This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2answers
87 views

Are bilingual and fluent synonymous? [closed]

Do you think there is a difference between: I'm bilingual in English. I speak English fluently.
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2answers
55 views

Participating x participative [closed]

Is it possible to say that a person is 'participating'? E.g.: John is a participating student. Instead of: John is a participative student.
1
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1answer
49 views

Tired by waiting

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting Why Rudyard Kipling used the preposition "by"instead of "of"? What the difference?
5
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2answers
127 views

Less unhealthy vs. healthier

I was having a conversation with a friend regarding smoking cessation. After mentioning that I began using an e-cigarette, he referred to it as a "healthier" alternative. I refuted by stating that it ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Trump and Trumpery

Reading "Trumpery - A Twitter meme caused lookups to spike" on M-W got me wondering about Trump and Trumpery. I meant about the words itself and not about candidate Donald Trump's qualities. Trump ...
2
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2answers
60 views

Is there always a difference between 'is the' and 'is a'?

For instance, 'every dog owner is the friend of a dog owner' vs 'every dog owner is a friend of a dog owner'. For me, the former seems to imply that every dog owner is the friend of a particular dog ...
1
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1answer
185 views

Difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun?

What is the difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun? I am confused because the examples I found are quite similar. Noun clause in apposition to a ...
0
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1answer
95 views

“Have ever eaten” or “Ever ate”

I'd like to express that the steak I had (last Sunday) was the best one I have ever eaten. Is "Have ever eaten" correct or do I have to use the past simple "I ever ate", since the process (of eating) ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Is this sentence ambiguous? “For all subsets c, d belong to a, …”

I wrote a math practice question as For all subsets C, D belong to A, is it true..... What I meant was both C and D are the subsets of A. However, a student said what he understood is the "...
2
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3answers
69 views

Are “worth” and “value” interchangeable? [closed]

Say I was to describe someone (or something) as: "Having a lot of value". Could I also say: "Having a lot of worth" and mean the same thing? Edit, another example: "This document ...
5
votes
2answers
59 views

Why does the word “be” change so much?

In the phrase make <someone> {adjective}, it implies changing that person's emotion, but make <someone> be {adjective} implies forcing that person to comply. Why does the word "be", which ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

what are the differences among the storage things? [duplicate]

What are differences among wardrobe, cupboard, closet, drawer, cabinet and other terms used for objects in which things are stored? (I can't think of other terms right now.) For me wardrobe is only ...
5
votes
4answers
161 views

What's the difference between mar and spoil? [closed]

I would like to know if there is any difference between mar and spoil. It does not seem to have any difference, but I would like to know which one is more used, which is more formal and informal, and ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

state and country [duplicate]

What's the difference between "state" and "country" Why is it the Arab states but some Asian countries? Are the two words interchageble?
1
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6answers
135 views

“Cost” vs “expense” — a usage question

While editing some ad copy, and I was given the sentence, "Defending a lawsuit can be a big cost for your business." (My italics.) I keep thinking the proper word to use is "expense" rather than "...
3
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2answers
96 views

Difference between “prima facie” and “preliminary” evidence

I came across many sentences in empirical economics papers using the term: prima facie evidence Is there any difference between "prima facie" evidence and "preliminary evidence"?
1
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4answers
106 views

The difference between “would” and “used to”

Is it correct to say: I worked at a software company and I would sell different programs. To me, would does not sound appropriate here for past habits. Is selling considered a state like work ...
1
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1answer
66 views

Meaning of “Students in all majors” versus “Students of all majors”

I would like to know the difference between these sentences: I want to send an email to students of all majors I want to send an email to students in all majors How did of/in change the meaning of ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Need help with formation of this title

I am going to write my bachelor paper about how I am going to extend CASE tool transformation of integrity constrains from logical model to physical schema. I am not sure if it is relevant, but my ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Use of “skill” and “competence/competency” in specific scenario

To me, skills are something related to mechanical performance. Someone is very skilled at playing football, for instance. Competence/competency on the other hand is more related to knowledge. ...
0
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0answers
45 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
1
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2answers
114 views

Semantics of 'the extent which' vs 'the extent TO which'

'the extent which'    vs    2. 'the extent to which' : 3. Semantically, how do these compare? I know that to is a preposition and so a Functional Morpheme, but does 'to' affect anything ...
0
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2answers
116 views

Is “crazy” a noun?

The traditional grammar taught us that only noun, noun phrase or its equivalent, e.g., to infinitive or gerund (in traditional grammatical sense) could be a subject of a sentence. Now, I watched a ...
2
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2answers
11k views

The difference between ''cringy'' and ''cringey'' [closed]

Can anyone explain to me the difference between these two words? I looked up them in a dictionary but I find the both meanings to be quite similar. Also, is there any difference in their pronuncation?...
0
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1answer
44 views

OUT OF BREATH v.s BREATHLESS

What is the difference between 'out of breath' and 'breathless'? I have read the dictionary carefully. I saw an example is that:" We were out of breath after only five minutes''. And 'out of breath' ...
0
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2answers
117 views
1
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1answer
65 views

What is the difference between “ago” and “before”? [closed]

What is the difference between ago and before when they are both used as adverbs in the following sentences: I saw him seven days ago. and I had seen him seven days before.
1
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2answers
167 views

What's the difference between “imply” and “hint”? [closed]

I have a question. What's the difference between these two words, imply and hint? They seem to have the same meaning in definition and if they actually mean the same, which one of them is more ...
0
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2answers
73 views

Using “across” after preposition “to”?

