This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2answers
9k views

“If/as/when necessary”

Is there any difference between the following sentences? Please press the bell if necessary. Please press the bell as necessary. Please press the bell when necessary.
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1answer
4k views

Is there a difference between “assistant manager” and “manager assistant”?

Would a switch of the word 'assistant' and 'manager' cause differences in a universal corporate context? In my opinion, assistant manager is just a rank below a manager. This seems to apply to ...
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2answers
3k views

Difference between “Coming weekend” and “This weekend”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Next Friday” vs. “This Friday” Consider the following statements: I'll meet you coming wednesday I'll meet you next wednesday I'll ...
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3answers
112 views

“Had entries” or “had an entry”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: "Only those who qualify will be awarded a certificate" or "Only those who qualify will be awarded certificates"? In this question, there is a part ...
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1answer
4k views

What's the difference between a “delegator” and “delegatee”? [closed]

I've seen both delegator and delegatee used interchangeably and it always leaves me ambivalent to which is correct. It would be nice if some could point out the difference, and an example would also ...
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2answers
3k views

“shall” vs. “will” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'shall' and 'will' Is there any difference at all between these two sentences? What will we talk about? What shall we talk about?
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2answers
519 views

Where to use these words exactly: “simple,” “simplicity”

I just want to know how to use these words and in which context: simple and simplicity.
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1answer
86 views

“Observe” vs. “oversee”

The operator of a machine solely needs to be in control of the machine controls. Thus, they need to be physically in a location near the control panel, and in order to make sure nobody else pushes the ...
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3answers
2k views

Difference between “abase” and “abash”

It seems as if both words mean to humiliate and degrade?
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3answers
5k views

“It could/might/may be funny” — what is the correct usage?

What is the difference in meaning in these three sentences? it might be funny it could be funny it may be funny The answer was partially touched on in this post.
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2answers
86 views

Sun 'goes down' or 'comes down'?

A couple months ago I read a book with the statement When the sun goes down and today in a movie I saw the man said Let's wait for the sun to come down. I believe both are refering to the sunset. ...
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2answers
63 views

“Dream of” vs. “dream about”

What is the difference between the usage of dream of and dream about? For example, I dream of becoming a doctor. I dream about becoming a doctor. I dream of going to places. I dream about ...
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2answers
102 views

“A and B both are” vs. “A and B are both” vs. “Both A and B are” vs. “Both of A and B are”?

A and B both are very good; A and B are both very good. Both A and B are very good. Both of A and B are very good. Are there subtle differences between the four sentences above?
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2answers
216 views

What's the difference between phonograph and gramophone?

I've been reading about the Grammy award, and found that it was named after the invention of Emile Berliner, the gramophone, after considering the name Eddie (for the phonograph's inventor, Thomas ...
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2answers
129 views

Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage

During a trip to the US I realised that many Americans have never heard the word cutlery before ... however some have. Where in the English speaking world (and in particular where in the US) is this ...
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4answers
124 views

Do we ask a waiter if we could have or get?

I have noticed a tendency among the younger generation, when ordering in a pub or restaurant, to say 'Please could I get beer-battered cod and chips', whereas I would and do say 'Please could I have ...
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2answers
130 views

“Before it was too late” vs. “before it would be too late”

What is the difference between the sentences below? Mary decided to get pregnant before it was too late. Mary decided to get pregnant before it would be too late.
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1answer
105 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I ...
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2answers
487 views

Difference between “about” and “Around”

What is the difference between "about" and "around" in following example ? I'll see you around 6 O'clock. I'll see you about 6 O'clock. Now, I usually the first one, but I heard the second one on ...
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2answers
401 views

Difference between 'have to' and 'will have to' [closed]

Is there any difference between these two statements. If yes could you tell me when to use them. I have to do that I will have to do that
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1answer
210 views

Hairdo and Haircut

What is the difference in meaning between "Hairdo" and "Haircut"? In the dictionary into my native language it is written that "hairdo" must be used according to women. Does it mean that "haircut" ...
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2answers
207 views

Is 'Mochup' the same as 'Mock-up'?

I recently came across the word 'mochup'. I am unsure if this is simply a spelling mistake of the term 'mock-up', or if it is a technical neologism with a slightly different meaning. Searching on ...
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2answers
125 views

To worry about vs To be worried about - difference

Which one of the following is recommended to be used, and what is the difference between both of them? You do not have to worry about anything. Or You do not have to be worried about ...
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1answer
170 views

What is the scope of using shelved, postponed, adjourned, put off?

postponed shelved adjourned put off Exactly as in this question, I have a problem with choosing the scope of using those synonyms of postponed. What is the scope of using each of them?
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2answers
103 views

Difference between “Knock it off!” and “Drop it!”

