This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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-2
votes
1answer
40 views

What are the differences between listen to & start listening/I hope & I'm hoping? [closed]

I have two questions. The first question: What are the differences in meaning and grammar between "until you listen to me" and "until you start listening to me"? I'm hoping that someone can help me ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Are these two lines explaining the same time? [duplicate]

Are the sentences: "12 am (Midnight) Monday, March 14" and "It is due Monday at Midnight." referring to the same day, because the way they are worded makes it seem as though the first one ...
6
votes
4answers
354 views

“Not bad at all” vs. “Not at all bad”

What is the difference between the two? The weather is not bad at all. The weather is not at all bad.
1
vote
2answers
56 views

What is the difference between “cacao” and “cocoa”? [closed]

This has always made me confused. When I google it, the results seem confusing. For example, some of them says: Cocoa and cacao are kind of the same thing. They're also very different. What is ...
1
vote
3answers
104 views

Asymmetricity vs asymmetry, is there any difference in meaning or usage? [closed]

Is there any difference in meaning or usage between asymmetricity and asymmetry?
0
votes
2answers
204 views

Can I use “disactivate” instead of “deactivate”? [closed]

I was working with somebody else's source code and find them using the word “disactivate” in the code documentation as follows: disactivate the minor mode. The persistent action is to show help ...
1
vote
1answer
208 views

“Deposit” vs “down payment” vs “advance (payment)” [closed]

What is the difference? What context would I use them in? My native language only uses a single translation for all of these, afaik.
1
vote
1answer
61 views

“ Be alone ” vs “be lonely ” [closed]

I am alone. I am lonely. Do they have the same meaning? What is the difference between alone and lonely?
0
votes
1answer
78 views

“Speak loudly” vs “speak aloud” [closed]

People, speak loudly. People, speak aloud. These two sentences have the same meaning, don't they? What is the difference between loudly and aloud?
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Quieted versus quiesced

I've just seen a line of text warning of a systems upgrade that says: "...applications that utilize [the system] will be quieted on..." Leaving aside the -ize suffix on "utilize", I would have said ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is there any difference between 'to affiliate with' and 'to affiliate to'?

When I was looking up the word 'affiliate', the dictionary offered the example sentences which I've been really confused from. The actual meaning of the word 'affiliate' is to cause a group to ...
-1
votes
2answers
52 views

What is the difference between “As per” and “As for”? [closed]

What is the difference between "As per" and "As for"? As for our professional services or as per our professional services?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“Need” and “do need” [duplicate]

Is “need” different from “do need” in this sentence? However, you do need to create an action and associate it with the button, so that your app knows what to do when the button is pushed!
0
votes
0answers
16 views

What is the difference.? [duplicate]

What is the main difference between these 2 sentences ? I'm just about to have lunch. I'm doing lunch Thanks in advance. ..
1
vote
2answers
59 views

What is the difference between travel and travelling?

I would like to ask whether someone can explain the exact difference between 'travel' and 'travelling' to me. Some dictionaries say that travelling is an adjective but other dictionaries say that ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

What's the difference between “die from”, “die by” and “die of” [duplicate]

What's the difference between "died from", "died by" and "died of" in the following examples? died of an old age died by poison died from hypertension
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Are bilingual and fluent synonymous? [closed]

Do you think there is a difference between: I'm bilingual in English. I speak English fluently.
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Participating x participative [closed]

Is it possible to say that a person is 'participating'? E.g.: John is a participating student. Instead of: John is a participative student.
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Tired by waiting

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting Why Rudyard Kipling used the preposition "by"instead of "of"? What the difference?
5
votes
2answers
125 views

Less unhealthy vs. healthier

I was having a conversation with a friend regarding smoking cessation. After mentioning that I began using an e-cigarette, he referred to it as a "healthier" alternative. I refuted by stating that it ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Trump and Trumpery

Reading "Trumpery - A Twitter meme caused lookups to spike" on M-W got me wondering about Trump and Trumpery. I meant about the words itself and not about candidate Donald Trump's qualities. Trump ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Is there always a difference between 'is the' and 'is a'?

For instance, 'every dog owner is the friend of a dog owner' vs 'every dog owner is a friend of a dog owner'. For me, the former seems to imply that every dog owner is the friend of a particular dog ...
1
vote
1answer
128 views

Difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun?

What is the difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun? I am confused because the examples I found are quite similar. Noun clause in apposition to a ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

“Have ever eaten” or “Ever ate”

I'd like to express that the steak I had (last Sunday) was the best one I have ever eaten. Is "Have ever eaten" correct or do I have to use the past simple "I ever ate", since the process (of eating) ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is this sentence ambiguous? “For all subsets c, d belong to a, …”

I wrote a math practice question as For all subsets C, D belong to A, is it true..... What I meant was both C and D are the subsets of A. However, a student said what he understood is the ...
2
votes
3answers
68 views

Are “worth” and “value” interchangeable? [closed]

Say I was to describe someone (or something) as: "Having a lot of value". Could I also say: "Having a lot of worth" and mean the same thing? Edit, another example: "This document ...
5
votes
2answers
54 views

Why does the word “be” change so much?

