This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0answers
110 views

“Recover against” vs. “recover from” [closed]

From page 53 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: If Judge Cardozo had said, “We hold that in all cases involving a nonbusiness consumer and a manufacturer of goods, the consumer may ...
1
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1answer
61 views

“brain-cramp” vs “blank-out” [closed]

When mind lapses instantly I call it blank-out. Recently I have come across brain-cramp and it is providing almost same meaning as blank-out. Are both same ? Cramp word is not playing big heavy dice ...
0
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1answer
51 views

“to be of” vs “to be”

[Finally, Marshall pointed to the judge's oath ... Part of the core of this reasoning is found in the following statements from the decision: (source, around fifteen lines above the heading ...
2
votes
4answers
308 views

Being Clever vs Being Wise

A sage is wise. That young woman is clever. Both of them (I think) are good at not getting into unwanted trouble, and both are good at solving problems. So.. Is there a difference between being ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

“to amend” vs “to make amends” [closed]

What are the similarites and differences? I'm guessing from ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

Difference between use of “ephemeral” and “transient”?

What are some differences between the ways/contexts in which one would use "ephemeral" versus "transient", and vice versa?
0
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1answer
73 views

disputant vs disputer

Any differences in meaning? The dictionary doesn't explain. Google Ngrams This dispute between the king and the estate of William Bankes, owner of coastal land including Corfe Castle, concerned ...
0
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0answers
62 views

What's wrong with 'due to'? [duplicate]

Under defn 1 does http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/due_1 avouch: Some people think that it is more correct to use owing to to mean ‘because of’ after a verb or at the ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

What's the difference between “family affair” and “family stuff”

I'll take one day leave for my family affair. I'll take one day leave for my family stuff. What's the different exactly? Or what situation is the best to use "affair", and "stuff" ?
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3answers
230 views

What is the difference between “any” or ”every”?

Consider: The system is deterministic if any two runs produce the same result. Can I say every instead of any in every such sentence?
1
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1answer
221 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
1
vote
1answer
225 views

could and might to talk about future possibility

I have problem with using could in the future possibilities for example: They have the technology, but unless the government makes stricter laws, car companies ____ do it. With which one should I ...
2
votes
2answers
192 views

Why is there “Black English” but not “White English”?

African American Vernacular English is shortened to a less precise phrase "Black English". Also, Black English is used in a broader sense: Black English is a term used for both dialects of English ...
3
votes
3answers
92 views

'susceptible of' vs 'susceptible to"

What are their similarities and differences? The definitions on http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/susceptible look similar: for example, A is 'influenced or affected' by B, ...
0
votes
3answers
302 views

What is the difference between “deployment” and “release”?

In work environment, we frequently encounter the words "deployment" and "release" in technical context. I often hear them used interchangeably also. It is mainly related to "Release and Deployment ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Why not 'to effect'? [closed]

To give effect to something or to carry/bring/put something into effect is to make it begin doing what it was intended to do. Are these verb phrases ('to give effect...', to + verb + into + ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

'pray to someone' vs 'pray someone'

What are the similarities and differences? I had always believed in the first, that 'pray' admits only an indirect object. Yet Google Ngram refutes this. For example, does the following admit of ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

What is the difference between “router” and “route”? [closed]

I need to understand the difference and the application of both words (route/routes and router/routers). I plan to apply one of words to define the route of a URL for a website. For instance: URL ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Present Perfect vs Present + Adjective

What are the similarities and differences, for example, between "they are agreed" vs "they've agreed." Also, is there a formal grammatical term for the construct "they are agreed" ? ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

intermix vs mix

What are the differences? Are they everywhere interchangeable? Isn't intermix redundant, because if you mix A and B, then you must be mixing them together? For example, can mix be used in: Law and ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
1
vote
1answer
140 views

ethic vs ethics

Would someone please compare these two? Or is this correct, even though it adduces nothing? As a noun (and not adj), ethic = A set of moral principles, especially ones relating to or affirming a ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Bleed *at* the arm or *from* the arm?

I have, to the best of my recollection, only ever used or heard: He was bleeding from the arm. ... but my student informs me that she learnt it as: He was bleeding at the arm. The latter ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

What is the difference between 'Frequentative' and 'Aorist'?

