This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
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2answers
113 views

Difference between “repress” and “quell” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between repress and quell? Are they interchangeable?
0
votes
1answer
82 views

“Despising look” vs “despised look”

Peter gave me a despising look. Peter gave me a despised look. Are the two statements above the same? My understanding is that in statement 1, I may have done something that Peter thinks ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Interdependence vs. interdependency: grammatical number

Are the two words interchangeable? If so, why is one more common in singular (interdependence) and the other in plural (interdependencies)? Look at the Google search hit numbers below: ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

The precursor and the predecessor. What's the difference? [closed]

Wherefor does this section called 'body' must have been filled out by the 30 words? it should help people to perceive the simple questions like this a bit better? -there's close to 30 words. at any ...
1
vote
4answers
232 views

What's the difference between “title” and “name”?

I'm not sure when it's appropriate to use word "name", and when to use word "title". For example, "file name" feels right, "file title" doesn't; "document name" and "document title" seem ...
1
vote
1answer
160 views

Difference between speculation and guessing [closed]

The background to this question is in the comments below this answer on Sci-Fi. Is there a difference between "speculating" and "guessing"? My understanding is that they are pretty interchangeable ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Difference between “magnitude” and “extent”

Is there a difference between the two when used as in the following sentences? The extent of the disaster was initially underestimated. vs. The magnitude of the disaster was initially ...
2
votes
1answer
491 views

Mixed conditional clause type 1-3

I came across the following conditional clause while studying a grammar book published by Oxford: "If you know London so well, you shouldn't have got so hopelessly lost." The writer of the book has ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
0
votes
3answers
142 views

Difference in meaning between “booking is amended” and “booking has been amended” [duplicate]

What is the difference in meaning between "booking is amended" and "booking has been amended"?
1
vote
3answers
576 views

Difference between “wedding” and “marriage”

What is the correct usage between the following? A wedding anniversary A marriage anniversary? What differences are there, if any.
0
votes
4answers
158 views

“former” vs “last” as in “my former, only and last husband”

I was reading a book and found this expression: [...] my former, only and last husband. Could anyone tell me what are the differences between former and last in this case? Also, would former and ...
-1
votes
2answers
127 views

'Marked by' vs 'having' in dictionary definitions

I've read definitions that differ from each other only by the words marked by and having. E.g. 'Marked by a calm demeanor' and 'having a calm demeanor'. I see this often enough that I suspect ...
3
votes
1answer
502 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Simple present or present perfect simple with “WHEN”?

From a native speaker's point of view, are these sentences both gramatically acceptable and equally common in spoken/written English? I'll call you when I get to the gym. I'll call you when I've got ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

“I am from” vs. “I am with”

I want to say that I work for Company A or represent it. I see 2 ways to express this: I am from Company A I am with Company A Which way is correct one? What are other ways to say it? ...
-5
votes
2answers
113 views

What's the difference between “known as” and “known for”? [closed]

Above the title. What's the difference between "known as" and "known for"?
-1
votes
1answer
113 views

Disinterested vs. uninterested

I’ve always understood the difference between disinterested and uninterested as follows: uninterested: not interested, not up to it disinterested: impartial Consider the situation of someone ...
3
votes
4answers
640 views

Difference between “larder” and “pantry”

What is the difference between larder and pantry? Is it size? Or content? I found very similar definitions for both terms, something like a room/place in which food is stored. Which of the ...
3
votes
3answers
122 views

“Arrive at” or “arrive in”?

While reading a short story by Washington Irving called The Adventure of the German Student, I came across this line: Wolfgang arrived at Paris at the breaking out of the revolution. Why has the ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

With or without apostrophe?

Why is it "King's Road or Queen's Road" but "Princes Road"? Also Wikipedia says that "Kings Road" is okay but would it be alright to say "Prince's Road"?
-1
votes
1answer
177 views

differences beetween Surpass & Exceed

I'm confused beetween two words when i tried to conplete this sentence : Sales of the TX 20 digital camera recently .... 10.000 in total A.Surpassed B.Exceeded The key gives A , but i don't know ...
0
votes
1answer
343 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “pure” will(power)?