In the phrase make <someone> {adjective}, it implies changing that person's emotion, but make <someone> be {adjective} implies forcing that person to comply. Why does the word "be", which ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

what are the differences among the storage things? [duplicate]

What are differences among wardrobe, cupboard, closet, drawer, cabinet and other terms used for objects in which things are stored? (I can't think of other terms right now.) For me wardrobe is only ...
5
votes
4answers
143 views

What's the difference between mar and spoil? [closed]

I would like to know if there is any difference between mar and spoil. It does not seem to have any difference, but I would like to know which one is more used, which is more formal and informal, and ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

state and country [duplicate]

What's the difference between "state" and "country" Why is it the Arab states but some Asian countries? Are the two words interchageble?
1
vote
6answers
123 views

“Cost” vs “expense” — a usage question

While editing some ad copy, and I was given the sentence, "Defending a lawsuit can be a big cost for your business." (My italics.) I keep thinking the proper word to use is "expense" rather than ...
3
votes
2answers
78 views

Difference between “prima facie” and “preliminary” evidence

I came across many sentences in empirical economics papers using the term: prima facie evidence Is there any difference between "prima facie" evidence and "preliminary evidence"?
1
vote
4answers
103 views

The difference between “would” and “used to”

Is it correct to say: I worked at a software company and I would sell different programs. To me, would does not sound appropriate here for past habits. Is selling considered a state like work ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Meaning of “Students in all majors” versus “Students of all majors”

I would like to know the difference between these sentences: I want to send an email to students of all majors I want to send an email to students in all majors How did of/in change the meaning of ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Need help with formation of this title

I am going to write my bachelor paper about how I am going to extend CASE tool transformation of integrity constrains from logical model to physical schema. I am not sure if it is relevant, but my ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Use of “skill” and “competence/competency” in specific scenario

To me, skills are something related to mechanical performance. Someone is very skilled at playing football, for instance. Competence/competency on the other hand is more related to knowledge. ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Aramean vs. Aramaic?

What is the difference in usage between the adjectives Aramean and Aramaic? It seems that we use Aramaic to describe the language and Aramean to describe the people. But which one should we use to ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Semantics of 'the extent which' vs 'the extent TO which'

'the extent which'    vs    2. 'the extent to which' : 3. Semantically, how do these compare? I know that to is a preposition and so a Functional Morpheme, but does 'to' affect anything ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Is “crazy” a noun?

The traditional grammar taught us that only noun, noun phrase or its equivalent, e.g., to infinitive or gerund (in traditional grammatical sense) could be a subject of a sentence. Now, I watched a ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

The difference between ''cringy'' and ''cringey'' [closed]

Can anyone explain to me the difference between these two words? I looked up them in a dictionary but I find the both meanings to be quite similar. Also, is there any difference in their ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

OUT OF BREATH v.s BREATHLESS

What is the difference between 'out of breath' and 'breathless'? I have read the dictionary carefully. I saw an example is that:" We were out of breath after only five minutes''. And 'out of breath' ...
0
votes
2answers
114 views
1
vote
1answer
57 views

What is the difference between “ago” and “before”? [closed]

What is the difference between ago and before when they are both used as adverbs in the following sentences: I saw him seven days ago. and I had seen him seven days before.
1
vote
2answers
148 views

What's the difference between “imply” and “hint”? [closed]

I have a question. What's the difference between these two words, imply and hint? They seem to have the same meaning in definition and if they actually mean the same, which one of them is more ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Using “across” after preposition “to”?

English is not my first language, and I often lose my confidence when I use across in my sentence. Could you please give me an advice on the sentence that I have written below? Health education ...
1
vote
3answers
102 views

I have never understood a word Alice “has said” or “said” [duplicate]

I am not sure about the use of present perfect in the subordinate clause. I want to say I've never understood Alice for as long as I've known her, so should I use the present perfect aspect in the ...
1
vote
1answer
179 views

What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”? [closed]

I found this link explained the difference between "etiquette" and "courtesy", as following the rules and being kind to others. The answer regarded "etiquette" is similar with "manners" If this ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

“He is the instructor for this class” or “of this class”? Does the first one means he is the right person for this class?

I am new here and glad to join this site..It find it very instructive. Are these statements correct? In what context do we use them? He is the instructor for this class==> Does it mean: He is the ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Affect or Effect? [closed]

I still don't really know, despite trying to read the definitions. I believe this sentence is correct but let me know. I seriously wish I could foresee the future and know of all the different ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Difference between “should”, “would” and “ought to” [closed]

The sentence: It's essential that the documents should be destroyed immediately. Why can't ought to be used in place of should and why can't I go for would?