This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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1answer
82 views

GRE Question. Why was 'reinforce' the incorrect answer in “the notes mimics/reflects/reinforces the meaning”?

From Kaplan's GRE Premier book, 2014, p. 105: Word Painting is a musical technique in which the progression of the notes ______ the meaning of the lyrics; a famous example of this can be found ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

different meanings of 'number'

My motherlanguage is german, in german there are several words for slightly different meanings of the term number, or do I just not know their english counterparts? Examples: German term Ziffer: ...
2
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1answer
1k views

what is the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust [closed]

I looked at dictionary but i couldn't understand the difference between charity/foundation/cause/trust with simple examples please
2
votes
1answer
94 views

How do you call a thing that raises something (e.g. an event)?

Let's say I want to describe event model in some software. Conceptually there are two sides: the one which raises an event and another which receives it. While I do know the difference between to ...
2
votes
2answers
162 views

“An exclamation” or “An ejaculation” ? Are these words synonymous? [closed]

Exclamations and ejaculations are usually expressions of surprise or anxiety, something said quickly and suddenly. Grammatically they are always interjections and may seem to be the same kind of ...
2
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2answers
4k views

What are the differences between “seems not” and “doesn't seem”?

Are the following sentences correct? He seems not to want to help us and He seems want to help us. Is it correct if I use "seem" in a negative sentence? Which role does "seem" play? ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Analyst vs analyzer/analyser?

What are the scenarios where the meanings of these differ? What is the difference between their meanings and if any, why? I have observed that the term 'analyst' is specifically used in cases of ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Can “cloven” be used instead of “cleaved”?

Can cloven be used in its verb form like the way broken or eaten is used? gets cloven to give rise to is cloven by Cleaved is a perfectly fine word in this context, but can cloven be used ...
2
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2answers
420 views

Confused about When to Use “these” and “those” [duplicate]

Example #1 This site contains links to books that I read. I recommend these/those books. NOTE: The links are on this site, but not on this page. The links are external links. Should I use ...
2
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1answer
12k views

“Take account of” vs. “take into account”

Is there any difference in meaning between: take account of take into account Or do they both mean "to take into consideration"?
2
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2answers
362 views

difference between apt and fit

Question I'm particularly interested in the meaning of apt, but while I was searching through some dictionaries and examples it struck me how close the words apt and fit seem to be. Thus: what ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“As I said” vs. “Like I said”

I was told that saying Like I said isn't grammatically correct although it is used a lot. That we should use As I said instead. Is it true?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Comical” v. “Comedic”

Is there any semantic distinction between the words comedic and comical? I usually use the former to describe people and the latter to describe things, situations, etc.
2
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2answers
23k views

Difference between contract and catch [a disease]

What could be the difference between contracting a disease and catching a disease? I know there isn't any big difference. However, it looks like there are some diseases you can both catch and ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

“I hoped” vs. “I was hoping”. What's the difference?

I can't remember to hear "I hoped..." in any movie I've watched. I always hear "I was hoping..." when people talk. Nevertheless I know both forms are correct in terms of grammar. So when "I hoped" is ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Difference between “architecture” and “structure” in the context of software

In the software industry, we call a step to building a software "architecture". I always take "architecture" as "structure". So for me, software architecture = software structure. Is that right?
2
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1answer
3k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
2
votes
4answers
451 views

Conjunction Puzzle: Is this clause dependent or independent?

Third grade teacher here. I plan to teach students to distinguish between simple, compound and complex sentences — but only if I can demonstrate a clear and meaningful difference between the latter ...
2
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3answers
3k views

What is the difference between “simulate” and “emulate”?

The words clearly have a similar meaning. But I think there must be a subtle difference. e.g. You get a "flight simulator", but an "ipad emulator". Both are pieces of software for replicating the ...
2
votes
2answers
581 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
2
votes
2answers
168 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

deceit vs deception

There seems to be a boundary between these concepts, but I can't quite work out where it is. Camouflage and mimicry are deceptions; telling untruths is deceitful. In common usage we would say, 'The ...
2
votes
1answer
379 views

dependent vs dependant

I find so many different "rules" on the internet that it is really hard to understand when to use these words: dependent and dependant. In the below examples, what would you pick and why: a) "Your ...
2
votes
2answers
661 views

What/How is the time?

The farmyard was deserted. Dieter had gone down the lane with Rupert and Nialla to the river, and by now they had probably already made camp. If I was lucky, I might be just in time for a cup ...
2
votes
1answer
10k views

What is the difference between “synergistic” and “synergetic”?