In English, we use the phrase "sheer force" much more often than "pure force" (Google Ngram). And willpower. What is the difference, in meaning and usage, between the two (and is there a reason for ...
2
votes
2answers
120 views

What is the difference between “take notes” and “make notes”? [closed]

Most dictionaries simply say that to take/make notes means to write notes. Is there anything more to this simple definition?
2
votes
3answers
865 views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA "word-for-word" has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". "Word-by-word" has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word" (but some with ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

“to” or “of” or both whilst referring to cities and places

I saw these billboards today: Turkey home of Istanbul Turkey home of Nemrut Nemrut is a mountain in Turkey with prehistoric monuments, and I think home of is the new slogan for Turkey. ...
-1
votes
2answers
76 views

coming to the shops or going to the shops? [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Do you mind COMING to the shops with me? Do you mind GOING to the shops with me?
-1
votes
1answer
118 views

present continuous, be going to, or both? [duplicate]

In Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate (Prodromou, 2005), Chapter 2 covers "the future", "be going to", "present continuous", and "present simple". I put three of the End-Of-Chapter questions ...
-1
votes
1answer
494 views

Difference between “at that time” / “that time”

What's the difference between at that time / that time? When I faced the issue previously, at that time John helped us to resolve it. When I faced the issue previously, that time John helped us ...
1
vote
4answers
116 views

what is the difference between a spy and an informer?

Is a "spy" different from an "informer"? If the answer is yes, what differences are there?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

what's the difference between “Remarks” and “Note”?

When I make a table, there is a column we left for the things we forget to write down on it. What would we call this item? Remarks or Note?
0
votes
1answer
118 views

present continuous or be going to?

In his book, Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate, Luck Prodromou has ruled out the possibility of using 'be going to' to complete the following sentence : 'What .......... you .......... ...
1
vote
2answers
569 views

What's the difference between “Conference” and “Meeting”?

See:The meeting will be held in a conference room at 10:00 am. Is there any problem if I change the position of these two words in the sentence like "The conference will be held in a meeting room at ...
3
votes
6answers
1k views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
0
votes
3answers
309 views

What's the difference between the words “journey”, “travel” and “trip”?

As they always were interchangeable in an article, I just want to know the difference.
0
votes
2answers
598 views

Difference between mug, jug, jar, etc

When I try to translate the German word "Krug" into English, LEO shows me without further distinction: flagon jar jug mug tankard pitcher But as far as I know, they cannot always used ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Difference between the words of violent criticisms

What is the exact difference between: revile castigate inveigh asperse culminate vituperate vilify In what context are these words used?
0
votes
1answer
810 views

Difference between: “would be”, “will be”, and “is/are -ing”

Which one is correct? Heard you would be going. Heard you will be going. Heard you are going. What differences are there?
2
votes
1answer
458 views

What are the differences between “seems not” and “doesn't seem”?

Are the following sentences correct? He seems not to want to help us and He seems want to help us. Is it correct if I use "seem" in a negative sentence? Which role does "seem" play? ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Which preposition to use with “forum”

I would hugely appreciate your help thinking through the tagline for a new online forum we are creating. The current version reads: A Forum on Our Economy, National Security and Sustainability. ...
2
votes
3answers
257 views

Difference between 'crow's feet' and 'worry lines'

I came across the phrases 'crow's feet' and 'worry lines' several times. Please enlighten me about the origin of these two phrases and the difference between them.
0
votes
1answer
66 views

How to identify the words with same pronunciation?

How to identify or differentiate the words with same pronunciation. As saying with example, speak with mic. speak with mike. So my question is when you hear these two words, How you can identify ...
0
votes
1answer
168 views

“come/spring to mind” or “come/spring to your mind”?

Which one is proper English: Come/spring to mind Or Come/spring to your mind? Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English clearly states that possessive adjectives should not be used.
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Difference between article, tutorial, how-to, course, track

I find these words(keywords) article, tutorial, how-to, course, track...etc some what same but CS people always use them (even my tutor) in different ways.. Don't assume this is about the programming ...
1
vote
1answer
214 views

What's the difference between “general” and “generic”?

What is the difference between them? Do they have different meanings? When should I use "general" or "generic"?
0
votes
4answers
339 views

What's the difference between “attendee” and “participant”?

Attendee: Someone who is at an event such as a meeting or a course. Participant: Someone who is taking part in an activity or event. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
1
vote
1answer
455 views

Is there a difference between “at the example of” and “using the example of”?

"This is illustrated at the example of Foobar." versus "This is illustrated using the example of Foobar." Are they interchangeable? If not, what is the difference?
0
votes
1answer
161 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
2
votes
2answers
844 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.