This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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1answer
226 views

What is the difference in meaning and usage between “gather” and “collect”?

I was wondering what the actual difference between these two expressions is, since I recently read about "collecting mushrooms" but also about "gathering berries". Is there even any?
4
votes
2answers
226 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
2
votes
4answers
813 views

“Worried person” vs. “concerned person”

According to H. Stephens, "There is a great difference between worry and concern. A worried person sees a problem, and a concerned person solves a problem". But ODE seems to be disagreeing with him: ...
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0answers
45 views

I wish I were versus I wish I had been [duplicate]

Is there any difference when I say I wish I were rich or I wish I had been rich?
0
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1answer
248 views

“A person” versus “some person”

What is the difference between: There is a person in the room. There is some person in the room.
-1
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2answers
58 views

How to state the negotiation failed? [closed]

Are there any grammatical errors in the sentence? "I regret to inform you that "name of company" people are looking for students who are from CSE/IT background. We tried to negotiate, but it ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

When should I use: I did, had done or have done? [duplicate]

Please explain when I should use: I did vs. I had done or I had done vs. I have done? Sometimes I tend to get confused about which one to use. Thanks.
1
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1answer
1k views

Correct use of lie or lay in the following context

I based my final year project around web technologies where my strengths lie. OR I based my final year project around web technologies where my strengths lay.
1
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2answers
92 views

Committee, Association and Assembly — What's the differrence?

I'm confused by these 3 words and I'm not quite sure what the differences are. I know how council, commission and committee differ, but I can't find it for Assembly and Association. I'm using it for a ...
-1
votes
4answers
1k views

Difference between 'I would like to be' & 'I want to be'

I would like to be and I want to be What is the difference between them? I think 'want to be' sounds stronger than 'like to be,' but I'm not sure if this is true.
0
votes
2answers
251 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “utter” in the sense of enphasis if there is any whatsoever?

English is not my first language. I don’t know the difference between sheer and utter used for emphasis. For example, instead “That’s utter nonsense” can I say “That’s sheer nonsense” instead?
0
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1answer
139 views

Difference between “queue” and “enqueue” [closed]

What is the difference between queue and enqueue given that both are verbs?
-1
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1answer
120 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
2
votes
3answers
156 views

Similarities and differences: 'in + VERBing' vs 'VERBing' alone

Source: p 145, Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer In being an empirical response to an empirical claim, this explanation engages Realism on its own terms, and so little can be said ...
0
votes
2answers
137 views

“What about” vs. ”what of”

Example from page 75 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: But what of mandatory authorities? Are they as “binding” as the traditional terminology suggests? The answer depends on what ...
-3
votes
3answers
650 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [closed]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. although the ...
0
votes
3answers
117 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
1
vote
1answer
84 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
2
votes
0answers
79 views

What’s the difference between “cite” and “cite to”? [closed]

From page 69 of Frederick Shauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New York state court may cite to a case decided in Vermont . . . The courts are not even required to cite to these “authorities,” let ...
1
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0answers
126 views

“Recover against” vs. “recover from” [closed]

From page 53 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: If Judge Cardozo had said, “We hold that in all cases involving a nonbusiness consumer and a manufacturer of goods, the consumer may ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

“brain-cramp” vs “blank-out” [closed]

When mind lapses instantly I call it blank-out. Recently I have come across brain-cramp and it is providing almost same meaning as blank-out. Are both same ? Cramp word is not playing big heavy dice ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

“to be of” vs “to be”

[Finally, Marshall pointed to the judge's oath ... Part of the core of this reasoning is found in the following statements from the decision: (source, around fifteen lines above the heading ...
2
votes
4answers
675 views

Being Clever vs Being Wise

A sage is wise. That young woman is clever. Both of them (I think) are good at not getting into unwanted trouble, and both are good at solving problems. So.. Is there a difference between being ...
-1
votes
1answer
49 views

“to amend” vs “to make amends” [closed]

What are the similarites and differences? I'm guessing from ...
1
vote
2answers
158 views

Difference between use of “ephemeral” and “transient”?

