This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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1
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1answer
41 views

Medium or medium-sized?

We say a medium-sized pan/book/house, but medium height/amount/size. But I came across an example in Cambridge Advanced learner's Dictionary: "Chop one medium carrot." I wonder if we can use medium ...
1
vote
3answers
93 views

Difference between “to cost” and “to be worth”

What is the difference between "to cost" and "to be worth"? Are they mutually replaceable and if not why? For example, is it correct to say that something costs its price.
3
votes
3answers
187 views

“Hard disk” vs. “Hard drive” vs. “Hard disk drive”

Recently, I experienced a communication failure talking to somebody about a "hard drive" until I could actually show the person what I was talking about. "Oh, a hard disk! I thought you were ...
-1
votes
1answer
34 views

Effect and Affect [duplicate]

The new equipment had a positive effect on the business. The new equipment had a positive affect on the business. Am I right in saying that the top sentence has the correct use of effect/affect and ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

To “call” vs “name” an unknown thing

Suppose something unknown is in a black box (upd. I mean a simple box, imagine some kind of TV show, where someone has to guess what is inside that box). I give a description of this thing and then ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Expressions to use in English about “for” and “to”

This question is about “for” and “to” in terms of destination or direction. Which is right? Are they both right? Could you give me more examples and information about the usage of for and to? a. Is ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Leave something vs. forget something

Can you forget something somewhere? I expect that much more common is I have left my book at home. But, based on other languages where it is quite common (and based on the fact that I somehow ...
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

Remember, recall, memorize a forgotten word [closed]

Situtation: I have a conversation and want to say "The door is closed" but I forget the word "closed". So I ask my conversational partner to help me. Which words are the best, which can be acceptable ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

“large field of view” vs “high field of view”

Which one is right between "large field of view" and "high field of view"?
0
votes
2answers
114 views

What is the difference between “linger” and “loiter”? [closed]

What is the difference between linger and loiter?
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Difference between spine-tingling and spine-chilling?

I've learned the word 'spine-tingling' in an Oxford book. While when I look up that word in the Websters dictionary,there only comes out 'spine-chilling'. I perceived them as synonyms but no evidence ...
30
votes
13answers
3k views

What is the “fundamental” difference between ‘search’ and ‘seek’?

So why do human beings spend so much time playing? One reason is that we have time for leisure; animals have very little time to play as most of their life is spent sleeping and (2)________ food. ...
6
votes
3answers
421 views

Anywhere vs somewhere [closed]

Which one should I use: Are you going somewhere nice on holiday this year? or Are you going anywhere nice on holiday this year? The presence of the word "nice" bothers me a bit ...
1
vote
2answers
108 views

What's the difference between “dove” and “pigeon,” if any?

They direct to the same Wikipedia page which suggests doves are more often slightly smaller but indicates a lack of consistent difference. I had thought there was a stronger distinction...but does ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
2
votes
1answer
104 views

What is the difference between formal & standard written English? [closed]

What is the difference between formal written English and standard written English? Can standard written English be formal or vice versa? Are these synonymous or is there a distinctive difference ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

How can I use “other” in singular and plural? [closed]

What is the difference between other and another? I know that another is only for singular and other can be used in singular or plural. Can you give some examples?
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Difference between “rank” and “score” [closed]

I am computing a scoring system for employee performance. I will have elements that need to be ranked a value 0-5 depending on employee's depth on that element. The elements will be weighted and a ...
0
votes
2answers
510 views

What is difference between “xxx, although yyy” and “although yyy, xxx”?

For instance: I hate it, although it is funny. Although it is funny, I hate it. Is there difference?
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Understanding the difference between “forecast” and “predict” [closed]

What's the difference between the words "forecast" and "predict"?
3
votes
1answer
40 views

The difference between “discomfit” and “discomfort.” [closed]

There isn't a lot to say, really, except that I just want to know the difference between the two words as verbs. I found that dictionaries give definitions so overlapping that the words sound as if ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Present continuous vs Present perfect continuous [closed]

I am waiting for you for almost an hour I have been waiting for you for almost an hour What's the difference? Are both OK?
0
votes
2answers
3k views

What's the difference between “tomorrow's meeting” and “meeting tomorrow” [closed]

What's the difference between "tomorrow's meeting" and "meeting tomorrow"? Regarding these sentences below, are both correct? I have to attend the tomorrow's meeting. I have to attend the ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Height and Tallness

We use the words "tall" and "high" to mean different things. A dwarf on top of a mountain is high but not tall. A professional basketball player in Death Valley is tall but not high. Note: I am ...
5
votes
1answer
92 views

Thoughts on today's article on “farther” vs “further”?

See the article for context. Seems like a plausible suggestion to me, but I'm curious what others think. Consider the house, tree, and sunflower in the illustration at the top of this post. The ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

the use of “rather than”

I see these sentences in the dictionary,how do I distinguish when I use "rather than"? Why didn't you ask for help,rather than trying to do it on your own?(v. ing) Rather than go straight ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

difference between affectation and hypocrisy? [closed]

is there any difference concering the usage/connotation of the words affectation and hypocrisy? is there any example where you would use hypocrisy instead of affectation or the other way round?
10
votes
4answers
500 views

What is the difference between “incidence” and “occurrence”?

