This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2answers
370 views

“Compared with it”, is it correct?

Consider the following sentence: We consider a simple protocol as the base configuration and compare with it three other cases. Which one is more correct, "compare with it" or "compare it ...
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2answers
305 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

Is there any difference between these sentences apart from structure? The tiger is a ferocious animal. Tigers are ferocious animals.
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3answers
206 views

“When X is” or “When X will be”?

I always have a tough time with this. Suppose the following: The software will be installed when the computer is ready. versus The software will be installed when the computer will be ready. ...
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3answers
572 views

“indulger of” vs. “indulger in”

A person can indulge in something. Is he therefore an indulger of something or an indulger in something? Are both okay? If both are okay, is there any difference between these two phrases or are ...
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2answers
3k views

What are differences of meaning among device, gadget, gimmick and gizmo?

Further to today's my question about the words, 'off-the-shelf' used in Time Magazine's feature story titled 'The Best 50 Invention of The Year' (Nov. 11th 2010 Issue), I found the following sentence ...
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3answers
1k views

Difference in meaning and prononciation of urbane and urban

I encounter these two words pretty often, both orally and in writing. What is the difference between two, and how to pronounce, say in USA?
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1answer
797 views

How is “admire” used in “to admire them a great deal”?

I knew that admire can be used in phrases like "admire somebody" or "admire somebody for something", but recently I have found the following sentence in my Collins dictionary: If you emulate ...
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1answer
123 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
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2answers
2k views

Difference between nouns “strip” and “stripe”

Is there a specific difference between the nouns "strip" and "stripe", especially in the context of "a strip(e) of paper"? Are both equivalent or do they carry specific meanings?
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1answer
2k views

“Can not” vs. “cannot” [duplicate]

Is there a difference in meaning and/or connotation between "can not" and "cannot"? I have read and seen both used interchangeably, but I know people who argue for a slight difference in meaning. ...
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2answers
250 views

sensible, sensitive, and sentient

Despite the apparently same meanings of the three words (which I looked up in Wiktionary), I would like to know if my interpretation is correct regarding their differences. "sensible" is used to ...
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2answers
6k views

Morrow vs. Tomorrow [closed]

What's the difference between morrow and tomorrow? Why are there two similar words for the same meaning? I noticed it in the title of a song of Michael Nyman, "Second Morrow", on Gattaca OST. ...
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1answer
165 views

Symphonic vs. symphony

Is there any clear line between a symphony and symphonic? For long, I thought that a symphony was simply a "song" played by a symphonic orchestra. Then I realized that more often than not, the ...
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3answers
5k views

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference? [closed]

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference when they mean the total length of the boundary of a two-dimensional geometric shape?
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between teaches “at” and “in” xxx university [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”? “In college” versus “at college” versus ...
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1answer
2k views

Difference between “mad” and “angry” [closed]

Are there any differences between mad and angry and when should you use one instead of the other?
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4answers
408 views

“Existence” in English and Persian

In Persian, things "have" existence, for example To vojod dari = You have existence In English existing is not something to have, it's something to be, You exist Am I wrong in saying ...
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2answers
1k views

Difference between “leverage” and “utilize”

Sooner or later, you want to leverage Zend_Application better by creating your own resource plugins. Can leverage above be replaced by utilize?
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2answers
6k views

Difference between “yup” and “yes” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Yes”, “Yeah”, “Yep” What is the difference between yup and yes? Most of the time I use yup instead of yes.
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2answers
153 views

“Principal” or “principle”

What is the difference between principal and principle? I frequently come across these words and get confused.
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2answers
221 views

Arrange, settle, reconcile — could these words be used before “their differences”?

Arrange, settle, reconcile — could these words be used before "their differences"? What are the differences in meaning?
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2answers
399 views

What's the difference between 'collision' and 'conflict'?

What's the difference between 'collision' and 'conflict'? In SQL language, should I say 'PK collision' or 'PK conflict'?
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2answers
3k views

Is it acceptable to say “more [adjective]” when there is already a dedicated form making “more” unnecessary (e.g. “angrier” vs. “more angry”)?

For years, it irritated me that people kept using "more [adjective]" where there were already dedicated forms making "more" unnecessary. For example, people would say "more tight" than "tighter". I ...
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2answers
70 views

Terminology vs jargon vs lexicon

Though this subject is somewhat discussed here; what are the differences? From Merriam-Webster online: Jargon: The technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group. ...
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2answers
2k views

What's the difference between “dissatisfied” and “unsatisfied”?

Is there a clear-cut difference between dissatisfied and unsatisfied?
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2answers
42 views

“archival” versus “archivable”/“archiveable”

What is the difference between archival and archivable? Archival appears to be an acceptable word among official sources, whereas archivable/archiveable does not appear to be a valid entry. Is the ...
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2answers
832 views

What is the difference between fog, mist and haze?