English is not my first language, and I often lose my confidence when I use across in my sentence. Could you please give me an advice on the sentence that I have written below? Health education ...
1
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3answers
122 views

I have never understood a word Alice “has said” or “said” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the use of present perfect in the subordinate clause. I want to say I've never understood Alice for as long as I've known her, so should I use the present perfect aspect in the ...
1
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1answer
229 views

What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”? [closed]

I found this link explained the difference between "etiquette" and "courtesy", as following the rules and being kind to others. The answer regarded "etiquette" is similar with "manners" If this ...
0
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0answers
47 views

“He is the instructor for this class” or “of this class”? Does the first one means he is the right person for this class?

I am new here and glad to join this site..It find it very instructive. Are these statements correct? In what context do we use them? He is the instructor for this class==> Does it mean: He is the ...
1
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2answers
87 views

Affect or Effect? [closed]

I still don't really know, despite trying to read the definitions. I believe this sentence is correct but let me know. I seriously wish I could foresee the future and know of all the different ...
1
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1answer
86 views

Difference between “should”, “would” and “ought to” [closed]

The sentence: It's essential that the documents should be destroyed immediately. Why can't ought to be used in place of should and why can't I go for would?
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2answers
102 views

Can I use “could” and “would” in the present tense? [closed]

Is it correct to say: She speaks so fast that I couldn't understand her.
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2answers
185 views

Functionality is working “fine” or “as expected”

Here the functionality is related with web Site responses. Now I'm looking for a sentence which would be preferable when, ABC functionality was not working before, (Explanation of some work ...
1
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4answers
93 views

What is the difference between “perpetrator” and “transgressor”? [closed]

I don't quite understand when one might be applied, but not the other. Also, is anyone who committed a transgression a transgressor, or might they also be perpetrators? Does it make a difference? ...
2
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0answers
72 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [closed]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning in ...
0
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0answers
43 views

Difference between etymologies of 'allocable' and 'allocatable'

Which one is more proper to use: 'allocable' or 'allocatable'? Sources say the former is derived from the original Latin word 'allocare', while the latter is a part-of-speech-variant of the English ...
1
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2answers
98 views

The Use of the Present Perfect. What is natural?

Sometimes, I got really confused by the use of the Present Perfect tense. Given the fact, that we don't have this structure in Russian, all we can is to base our knowledge on grammar rules. The ...
2
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2answers
71 views

Metaphysician vs Metaphysicist

A practitioner of physics is known as a physicist. It seems like it would logically follow that a practitioner of metaphysics would be known as a metaphysicist; yet, in every text I've read, a ...
0
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2answers
242 views

Word Choice: Starting a sentence with “If not too long ago”

I know that the proper way to use "not too long ago" is: "Not too long ago, contractors used to build houses and sell them to dealers. It was the responsibility of the dealers to provide financing to ...
0
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1answer
84 views

What is the difference between amid and amidst?

I googled it and got the following answer: Amid and amidst are two words meaning the same thing. The meaning of these words is in connection with position of the object, person or situation – in the ...
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3answers
172 views

The difference between the phrases “leave the house” and “leave home” [closed]

Good evening! I began to learn English and I am wonder if there is any difference between the phrases "leave the house" and "leave home" (the context is "Usually I get up at 7 o'clock and leave home/...
1
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1answer
75 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
1
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2answers
325 views

Difference between Keep on+V-ing and Keep+V-ing

Please help me to find out the answer. Am I right if I say I keep on walking in this dark way? or I keep walking in this dark way? What is the difference between the two sentences?
0
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0answers
36 views

What is the difference between 'avoided with the use of' or 'by the use of'?

I am reading a text that refers to a ship accident that caused serious damage to the environment and was partly due to lack of knowledge of maritime English. The related sentence included this wording:...
3
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1answer
455 views

What is the difference between “mourning” and “grieving” someone's death?

It seems to me that both words are interchangeable, I can mourn or grieve the death of a loved one for weeks, months or years. And both terms mean to feel deep sorrow for the loss of someone dear. ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Are “Network Planning” and “Networks Planning” different?

Does the 's' in 'Networks' imply a different meaning, or are the two interchangeable? Thanks!
0
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1answer
278 views

“In your time” or “at your time”?

I have a partner who lives sumptuously in a different time zone. I've been wondering which is the correct way of putting it: 11 p.m. in your time or 11 p.m. at your time Thank you!