This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
votes
2answers
102 views

aberrant vs errant

Aberrant seems a subset of the word errant. Thus, what's the effect of the Latin prefix 'ab-'? What are the similarities and differences? What's this phenomenon called, in which a prefix or suffix ...
3
votes
3answers
442 views

What is the difference between “rate” and “grade”?

What is the difference between "rate" and "grade"? When I am awarding points 0-20 for a homework assignment, do I rate the homework or do I grade it? Or perhaps both are appropriate?
1
vote
1answer
159 views

Does the term 'noon' have exact meaning? [closed]

Say I have a meeting at 10:00 and want to postpone it to around 13:00, can I ask the other to "postpone it to noon, around 13:00"? Or the term 'noon' means exactly 12:00?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between “Mediary” and “Intermediary”?

I can't find a definition for Mediary, I thought they kind of mean the same thing. But how they each precisely defined? And can someone use a good example of both? Thanks
-2
votes
2answers
118 views

And/Or and Except/Only

I have the following sentence: Who am I? Picture James Bond, except without the British Accent. Or the six-pack. My question is about two words: except versus only; also, or versus and. Seems ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”? [closed]

Cats are carnivores Cats are carnivorous Cats are carnivorous animals I often hear people say those sentences and I wonder which among them is/are correct. And are there any differences in ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Difference between “everybody” and “everyone” [duplicate]

I would like to know the difference between these two words. Do they have a specific use?
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Usage clarification of nouns format and formatting

How do the following two sentences differ in meaning? Ensure the formatting of the text Ensure the format of the text
1
vote
3answers
88 views

Is he “making a play” for her or is he “making a pass” at her?

to make a play for someone - to attempt to attract the romantic interest of someone. to make a pass at someone - to make a romantic advance at someone. To a non-native speaker, the ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Difference between tune and adjust (in case of 'parameter')

I was wondering if there is a difference between tuning a parameter and adjusting a parameter. Could there be a slight difference among them?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Would anybody please tell me what is the difference between object and goal? [closed]

Would anybody please tell me what is the difference between object and goal? I have long been facing with these words, most often being used together, especially in introductions. I am wondering ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between interaction, communication, conversation, and discussion? [closed]

I think all of these are kinds of communication. But can't think the difference between the other terms
1
vote
2answers
148 views

Are “bear someone out” and “back someone up” sometimes interchangeable?

Back up - v.tr - to support Bear out - v.tr - to prove right or justified, confirm, corroborate. In the following sentences, are "bear someone out" and "back someone up" perfectly ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Differences: “in some recent years” vs “in recent years” [closed]

I can't distinguish the differences. When(how) to use them, and context?
2
votes
3answers
360 views

When if means iff and if, respectively? [duplicate]

It seems sometimes 'if' really means 'if and only if' (abbreviated as iff), and sometimes 'if but not necessarily only if'. Is there a better usage with 'if' than the regular/default way? Should I ...
-2
votes
1answer
41 views

Are these 2 sentences same. minor different, moderately different substantially different or completely different

1 (.plant if Syria obtained a nuclear power reactor and needed fresh fuel...) or2.(plant if Syria obtained a nuclear capacity reactor and needed fresh fuel..).
6
votes
2answers
208 views

Apart from the intensity of the feeling, is there any other difference between “surprised” and “astonished”?

EDITED Surprise (verb) Cause (someone) to feel mild astonishment or shock. Capture, attack, or discover suddenly and unexpectedly. ...
4
votes
1answer
479 views

Difference between promptness and promptitude

Seeing this EL&U question: 'saying thanks to someone answering your email ASAP who is important for you', the first word that came to my mind was promptitude which, as the definition states, can ...
0
votes
2answers
242 views

Do these sentences mean the same thing?

Do these sentences all mean the same thing? You are not great because you know many things. You are great not because you know many things. You are great for another reason. As another example, ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Difference between audience and audiences? [closed]

I've heard some people say the word audiences in conversation. How does audiences differ from audience and when do you use it?
0
votes
0answers
92 views

What is the difference between “matter-containing media” and “matter”?

I'm reading the english wikipedia entry titled "Radiation". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation you can find the word in the first paragraph, or by searching. so... What is the difference between ...
0
votes
2answers
482 views

Availability to meet vs availability to meeting?