What is the difference between "Knock it off!" and "Drop it!". I do translate both as "Stop it". Is there any context-based usage difference? Thank you.
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1answer
950 views

Difference in pronunciation between “won't” and “want” [closed]

Which is the difference in pronunciation between "won't" and "want"?
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3answers
369 views

Usage difference between modest vs decent?

The Dictionary definitions are below: Modest = not excessively large, elaborate, or expensive. Decent = appropriate; fitting Please consider below sentences He has a modest three ...
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3answers
678 views

Usage differences between “than”, “to”, and “over”

I understand that than, rather than, over and to are used to compare things. How ever I am not sure when to use those for specific scenarios. Are these interchangeable? Consider the sentence below: ...
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2answers
355 views

Can “supposed to” be used to mean “considered to”?

I have a question regarding expressions like these: The new Al Pacino movie is supposed to be a good movie. Asians are not supposed to be good ball players. Whale is supposed to be the smartest ...
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1answer
173 views

“Clod” vs. “chunk” vs. “lump”

Are there usage differences between clod, chunk, and lump? Are they interchangeable? For example, is it better to use lump or clod for wood?
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3answers
1k views

What's the difference between “get up” and “stand up”?

I'm translating Bob Marley's song "Get up, stand up" and, consulting my dictionary, I can't understand the difference between these two verbs. I have understood the overall meaning of this song, of ...
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1answer
20k views

What is the difference between “accounting” and “accountancy”?

Is there a difference between the words "accounting" or "accountancy", when referring to the field or branch of study? Could one or the other be said to be a subfield within the other? Are there any ...
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3answers
279 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the distinction between terms 'where', 'while', 'whereas' and 'whenever'? [closed]

It seems all of these four words can denote 'at the same time' or 'if and only if', but do the meanings of them identical? Update: e.g. Day comes where the sun rises. Day comes whereas the sun ...
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2answers
807 views

What's the difference between these terms: old-fashioned, out of fashion,unfashionable and outdated?

What’s the difference between old-fashioned, out of fashion, unfashionable and outdated? She wears old-fashioned clothes. She wears unfashionable clothes. She wears outdated clothes. The clothes she ...
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1answer
650 views

What is the difference between “task” and “assignment”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Task, project, assignment, job. Which one is correct in my case? These words don't have exact matches in Portuguese, so sometimes I get confused about their usage. When ...
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2answers
8k views

Difference between “mastery”, “proficiency” and “familiarity”

What is the difference between mastery, proficiency and familiarity? I know they all refer to the level of understanding or skill in something. I've seen the words in these contexts: mastery: in ...
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1answer
101 views

“Comparison between” versus “comparison for” [closed]

What's the difference between "comparison between" and "comparison for"?
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1answer
813 views

Mixing British and American spellings in writing [closed]

I like color more than colour, but I like favourite more than favorite. For me it is better to write My favourite color is blue. Is it wrong to mix British and American spellings in writing, and ...
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1answer
5k views

What's the difference between “rise” and “arise”

What is the difference between rise and arise? When and how should I use each one? Note: similar question
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2answers
881 views

Add-in, addin, add-on, addon

For example, Firefox uses add-ons whereas Microsoft Office uses add-ins. I've seen all 4 versions (add-in, addin, add-on, addon) used in various software programs, but I wonder if all of them are ...
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2answers
201 views

“Certify” vs. “certificate” [closed]

As verbs, what are the differences and relation between certify and certificate? For example, in human resources, why is it effort certify not effort certificate?
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2answers
423 views

“I'm just like anyone else” or “I am not like other people”?

I am translating a Russian phrase, original meaning of which was: I am the same as all other people. A suggested translation is: I'm just like anyone else. I think it should be: I ...
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2answers
2k views

“Leave” vs. “Go”

From this question, I was just wondering, what is the difference between "leave" and "go" in terms of the same definition of "departing", and when do we use one, but not the other. For example, which ...
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3answers
169 views

What is the difference between “Height” and “Summit”؟

What is the difference between "Height" and "Summit"?
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “what do you think” and “how about”?

These two sentences seem to be the same to me. Is there any difference between them, and are there circumstances in which I can only use one of them instead of the other?
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2answers
590 views

What is the difference between a command and an invitation?

What is the difference between a command and an invitation? Both seem to be directed to elicit an action. Are there structural differences between the two?
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between “been” and “being”?

What is the difference between been and being?
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1answer
1k views

Difference between 'sentimental' and 'emotional'?

What is the difference between the terms 'sentimental' and 'emotional'?
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1answer
825 views

Difference between “kinds of books”, “kinds of book”, “kind of books”

I want to know the difference between the usage of "kinds of books", "kinds of book", and "kind of books".