
13
votes
3answers
5k views

Usage of “many” vs “many a”?

Can someone please elucidate the difference between "many" and "many a"? In what context of usage should we add an extra "a" beside the word "many"? For example: Many times, I had seen that . ...
-2
votes
1answer
42 views

What does “illuminate” mean?

What is the meaning of illuminate regarding skin appearance? What is the difference between shiny or glowing in this context?
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Can we say “same to you” in response to “nice to meet you”?

Is it ok to respond with "same to you" when someone says Nice to meet you ? I am getting confused because "you too" can be interchangeably used for "same to you".
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Comical” v. “Comedic”

Is there any semantic distinction between the words comedic and comical? I usually use the former to describe people and the latter to describe things, situations, etc.
1
vote
1answer
51 views

What is the difference between “part” and “component”?

Can a part mean something that (along with other things) makes up a whole, apart from meaning a piece of something? Can then part always substitute component?
2
votes
3answers
67 views

Difference between judgement, opinion, and fact (with examples)

I recently got into a heated debate with my girlfriend regarding the differences between what one considers judgement, opinion, and fact. Where do you draw the line? The example I gave is- Judgement: ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Difference between 'derives from' and 'prompted by'

Let's imagine we have a task and this task has a child task. So what's the difference in relation between parent task and child task if the child task has status: Derives from Was prompted by ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Which future tense for holidays or doctor appointments?

Although I know the general rules when to apply which tense, I'm often confused and do not really know which one to use. I can find pros and cons for each tense. Two examples: In terms of spending ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “bush” and “shrub”?

What's the difference between "bush" and "shrub"? Are these absolute synonyms?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Writing one academic year to another academic year [closed]

I am a bit confused. When do we write 2014-2015 and when do we write 2014-15? Are the two the same? If yes, which is more formal?
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What is the difference between “keep on challenging” and “keep challenging”?

As I listened to the English radio, the DJ said "keep on challenging yourself". But I have known that we can also say that "keep challenging yourself". What is the role of "on" in the former ...
-7
votes
1answer
59 views

What are the differences between “genes” and “men” and “boys”? [closed]

What are the differences between genes and men and boys? Also, what is the difference between men and man?
7
votes
4answers
25k views

“I have no …” vs. “I don't have …”

I have no house. I don't have a house. What's the difference between the phrases like the ones above?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Riddance vs Freedom [closed]

Riddance translate as the "Freedom action" in Portuguese. What's their difference in english? From dictionary.com: Riddance: the act or fact of clearing away or out, as anything undesirable. Freedom: ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

What's the differences between “Is he taking part in the play?” and “Does he take part in the play?”

I want to know the differences between "Is he taking part in the play?" and "Does he take part in the play?" Are they both grammatically correct? Thanks.
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...