I'm writing a thank you email to thank a person for finding the time to meet with me. Which of the following two forms is correct, and why? I wanted to thank you again for your availability to meet ...
3
votes
2answers
248 views

what´s the difference between I don´t mind and I don´t care [duplicate]

I am looking for the difference meaning between 'I don´t care' and 'I don´t mind' Thank you
0
votes
2answers
131 views

Is there difference in common usage between 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' sentences

In common everyday usage is there any diffrence between these sentences: 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' My clue: Ad 1. I have some proposition of an answer but I'm not 100% sure Ad 2. ...
26
votes
5answers
13k views

Difference between “I am really sorry” and “I really am sorry”

I know they are slightly different, but I can't tell how. I've read about the usage of the word "really" in a negative sentence. But it didn't tell me about how the position of the word "really" can ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
5
votes
1answer
210 views

“Hypocorism”/“hypocoristic” vs. “diminutive”

I ran across the word hypocoristic for the first time today, in an article on gender in languages and its relationship to sex: In several of these dialects, nouns denoting girls and unmarried ...
4
votes
1answer
6k views

Difference between 'oxymoron', 'paradox', 'contradiction' and 'misnomer' [closed]

What is the difference between the words oxymoron, paradox, contradiction and misnomer? For example, Benevolent dictator is an oxymoron. If I replace oxymoron with misnomer, paradox, or ...
0
votes
0answers
124 views

When to use a singular verb for multiple subjects separated with 'and'? [duplicate]

I tried http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm and the following, but remain mystified, so this doesn't duplicate. 1. http://english.stackexchange.com/a/13333/50720 2. "Are" vs. ...
2
votes
1answer
872 views

what is the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust [closed]

I looked at dictionary but i couldn't understand the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust with simple examples please
0
votes
1answer
378 views

Exploration “on” or “of”

As already written in the title, I need help on how to write the following: A exploration on Levy alpha-stable distributions or A exploration of Levy alpha-stable distributions In an ...
0
votes
1answer
853 views

Difference between “implementing” and “executing”?

I would appreciate it if you could explain to me the difference between implementing and executing. Here is an example: "The implementing agency(ies) for this project is UNEP and the national ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Is addendum synonymous to supplement?

What's the difference between addendum and supplement? The way I see it they both mean pretty much the same thing. It's something added to something else to complete it. I think supplement can be used ...
4
votes
6answers
760 views

Difference between “would have + past participle” and “would + bare infinitive” in the main clause of a past subjunctive sentence

I'm wondering about the difference in meaning, if any, between the two sentences in each of the following examples. Example 1. a. If he was a serious leader, tackling the debt would have been a ...
0
votes
1answer
171 views

“She always sees…” or “She is always seeing…”

She always sees things that don't exist. She is always seeing things that don't exist. In the first sentence we use verb "to see" in the present simple tense. In the second sentence, verb ...
0
votes
1answer
517 views

“In no way” vs “By no means”

How do I decide whether I should use "in no way" or "by no means"? Are they different in any way? Should either of these terms be used at all? For example: In no way am I suggesting that... ...
2
votes
2answers
503 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“I'm sorry for” vs. “I'm sorry about”

Can I use about and for interchangeably? If not, when should I use either? Which is more common? I'm sorry for/about yesterday. I'm sorry for/about my bad English. I'm sorry for/about that. ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

What is the difference between Anglia and England?

What is the difference between Anglia and England? When it's used. Some examples of modern usages: probably coincident, but Anglia in Polish language is England, there are regions called East ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

How do you call a thing that raises something (e.g. an event)?

Let's say I want to describe event model in some software. Conceptually there are two sides: the one which raises an event and another which receives it. While I do know the difference between to ...
1
vote
3answers
132 views

“Her water broke” or “Her waters broke”

Which is more correct: "Her water broke." or "Her waters broke." I've been searching online and I've found uses of both "water" and "waters" in various places, but none of them very authoritative. I ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Unavailable” vs. “not available” [duplicate]

What is the difference between unavailable and not available? In my opinion, unavailable is something that will never be available, while not available is something that is not available right now ...
0
votes
1answer
362 views

“small room” vs. “little room” / “big room” vs. “large room”

I never had problems with small and little before. However, I only had known about a small room before I saw the word a little room in a textbook (Family and Friends by Naomi Simmons). Is it the ...
1
vote
4answers
550 views

Difference between “exercise” and “workout”

We can say: I will do exercise today or I will do workout today. Is there any difference between them?
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“Birthday” vs. “anniversary”

Are there general guidelines for using "anniversary" vs. "birthday"? E.g., birthdays are generally for... well, birthdays. It's also used for some notable historical dates regarding countries ("Our ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Could not have been” vs. “must not have been”

What's the difference between "could not have been" and "must not have been"? For example, That could not have been an easy task. That must not have been an easy task. I've seen both ...
2
votes
2answers
226 views

Difference between elucidate and explicate

I read the definitions of these two terms rendered by various dictionaries and concluded that elucidate denotes 'to make perspicuous or intelligible (especially by explanation)'; whereas, explicate ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Differences between begin and start? How to use them? [duplicate]

I would like to know when to use begin and when to use start. They have same meaning,so it is hard to ditinguish them.
-2
votes
2answers
64 views

Difference between distinctness and distinction [closed]

I want to say "the clear distinctness/distinction of the two formulas implies ...". Please could you tell me how to select the word?