This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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-1
votes
1answer
58 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
3
votes
4answers
340 views

Difference between 'to the left' and 'on the left'

I have encountered these expressions today, when I was describing a photo. People are lining up in the picture. I wanted to explain someone who is standing next to the person on the far left. And I ...
0
votes
1answer
297 views

“How…?” vs. “What … like?”

In the Longman Dictionary of Common Errors you read "When you ask for or give a description of someone or something, use what ... like (NOT how): 'What's your new teacher like?' But I sometimes hear ...
1
vote
2answers
101 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Canny means shrewd or wise how does uncanny turn out to be mysterious? [closed]

Canny means 'shrewd' while uncanny means mysterious. How?
0
votes
2answers
236 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

This might turn out unnecessary vs This might turn out to be unnecessary

Which of the two expressions is correct? Is there any difference
2
votes
1answer
871 views

“Speak English” vs. “speak in English”

What is the difference between Speak English and Speak in English? Which one is (more) acceptable in this sentence: "You must speak English/ in English in class." Or, are both correct? If yes, what ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

What is the semantical difference between reliable and trustworthy?

When one literally translates the Dutch word betrouw-baar (dash added) one gets trust-worthy (dash added). But when one uses Google translate, it generates reliable. Based on my experience with ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

“Traffic rules” vs. “traffic regulations” [closed]

Which one is correct, "traffic rules" or "traffic regulations"? If both are correct, what is the difference between them?
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Questions about “get” vs. “was given” and the Passive Voice

What is the difference in meaning between got and was given? I understand that got is in the active voice, was given is in the passive voice, and that they are different verbs. But what is the ...
1
vote
3answers
212 views

“to prefer something over something” or “to prefer something to something” [duplicate]

Which syntax is more correct: to prefer something over something else or to prefer something to something else or maybe both are correct?
1
vote
3answers
526 views

The rules of the game vs. the laws of the game

Do rule and law have the same meaning when you talk about an activity like a game? I came across this sentence in the Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's Dictionay: "Match officials should not ...
0
votes
1answer
153 views

“like” vs. “as” Confusion in a sentence

Which is the correct sentence between the following: 1) He deserves the same fate as you 2) He deserves the same fate like you. From my knowledge and understanding, the second sentence is correct ...
0
votes
3answers
303 views

What is difference between <At the end / In the end>?

Can we use each of these sentences in everywhere or no?! It mean do they have different meanings?! Ex: I don't wanted to take sides, but in the end I had to. Or, I don't wanted to take sides, but at ...
11
votes
4answers
1k views

Are “smell like” and “smell of” the same?

Is there any difference between smell like and smell of? I came across this sentence in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary: My hands smell like (US) / of (UK) onion. But I'm not really ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

What are the difference between “details” and “information”?

I am confused of how to use them and their difference. To have better understanding for both readers and me, please categorise this these factors to the appropriate category ("details" and ...
-1
votes
3answers
694 views

Words that change meaning when a letter is added/removed/changed

Want to know if there is a collective word to describe these kind of words that change their meanings in an opposite way (rather than irrelevantly) when a single letter is added/removed/changed so ...
0
votes
3answers
92 views

What are the difference between “prominent” and “VIP”? [closed]

The definition of prominent and VIP are same: an important person So if I say: Mai is a prominent guy of Australia OR Mai is a V.I.P. of Australia. Isn't the meaning is the same?
4
votes
3answers
492 views

Roundel vs Roundabout [closed]

What, if any, is the difference between the two? My best guess is that a 'roundel' is the traffic island or structure that you drive around, while the 'roundabout' also includes the road you're ...
0
votes
1answer
213 views

Past Simple vs. Past Progressive

I've been noticing in conversations that people often use past or present or future progressive where I would normally use past, present or future simple. I know some rules about interrupted actions ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

When do we use “elder” “older” and “eldest”? [duplicate]

I'd appreciate it if someone explained everything regarding those three adjectives. They confuse me.
0
votes
1answer
113 views

“get one's head around” vs “get one's arms around”

I have seen both idioms used in practice. The definitions I found, http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+arms+around, and http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+head+around don't indicate much ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Difference between 'get at' and 'get on at'

E.g. 'My boss is always getting on at me even if I haven't done anything wrong.' 'Her parents keep getting at her for skipping classes.' I'm wondering whether these phrasal verbs have ...
1
vote
1answer
544 views

“replace” vs. “substitute”

When you replace somebody with somebody else, does it refer to a permanent change usually for a better one? In "The company replaced Alice with a new secretary", does it refer to a permanent change? ...
4
votes
2answers
132 views