So, as the question says by itself: what's the context when I should use the word mist and the right context for fog? And haze?
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2answers
578 views

What is the difference between a variant and a variation?

I designed a logo for a client. He liked the idea it presented, but wanted to see alternative ways to represent its idea, so I came up with several new designs of similar concept. I now have to ...
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1answer
93 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
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1answer
75 views

Windbag vs. demagogue

I was told that a person who delivers long speeches but no information is called a windbag. A demagogue is a political leader who represents popular tendencies (it has a negative color likewise we do ...
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2answers
309 views

What is the difference between “scream” and “shriek”?

I’m now curious because while I was updating the Wikipedia page for Onomatopoeias, I saw two different sets of sounds for scream and shriek. The sounds listed under these two sections seem to overlap. ...
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1answer
121 views

Is there a difference between “to air” and “to broadcast”?

What is the difference, if any, in the use of the verbs to air and to broadcast?
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3answers
387 views

difference between act and deed

I've been searching the internet, but have not quite found a satisfactory explanation between an act and a deed. Both seem to have kind of a meaning of something done, though through my google and ...
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2answers
161 views

“Prodigal” vs. “spendthrift”

What are the differences between the words prodigal and spendthrift? They seem to mean the same. When does one choose to use one over the other?
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1answer
114 views

what is the term when the kingdom ruler changes through an assassination

In the ancient times ,there was periods they changes the ruler of a kingdom or empire by assassination him . what do we call that? changing the king in a quick time through assassination? do we call ...
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1answer
667 views

A number off or a number of?

I am reading some technical documents and there is a list of items that make up the product. Throughout the document where there are multiple items, they are listed as 2 off, 3 off and so on. For ...
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2answers
197 views

“number of books” or “book count”?

The number of books is nine. The book count is nine. Which is more natural? What's the SUBTLE difference between them?
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2answers
2k views

“I love you for who you are” vs. “I love you as you are” vs. “I love you for what you are” [closed]

I love you for who you are. I came across the line from a BBC Radio’s drama, and wondered what’s the difference from saying “I love you as you are,” or “I love you for what you are.” Would you ...
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2answers
2k views

“Atop” versus “on top of” [closed]

I'm sure this is silly and won't be terribly difficult to answer: can one climb atop a mountain or is it proper to say climb on top of. Or does it matter? I'm thinking the latter is correct.
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2answers
220 views

“types of data” vs. “data types” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Data source types” vs. “types of data sources” Please can you tell me that what the difference is between "types of data" and "data types". Are they the same? For ...
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4answers
2k views

What is the difference between “stiff” and “rigid”?

Could an object be stiff but not rigid or vice versa? When is each one used? And what is the opposite of each of them?
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1answer
1k views

“All X” vs. “all of X” vs. “all the X”

Is there any difference between "all X", "all of the X", "all the X"? E.g., all friends all of the friends all the friends
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1answer
473 views

“Take a look at” vs. “look at” [closed]

I am not a native speaker. Could you please explain the difference between the phrases "take a look at" and "look at"? For example: Take a look at this issue. Look at this issue. What ...
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3answers
162 views

“To like for somebody/something to be something” vs. “to like somebody/something to be something”

Is there any difference between "To like for somebody/something to be something" vs. "to like somebody/something to be something"? In the following case there seems to be a difference, because the ...
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2answers
2k views

Difference between ''He wishes it didn't…'' and ''He wishes it wouldn't…''

I was teaching first and second conditionals to an intermediate English class the other day, and then we started with 'wish' statements. We talked about famous people and their wishes. For example: ...
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1answer
913 views

Is “payless” synonym of “free”?

Does "payless" mean "for zero price", and "free" (as in beer)? I searched the dictionaries but could not find the word. I also wonder whether "cost-free" means the same.
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2answers
10k views

“If/as/when necessary”

Is there any difference between the following sentences? Please press the bell if necessary. Please press the bell as necessary. Please press the bell when necessary.
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1answer
4k views

Is there a difference between “assistant manager” and “manager assistant”?

Would a switch of the word 'assistant' and 'manager' cause differences in a universal corporate context? In my opinion, assistant manager is just a rank below a manager. This seems to apply to ...
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2answers
4k views

Difference between “Coming weekend” and “This weekend”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Next Friday” vs. “This Friday” Consider the following statements: I'll meet you coming wednesday I'll meet you next wednesday I'll ...
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3answers
114 views

“Had entries” or “had an entry”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: "Only those who qualify will be awarded a certificate" or "Only those who qualify will be awarded certificates"? In this question, there is a part ...