This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2
votes
2answers
680 views

The differences among: deliver, ship, and transmit

Are these definitions correct? Delivered: The package has arrived at your place. Shipped: The package was just sent. Which word can be used to describe that the package is on its way? ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between 'framework curriculum' and 'curricular framework'?

I know that curricular is an adjective and curriculum a noun, but are they both used in exactly the same meaning? Or are there some differences concerning what they imply or apply to? Being a ...
2
votes
1answer
23k views

“I don't know nothing” vs “I don't know anything” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a rule about double negations that aren't meant as double negations (e.g. “We don't need no education”)? Double negation   I'm not a native ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between Guise and Disguise [closed]

What is the difference between Guise and Disguise? They sound like antonym word for each other, but they aren't!
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between disseminate and distribute

The original confusion arose when I read the following sentence. --> you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication, or any of its contents, is strictly ...
2
votes
1answer
484 views

Difference between a 'medicine' and a 'medicinal'

What is the exact difference between the words "medicine" and "medicinal"? For medicinal, Free Dictionary states: "A preparation or product having the properties of a medicine." But the fact ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

“would like you to” vs. “please”

I am writing an email, in which I would like to ask for something but I don't want to be very direct. I came up with the following two constructions: In addition, I will not be receiving my ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

Difference between “mythical” and “mythological”

What is the difference between "mythical" and "mythological"? I find these two interchangeable. Also, please give some examples.
2
votes
1answer
358 views

“Learn to code” vs. “Learn coding”

Is there a semantic difference between learn to code and learn coding? Can both forms be used interchangeably?
2
votes
2answers
976 views

'All that' vs 'all what' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “all that” vs. “all what” How can I be sure when to use 'all that' or 'all what' in making sentences. Is there any differences in their meaning. ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

Unions' Assassins' Guild or Union's Assassins' Guild?

Is it Unions' Assassins' Guild or Union's Assassins' Guild? If my English serves me, I think both are right but have slightly different meanings. Can someone shed some light?
2
votes
2answers
914 views

Are there differences between “all-day lunch” and “all day lunch”?

What are the differences between: All-day lunch All day lunch for example: all-day lunch from 12.00-18.00 The dictionary say all-day means available throughout the day, but is the hyphen ...
2
votes
1answer
613 views

Usage of “contributive” vs. “contributory”

Which of the two is more correct? contributory capacity or contributive capacity (referred to the capacity of a province in ancient Mesopotamia to contribute to state demand for foodstuffs)
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “utter” and “speak”?

E.g. speak vehemently utter vehemently When should one use speak and when utter?
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Differences between “vulgar” and “coarse”, “crass”, “crude”, “rough”, “rude”, “unrefined” as applied to language

This question specifically covers how these terms are used to describe language, it is a followup to What's the difference between "informal", "colloquial", "slang", ...
2
votes
3answers
10k views

What is the difference, if any, between 'art', 'the arts', and 'Art'?

In answer to this question, there was some discussion about whether these two sentences are equivalent: Art nurtures the soul. The arts nurture the soul. Are they equivalent? 'The arts' is ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“aware” vs “know”

What is the difference between aware and know?
2
votes
2answers
208 views

“For every day” vs. “with every day”

Consider (…) and they were getting stronger with/for every day What's the difference/the correct one to use?
2
votes
2answers
16k views

What are the differences between 'offer', 'propose', and 'suggest'?

What are the differences between offer, propose, and suggest?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between “magnitude” and “multitude”

What is the difference between magnitude and multitude? Quantity is a kind of property which exists as magnitude or multitude.
2
votes
1answer
152 views

“Inconsequent” and “inconsequential”

What is the difference between "inconsequent" and "inconsequential"?
2
votes
3answers
240 views

What is the difference between “match” ,“suit” and “fit” [closed]

Could you tell me what is the difference between match, suit and fit. I know their usage for clothes (color,size e.t.c.), but I'm wondering about other cases. For example: When your skills don't ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

What is the difference between “fitness” and “suitability”?

I apologize if this is an obvious question, but I have not been able to find the answer in a dictionary. The specific problem I'm having is distinguishing between [certificate] which certifies ...
2
votes
3answers
143 views

I can make it, I will leave. What's the precedence and ambiguity?

Here's a scenario. I am confounded when after a discussion with a friend, they arrive at my place on Saturday, here's the transcript. her: I can make it on Saturday. me: Ok, see you then anytime! ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

outside vs out of the box [duplicate]

As a non native english speaker i wonder which one is the correct form to use ? to think outside the box ? to think out of the box ? is there any difference in meaning ?
2
votes
1answer
75 views

This might turn out unnecessary vs This might turn out to be unnecessary

Which of the two expressions is correct? Is there any difference
2
votes
3answers
140 views

Expiry or expiration?