I've looked on Wikipedia, done some searching, and still I am unable to figure out what the difference is between the two.
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “not that X is going to Y” and “X is not going to Y”? [closed]

Not that running away is going to solve everything. Running away is not going to solve everything. I am not a native speaker. Is there a difference between the two?
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votes
2answers
60 views

Is there any difference between deputies & lawmakers? [closed]

As a non-native speaker quite often I get in trouble with slight differences between concepts. So, regarding to this doubt I think both of them are used to express the same thing but I'm not sure ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

what is the difference in the usage of the following? [duplicate]

What is the difference in the usage of "whom" and "who"? please also tell me the rules behind their usage and some examples to clarify their difference.
1
vote
1answer
115 views

“The key doesn't work” vs. “The key is not working” [closed]

Here's a situation. You go to your hotel room and the key that you have is not working. When you go back to the reception, should you say: The key is not working, can you fix it. Or The key ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Suasion vs Persuasion

I referenced http://english.stackexchange.com/a/22445/50720 but it doesn't apply for these nouns? suasion = [mass noun] formal Persuasion as opposed to force or compulsion: I also tried ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

“supervisor” vs. “mentor”

In master's theses it is common to state two people who oversaw or should have overseen the project. It is common that only one of these engaged himself with the student's work. At my university ...
2
votes
2answers
905 views

What's the difference between after and afterwards? [closed]

What are you going to do afterwards? What are you going to do after? Which one is the correct one and why?
0
votes
2answers
100 views

Difference between two question formats?

I have seen people using following two formats to form a question: 1) Why do people lie? 2) Why people lie? The difference is, in the first one, there is an explicit use of do whereas the ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the difference between a Cathedral and a Minster? [closed]

In the UK we have a lot of Cathedrals. We also have York Minster but I'm unsure what is special about York that makes it a Minster rather than another Cathedral. The only other case I can think of is ...
11
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the difference between a murder and an assassination? [closed]

I am unsure what the technical difference is between a murder and an assassination. Instinctively I feel it's to do with the victim - perhaps their fame? Royalty? What is the distinction between the ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

“An exclamation” or “An ejaculation” ? Are these words synonymous? [closed]

Exclamations and ejaculations are usually expressions of surprise or anxiety, something said quickly and suddenly. Grammatically they are always interjections and may seem to be the same kind of ...
1
vote
1answer
482 views

What is the difference between “here goes” and “here it goes”?

I’m wondering what the difference between here goes and here it goes is. When something is going down and I want to express my feeling of “I’ll make it!”, which expression is correct? For example, ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “as though” and “as if”? [duplicate]

I'm genuinely in confusion when it comes to using those two: can I draw a distintive line in using them? Thank you.
4
votes
3answers
539 views

“They were seduced” vs. “They were swayed”

I ran across the verb "sway" a little while ago and I was wondering about its usage. See: They were seduced by the low cost of the house. And They were swayed by the low cost of the house. ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

“Could have” vs “might have” (in lucky escape situation)

That was a lucky escape! You might have been killed. That was a lucky escape! You could have been killed. Which one is more suitable in this situation? Is there any difference between ...
3
votes
3answers
729 views

Difference between “ad hoc” and “impromptu” [closed]

Is there any difference between "ad hoc" and "impromptu"? Can you find sentences where only one of the words is acceptable and the other is not? And where they are interchangeable? What about the ...
1
vote
3answers
112 views

what is the difference betweeen “accumulation” and “aggregation”

I looked up meriam webster and the two definitions seem to semantically largely overlap. the only thing hinting towards the existense of distinctness between the two terms, seemed to be: that the ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

Fluctuate vs. oscillate [closed]

I understand that you say hesitate in the moral context. But what is the difference between oscillation and fluctuation? Might be you could contrast these with swinging. Is there any difference when ...
3
votes
2answers
252 views

Contemplate vs consider

After reading an article recently, I wondered when one should use contemplate over consider. I searched for the issue on Google and found that: In that context, they're essentially the same. ...
2
votes
3answers
961 views

What is the difference between saying “I wasn't knowing” and “I didn't know”? [closed]

I was wondering what is the difference between I wasn't knowing and I didn't know? If I say, I wasn't knowing, I am talking about something unknown in past, the act of not knowing is finished, it ...
2
votes
2answers
337 views

“accuracy” or “accurateness”? [closed]

Do "accuracy" and "accurateness" have the exact same meaning? When is one of them preferred over the other one? "accurateness" does not exist as an entry in Oxford Dictionary of English and Longman ...
-1
votes
2answers
69 views

What is the difference?

Hello I was wondering what the difference was between these: I was having the man leave. I was having the man leaving. I had the man leaving. I had the man leave. are some of these ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

“solve with” vs “solve for”

I would like to get a clarification whether I do understand and use those two phrases correctly or not. The context is solving a mathematical problem. solved with sth - means a problem is tackled ...
0
votes
2answers
267 views

Is “give me a five” the same as “give me five” or incorrect?

I mean the physical gesture of slapping hands together. Any difference between them? Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
2answers
196 views

Upside down vs downside up

Typically when something is reversed or inverted we say it is "upside down", could we also say that it is also "downside up"? For example... "The picture is upside down" could we also say it ...