This was a question in a test: Do you have any figures showing the _______ of left-handedness in the general population? Two of the answers were "occurrence" and "incidence". "incidence" was the ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

How do you pronounce the word of “via”? [duplicate]

The pronounciation of "via" has two ways. ˈvaɪə ˈviːə What's the difference? Please give me an advice. Thanks.
3
votes
1answer
103 views

Difference between 'melancholic' and adjective 'melancholy'?

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives melancholy and melancholic? Can they be used interchangeably? The Oxford Learner's Dictionaries define them as follows: melancholy ...
2
votes
1answer
109 views

Difference in usage of “all right”, “ok”, “very well”

When I agree with doing something annoying or what I originally didn't want to do is there a difference between starting the reply with: "all right", "ok", "very well" or others? Does "very well" ...
3
votes
1answer
98 views

What is the difference between more, further, and additional?

Is there a difference between: "For more information, please contact..." "For further information, please contact..." "For additional information, please contact..." If there is a difference, what ...
-1
votes
1answer
58 views

What is the difference between “ auditorium” and “front-of-house”? [closed]

Auditorium and front-of-house stand for the place in theatre where the audience sit. Can we use them interchangeably or is there any difference between them?
4
votes
1answer
967 views

What is the difference between 'man' and 'human'?

What is the difference between "Man" and "Human" in the broad senses of mankind and humanity? I recognize that some object to the term "mankind" because of the gender connotations. I was wondering if, ...
4
votes
3answers
204 views

What is the difference between 'until' and 'up until'?

I guess It's just that the second one is more emphatic, and perhaps more informal. But which one would you prefer after stressing words like 'right' and 'even'? She kept studying right until dawn. ...
2
votes
3answers
37 views

Difference between obsession and absorption

Absorption means a state of being completely engrossed in something. An obsession means being continually preoccupied with something. In context to someone's working habit do they both mean same? ...
3
votes
2answers
57 views

“There is (noun)” vs. “(noun) is”

What's the difference in meaning or nuance between the following two sentences? And, for what purpose do you use each of the two following sentence constructions: There is a stack of unopened ...
1
vote
0answers
85 views

shall we start and shall we get started

I was watching Ted 2 and then Morgan said "Shall we get started?", and I was wondering what is the difference between "Shall we start?" and "Shall we get started?"
0
votes
1answer
889 views

Difference between “civic rights” and “civil rights”

Is there any difference in meaning between the term "civic rights" and the term "civil rights"? Or are they completely interchangeable?
0
votes
1answer
95 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
1
vote
2answers
655 views

What's the difference between “should've wrote” and “should've written”? [closed]

I've heard an American guy say "should've wrote", but as I far as I know, there is supposed to be a past participle (like "written") after "have". Can anybody explain it to me?
0
votes
2answers
84 views

France-educated or French-educated

If a renowned scholar was born, let's say, in Japan, and he/she receives a Nobel Prize thanks to a dissertation he/she wrote in France after studying there for a master's degree and a doctor's degree, ...
0
votes
2answers
168 views

Difference between an Explanation and a Description from the view of critical reasoning

Note, this is homework, but I'm NOT looking for someone to do my homework for me. For my Critical Reasoning course, I'm tasked with categorizing the following passage as either a description, or an ...
1
vote
1answer
131 views

“Is that OK [with/to] you?”

What's the difference between “Is that OK to you?” and “Is that OK with you?” Thank you in advance.
2
votes
4answers
342 views

What's the difference among “discuss” and “debate” and “argue”? [duplicate]

These difference are "formal" or "informal" ? Actually, by E-mail, I often use "discuss" in case of private and work. I've never used "debate" and "argue".
1
vote
1answer
108 views

What is the difference between those two sentences (grammatically and in meaning)?

An inappropriate TV show for children should be banned on any type of channels. A TV show inappropriate for children should be banned on any type of channels. It seems to me that there is ...
2
votes
1answer
355 views

'Catalyst for' vs 'catalyst to'

I came across this sentence in an exercise: 'Arkwright is considered the father of the modern industrial factory system and his inventions were a catalyst ___ the Industrial Revolution.' There are 3 ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Sawmills vs other mills [closed]

A flour mill makes flour. A paper mill makes paper. A puppy mill breeds puppies. But a sawmill makes... saws? No - it uses saws to make wood products. Can anyone explain the etymology or language ...
0
votes
2answers
271 views

“Easy” vs. “simple”

Are those two words equivalent or is there a difference? When would I say something is easy rather than simple, or vice versa?
2
votes
1answer
94 views

An item is originally packed or packaged?

I'm about to list a brand new CD on eBay. The listing assumes a condition note where I want to point out, that the item is brand new and originally packed. Google Translate suggests to change the ...