What are some differences between the ways/contexts in which one would use "ephemeral" versus "transient", and vice versa?
0
votes
1answer
81 views

disputant vs disputer

Any differences in meaning? The dictionary doesn't explain. Google Ngrams This dispute between the king and the estate of William Bankes, owner of coastal land including Corfe Castle, concerned ...
0
votes
0answers
74 views

What's wrong with 'due to'? [duplicate]

Under defn 1 does http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/due_1 avouch: Some people think that it is more correct to use owing to to mean ‘because of’ after a verb or at the ...
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votes
1answer
63 views

What's the difference between “family affair” and “family stuff”

I'll take one day leave for my family affair. I'll take one day leave for my family stuff. What's the different exactly? Or what situation is the best to use "affair", and "stuff" ?
0
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3answers
476 views

What is the difference between “any” or ”every”?

Consider: The system is deterministic if any two runs produce the same result. Can I say every instead of any in every such sentence?
1
vote
1answer
297 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

could and might to talk about future possibility

I have problem with using could in the future possibilities for example: They have the technology, but unless the government makes stricter laws, car companies ____ do it. With which one should I ...
2
votes
2answers
269 views

Why is there “Black English” but not “White English”?

African American Vernacular English is shortened to a less precise phrase "Black English". Also, Black English is used in a broader sense: Black English is a term used for both dialects of English ...
3
votes
3answers
113 views

'susceptible of' vs 'susceptible to"

What are their similarities and differences? The definitions on http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/susceptible look similar: for example, A is 'influenced or affected' by B, ...
4
votes
10answers
1k views

What is the difference between “deployment” and “release”?

In work environment, we frequently encounter the words "deployment" and "release" in technical context. I often hear them used interchangeably also. It is mainly related to "Release and Deployment ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Why not 'to effect'? [closed]

To give effect to something or to carry/bring/put something into effect is to make it begin doing what it was intended to do. Are these verb phrases ('to give effect...', to + verb + into + ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

'pray to someone' vs 'pray someone'

What are the similarities and differences? I had always believed in the first, that 'pray' admits only an indirect object. Yet Google Ngram refutes this. For example, does the following admit of ...
1
vote
2answers
118 views

What is the difference between “router” and “route”? [closed]

I need to understand the difference and the application of both words (route/routes and router/routers). I plan to apply one of words to define the route of a URL for a website. For instance: URL ...
1
vote
1answer
166 views

Present Perfect vs Present + Adjective

What are the similarities and differences, for example, between "they are agreed" vs "they've agreed." Also, is there a formal grammatical term for the construct "they are agreed" ? ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

intermix vs mix

What are the differences? Are they everywhere interchangeable? Isn't intermix redundant, because if you mix A and B, then you must be mixing them together? For example, can mix be used in: Law and ...
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
1
vote
1answer
280 views

ethic vs ethics

Would someone please compare these two? Or is this correct, even though it adduces nothing? As a noun (and not adj), ethic = A set of moral principles, especially ones relating to or affirming a ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Bleed *at* the arm or *from* the arm?

I have, to the best of my recollection, only ever used or heard: He was bleeding from the arm. ... but my student informs me that she learnt it as: He was bleeding at the arm. The latter ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

What is the difference between 'Frequentative' and 'Aorist'?

I've looked on Wikipedia, done some searching, and still I am unable to figure out what the difference is between the two.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

What is the difference between “not that X is going to Y” and “X is not going to Y”? [closed]

Not that running away is going to solve everything. Running away is not going to solve everything. I am not a native speaker. Is there a difference between the two?
-1
votes
2answers
72 views

Is there any difference between deputies & lawmakers? [closed]

As a non-native speaker quite often I get in trouble with slight differences between concepts. So, regarding to this doubt I think both of them are used to express the same thing but I'm not sure ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

what is the difference in the usage of the following? [duplicate]

What is the difference in the usage of "whom" and "who"? please also tell me the rules behind their usage and some examples to clarify their difference.
1
vote
1answer
152 views

“The key doesn't work” vs. “The key is not working” [closed]

Here's a situation. You go to your hotel room and the key that you have is not working. When you go back to the reception, should you say: The key is not working, can you fix it. Or The key ...
2
votes
1answer
148 views

Suasion vs Persuasion

I referenced http://english.stackexchange.com/a/22445/50720 but it doesn't apply for these nouns? suasion = [mass noun] formal Persuasion as opposed to force or compulsion: I also tried ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“supervisor” vs. “mentor”

In master's theses it is common to state two people who oversaw or should have overseen the project. It is common that only one of these engaged himself with the student's work. At my university ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between after and afterwards? [closed]

What are you going to do afterwards? What are you going to do after? Which one is the correct one and why?