What is the difference between "synergistic" and "synergetic"? I believe they both speak of the cooperation of multiple things to produce an output, but how do they differ?
2
votes
2answers
248 views

'Whack someone“ vs ” Whop someone“ vs ”Wallop someone"

I noticed that, in the dictionary, the words Whack, Whop and Wallop can have a meaning resembling hit some one hard. ODO says: Whack (Verb) = strike forcefully with a sharp blow. Whop (Verb) = ...
2
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4answers
504 views

“To latch in a recess/groove” vs. “to catch in a recess/groove”

Is there a difference in meaning when used in a technical context? For example, does a fork latch in a recess when pressed or does it catch in the recess?
2
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1answer
229 views

Information that the reports can work 'off' or 'of' [closed]

Should it be Last years data set contains information that the reports can work off or Last years data set contains information that the reports can work of ?
2
votes
1answer
604 views

“Advertising” vs. “Advertisement” in US political commercials

This is the first year I noticed the verbal boilerplate at the end of US political commercials states: Group X is responsible for the content of this advertising. compared to what I recall (and ...
2
votes
3answers
16k views

Difference between “explain” and “describe” [closed]

What is the difference between "explain" and "describe"? When to use one over the other?
2
votes
2answers
309 views

How to rephrase the term “physical sciences”? [closed]

A distinction is often made in the natural sciences between the life sciences and the physical sciences. Semantically, I believe this is a false distinction. Since all life depends on a physical ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Difference between “to posit” and “to postulate”

What exactly is the difference in meaning between the two words posit and postulate, besides the fact that the latter one is also used as a noun? Both words are formal and their definition are ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

The difference between “look at” and “see”

What is the difference between look at and see? For example: Can I look at it? Can I see it? Let's go to look at him. Let's go to see him.
2
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1answer
1k views

Proper use of “context” in a phrase

Which of the following phrases is correct? Everything is in some context. or Everything has some context.
2
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1answer
193 views

“At the Passing” Or “On the Passing”

Steve Ballmer writes: “I want to express my deepest condolences at the passing of Steve Jobs, one of the founders of our industry and a true visionary. My heart goes out to his family, everyone at ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does “fare” apply to non-persons?

If one pays for transportation of oneself a fare has been paid. What is paid if the transportation is of a non-person object (a parcel, a letter, a vegetable, a box of rocks)?
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What's the difference between a graph, a chart, and a plot?

A graph, a chart, and a plot can all refer to the same thing. Is there any even somewhat consistent distinction in these three words? (I mean, in this particular sense of the words; it is not ...
2
votes
3answers
10k views

Difference between “invest in” and “invest into” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Difference between “in” and “into” When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? Since solar ...
2
votes
3answers
9k views

What is the difference, if any, between 'art', 'the arts', and 'Art'?

In answer to this question, there was some discussion about whether these two sentences are equivalent: Art nurtures the soul. The arts nurture the soul. Are they equivalent? 'The arts' is ...
2
votes
3answers
27k views

“To which extent?” vs. “To what extent?”

Is there a difference in meaning between "to which extent" and "to what extent"? Are they used in different geographical areas?
2
votes
1answer
235 views

What is the difference between “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry” and “Prince William and Kate Middleton were married”?

In today’s New York Times (April. 30th) I saw the following line under the caption of “Royal Wedding”: “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry: Prince William and Kate Middleton were married on ...
2
votes
3answers
875 views

Difference between “stir up” and “provoke”

Just I want to know the difference between the "stir up" and "provoke", where it should be placed exactly.
2
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2answers
3k views

“Cuddle”, “snuggle” or “huggle”

There is a ton of words with similar, yet slightly different meaning that describe this kind of physical affection where we touch a loved one. What is the difference between cuddle, snuggle and ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

It is irritating me. It is irritating to me [closed]

It is irritating me. It is irritating to me. Which one is correct? Does the word "irritating" work as an adjective in my second one sentence?
2
votes
1answer
64 views

What's the difference between these two sentences?

Health facilities reported 1000 people killed and 3000 wounded since March 19. Health facilities reported that 1000 people were killed and 3000 were wounded since March 19. Isn't 'killed' ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Difference between “in contrast to” and “in contrast with”

I am just wondering about the difference between: in contrast to and in contrast with
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2answers
43 views

“Aforementioned” vs. “In question”

As I know, the words "Aforementioned" and "In question" have a similar meaning and imply referring to something that has already been mentioned, but when I looked up at the internet i found out that ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Exhortation v. Hortation - difference

Exhortation v. Hortation Are there any difference in (a) the usage and (b) the meaning of the two? It seems to me that Hortation is an obsolete word because in OED there is only a very brief ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

“Do not rely” on something, does rely focus on never using “something”?

So, I was talking with a friend of mine a little while back about what "relying" on something means. His take was that to "rely" on something was to completely depend on the "something", as in only ...
2
votes
1answer
242 views

Is the following sentence odd? “I find them comic”

But this is the Old Bailey. He's a Lord — or she's a Lady. You may find the wigs and the ceremonial ways that people refer to each other strange or intimidating. I was advised. But I don't find ...