Difference between “abate” and “bate”

What is the difference between abate and bate? How are they used differently? Do they both mean the same thing? (from the Free Dictionary) The definition of abate is 'to reduce in amount, degree, or ...
5
votes
3answers
593 views

Difference between an “issue” and a “challenge” [closed]

I've often heard the question asked, "What are the challenges and issues faced in implementing X technology?" or "What are the challenges and issues faced by X?". Do challenges and issues mean the ...
1
vote
3answers
104 views

“characteristic” vs. “typical”

What is the difference between characteristic and typical? I've seen that they both are used with kinda the same structure (be characteristic/typical of sb/sth) Like: "This hospitality is ...
1
vote
3answers
151 views

What is the difference between “He is polite” and “He is being polite”?

Can any one please explain the usage and meaning of "He is polite" and "He is being polite".
-1
votes
1answer
107 views

difference between emigrate, immigrate, and migrate? [closed]

what is the difference between emigrate, immigrate, and migrate? I am pretty much confused.
2
votes
2answers
60 views

When to use “in” and “at”

when do I use "in" and "at" in a sentence? for example is "I will coming to learn English in India or At India"
7
votes
1answer
309 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
2
votes
3answers
120 views

Difference between obfuscate and obscure?

I see the words used in the same situations. Is there a particular difference that would help me understand when each one should be used? Etymology Obfuscate Latin fuscus for dark Etymology Obscure ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

If you have/had/did not + verb + yet [duplicate]

What is the correct sentence(s) in those : 1 If you haven't read this yet, I recommend doing it. 2 If you had not read this yet, I recommend doing it. 3 If you didn't read this yet, ...
2
votes
4answers
655 views

“No worry” vs. “No worries”

I'm confused which one is correct. Do they have the same meaning? Or different in various contexts? Thanks!
4
votes
3answers
492 views

Therefore vs. wherefore [closed]

I saw these words in The Silmarillion: Then there was unrest among the Ainur; but Ilúvatar called to them, and said: ‘I know the desire of your minds that what ye have seen should verily be, not ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

gone vs. due (words refering to pregnancy)

You hear sentences like "How far gone is she?" Or "When is she due?" Used to talk about pregnancy... A few days ago one of my collegues used the sentence "How long is she due?" and insisted that it's ...
5
votes
2answers
164 views

Why “pastime” but not “passtime”?

pastime n. An activity that occupies one's spare time pleasantly: Sailing is her favorite pastime. [TFD] Etymonline says that it is from pass + time: late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

“Tickle Monster” vs. “Tickling Monster”

My small kids like tickling - we play a "Tickle Monster" game. I am wondering, is there any difference between word pairs like tickle monster vs. tickling monster tickle machine vs. tickling machine ...
1
vote
0answers
103 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
0
votes
3answers
169 views

Difference between “She is hot” and “Hot she is”? [closed]

Is there any difference on these two usages "She is hot" and "Hot she is" ??
2
votes
3answers
74 views

Expiry or expiration?

Do these 2 sentences have particular reasons? Could we use both? A. Not less than 30 days of the expiration. B. Not less than 30 days of the expiry date.
2
votes
2answers
94 views

the usage of “former”

You can say he's a former teacher, to refer to someone who used to be a teacher but not now. But can we say "your former teacher" to refer to "your last teacher"? Are the both the same or is there a ...
3
votes
2answers
226 views

Which rules define how to pronounce a consonant? [closed]

My question might appear silly and pointless to some, but I find it pretty interesting myself. If we look at the word 'circus', it has 3 consonants and 2 vowels. However, the 2 c in the words are ...
1
vote
2answers
112 views

What are the effects of word order in cause and effect sentences?

What are the differences between cause-and-effect sentences in which the causal agent precedes or follows its result? Both forms can be syntactically correct, but this question is concerned with their ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

In spite vs Out of spite

Do these two sentences below mean basically the same? He spoke out of spite. He spoke in spite. Would there be a nuance, what would it be? Thanks.
2
votes
3answers
324 views

wrinkle vs. crease

What is the difference between 'wrinkle' and 'crease' talking about skin? Can we say 'wrinkles' form as you get old, and 'creases' form when you move part of your face? Like when you laugh and laugh ...
1
vote
3answers
100 views

Difference between facilities and installations

If we are talking about electrical installations, when would you use "installations" vs "facilities". The Merriam Webster dictionary defines facilities as "something (such as a building or large ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

“More than necessary” vs. “more than are necessary”

Don't buy more books than are necessary. Don't buy more books than necessary. We have three more doctors than are necessary. We have three more doctors than necessary. ...