Do these 2 sentences have particular reasons? Could we use both? A. Not less than 30 days of the expiration. B. Not less than 30 days of the expiry date.
2
votes
1answer
566 views

end up doing something VS. end up with doing something VS. end up in doing something

What is the difference between: end up with doing something end up in doing something and simply end up doing something Here is the context that triggered the question for me: The net ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

GRE Question. Why was 'reinforce' the incorrect answer in “the notes mimics/reflects/reinforces the meaning”?

From Kaplan's GRE Premier book, 2014, p. 105: Word Painting is a musical technique in which the progression of the notes ______ the meaning of the lyrics; a famous example of this can be found ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

different meanings of 'number'

My motherlanguage is german, in german there are several words for slightly different meanings of the term number, or do I just not know their english counterparts? Examples: German term Ziffer: ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

what is the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust [closed]

I looked at dictionary but i couldn't understand the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust with simple examples please
2
votes
1answer
940 views

“In no way” vs “By no means”

How do I decide whether I should use "in no way" or "by no means"? Are they different in any way? Should either of these terms be used at all? For example: In no way am I suggesting that... ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

How do you call a thing that raises something (e.g. an event)?

Let's say I want to describe event model in some software. Conceptually there are two sides: the one which raises an event and another which receives it. While I do know the difference between to ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

“An exclamation” or “An ejaculation” ? Are these words synonymous? [closed]

Exclamations and ejaculations are usually expressions of surprise or anxiety, something said quickly and suddenly. Grammatically they are always interjections and may seem to be the same kind of ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

What are the differences between “seems not” and “doesn't seem”?

Are the following sentences correct? He seems not to want to help us and He seems want to help us. Is it correct if I use "seem" in a negative sentence? Which role does "seem" play? ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Analyst vs analyzer/analyser?

What are the scenarios where the meanings of these differ? What is the difference between their meanings and if any, why? I have observed that the term 'analyst' is specifically used in cases of ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Can “cloven” be used instead of “cleaved”?

Can cloven be used in its verb form like the way broken or eaten is used? gets cloven to give rise to is cloven by Cleaved is a perfectly fine word in this context, but can cloven be used ...
2
votes
2answers
459 views

Confused about When to Use “these” and “those” [duplicate]

Example #1 This site contains links to books that I read. I recommend these/those books. NOTE: The links are on this site, but not on this page. The links are external links. Should I use ...
2
votes
1answer
14k views

“Take account of” vs. “take into account”

Is there any difference in meaning between: take account of take into account Or do they both mean "to take into consideration"?
2
votes
2answers
414 views

difference between apt and fit

Question I'm particularly interested in the meaning of apt, but while I was searching through some dictionaries and examples it struck me how close the words apt and fit seem to be. Thus: what ...
2
votes
2answers
9k views

“As I said” vs. “Like I said”

I was told that saying Like I said isn't grammatically correct although it is used a lot. That we should use As I said instead. Is it true?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Comical” v. “Comedic”

Is there any semantic distinction between the words comedic and comical? I usually use the former to describe people and the latter to describe things, situations, etc.
2
votes
2answers
26k views

Difference between contract and catch [a disease]

What could be the difference between contracting a disease and catching a disease? I know there isn't any big difference. However, it looks like there are some diseases you can both catch and ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “bush” and “shrub”?

What's the difference between "bush" and "shrub"? Are these absolute synonyms?
2
votes
2answers
15k views

“I hoped” vs. “I was hoping”. What's the difference?

I can't remember to hear "I hoped..." in any movie I've watched. I always hear "I was hoping..." when people talk. Nevertheless I know both forms are correct in terms of grammar. So when "I hoped" is ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Difference between “architecture” and “structure” in the context of software

In the software industry, we call a step to building a software "architecture". I always take "architecture" as "structure". So for me, software architecture = software structure. Is that right?
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is there any real difference between “to” as a preposition and “to” as an adverb?

I'm really in doubt. On the free dictionary I read this concept of "to" as a preposition: "1. (used for expressing motion or direction toward a place, person, or thing approached and reached): Come to ...
2
votes
4answers
486 views

Conjunction Puzzle: Is this clause dependent or independent?

Third grade teacher here. I plan to teach students to distinguish between simple, compound and complex sentences — but only if I can demonstrate a clear and meaningful difference between the latter ...
2
votes
2answers
604 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...