This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2
votes
1answer
83 views

“Heat up” or “heat”

It seems they have same meaning but why are we using the phrasal verb? Or they have same meaning?
2
votes
4answers
13k views

“Interested in knowing” versus “interested to know”

I am interested to know if, for some, there is a subtle difference between the two phrases in the title. I am equally interested in knowing if there is a subtle difference.
2
votes
2answers
285 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
2
votes
0answers
81 views

What’s the difference between “cite” and “cite to”? [closed]

From page 69 of Frederick Shauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New York state court may cite to a case decided in Vermont . . . The courts are not even required to cite to these “authorities,” let ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“It would the best thing I have ever seen” vs “…I had ever seen” [closed]

Just heard a song "Majestic" and as I am continuously trying to improve my English, I noticed something a bit unclear to me. A sight for sore eyes To the blind would be awful majestic It would ...
2
votes
3answers
227 views

how to handle EN US/UK differences [closed]

If you are from Great Britain, or other English speaking country (except US), or even most of European countries where you learn british-english and are working for an American company would you ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

What is the difference of “Standing rules” of an organization and “Rules” of an organization? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the differences among ‘Rules’, ‘Standing Rules’, and ‘Bylaw’? I recently received the articles of an organization (community club) which is captioned as ...
2
votes
4answers
10k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
2
votes
5answers
1k views

“Except for” vs “Except In”

What is the difference between the following two? We didn't have a chance to meet, except for the campaign. We didn't have a chance to meet, except in the campaign [or "except for in the ...
2
votes
2answers
727 views

“accuracy” or “accurateness”? [closed]

Do "accuracy" and "accurateness" have the exact same meaning? When is one of them preferred over the other one? "accurateness" does not exist as an entry in Oxford Dictionary of English and Longman ...
2
votes
2answers
362 views

What is the difference between “take notes” and “make notes”? [closed]

Most dictionaries simply say that to take/make notes means to write notes. Is there anything more to this simple definition?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “pliable” and “pliant”?

I am confused between pliable and pliant. What's the difference? The explanation in the Oxford Dictionary seems vague: pliable 1. easily bent; flexible [quality leather is ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Differences between “Can you play the guitar?” and “Can you play guitar?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Omission of definite article with musical instruments Is there any difference between the following sentences? Can you play the guitar? Can you play guitar?
1
vote
4answers
6k views

Which is correct: “I am drinking ice cream” or “I am eating ice cream”?

Assuming there is no material in ice cream to be chewed, which is the correct sentence? I am drinking ice cream. I am eating ice cream.
1
vote
7answers
1k views

What is the difference between “I earn $500 each month” and “I earn $500 per month”?

What is the difference between these two sentences? I earn $500 each month I earn $500 per month
1
vote
3answers
105k views

What is the difference between 'curricula' and 'curriculum'?

What is the difference between 'curricula' and 'curriculum'? Both appear to have the same definition. Are they used in the same context?
1
vote
8answers
407 views

What is more appropriate, “data” or “information” when referring to facts about something. What's the difference really?

The Computer Studies teacher quipped, "There is a lot of data out there regarding HTML programming". What does this really mean? Will it make any difference if the teacher had used "information" in ...
1
vote
2answers
880 views

How to use “know” and “realize” correctly

Are they just actually the same? Especially as in the following examples: I realize then whom I love. I know then whom I love.
1
vote
10answers
10k views

What is the difference between “legacy” and “inheritance”?

Can someone explain the difference between legacy and inheritance?
1
vote
3answers
453 views

The rules of the game vs. the laws of the game

Do rule and law have the same meaning when you talk about an activity like a game? I came across this sentence in the Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's Dictionay: "Match officials should not ...
1
vote
2answers
593 views

“Release”, “free”, or “delete allocated memory”?

release the allocated memory. free the allocated memory. delete the allocated memory. What are the differences between them?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“don't” vs “didn't”

Someone sent M a package. So, M didn't receive the package. When I asked M, "Have you received the package?" What should her reply be? "I don't receive the package", or "I didn't receive the ...
1
vote
2answers
480 views

Dignitary vs VIP(Very Important Person)

Incidentally I have heard the CBS news about the Bulgarian president visit in US. The exact sentence was something like: We can't be too specific about the president's schedule due to security ...
1
vote
8answers
1k views

Is there a difference between “bitter” and “better” in pronunciation?

I was wondering if there was any difference between "bitter" and "better" in pronunciation? My assumption is that one is pronounced with a soft "d" as in "better" and the other one with a hard "t" as ...
1
vote
2answers
333 views

Differences between “stupid to the last drop” and “stupid”

My colleague was screaming You are stupid to the last drop at another colleague who accidentally formatted her hard disk. Is there such an expression as stupid to the last drop? Are there ...
1
vote
4answers
767 views

What's the difference between 'fallacy' and 'misnomer'? [closed]

In which contexts the usage vary?
1
vote
2answers
469 views

What's the difference between “universality” and “pervasiveness”?

The meanings of these two words seem the same, but their spellings are very different.
1
vote
4answers
816 views

What is the difference between “splitting something” and “dividing something”?

What is the difference between "splitting something" and "dividing something"? When do people say split and when do they say divide?
1
vote
2answers
35k views

What is the difference between “phonetic” and “phonemic”? [closed]

I've read several descriptions but I still don't understand. From what I can gather, the main (or only) difference is phonemics is not concerned with "nondistinctive elements" but I don't know what ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

“Concatenate” vs. “merge” vs. “join” in scientific text

I wonder what the difference is between concatenate, merge and join from the lexical point of view. These words are often used in scientific or programming text. It seems to me that different authors ...
1
vote
5answers
657 views

Distinctive vs Distinguishing

Is there a difference between the two words when used for saying “that which distinguishes (something) from others”? For example … the distinctive patterns on the skin … or … the distinguishing ...
1
vote
3answers
517 views

Are the words “soul” and “spirit” synonymous? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Difference between “spirit” and “soul” Is there any difference between the two? Or do both refer to the part of body that is believed to exist ...
1
vote
2answers
135 views

What is the difference between an anthology and a florilegium?

Both words have origins meaning a gathering of flowers — one from Greek and one from Latin. Both appear to have the same definition. When should I use one rather than the other?
1
vote
7answers
3k views

Do the words “peasant” and “pissant” mean the same thing?

I recently completed reading the novel "Cat's cradle" by Kurt Vonnegut. In this novel he describes peasant as: "A pissant is somebody who thinks he's so damn smart, he can never keep his mouth ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “destruction” and “deconstruction”? [closed]

I am Hungarian, and I can completely understand the words destruction, construction, and deconstruction, although the corresponding Hungarian words are rarely used. I don't know if the con- possesses ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Difference between “wedding” and “marriage”

What is the correct usage between the following? A wedding anniversary A marriage anniversary? What differences are there, if any.
1
vote
2answers
11k views

“Do you have” vs “Have you got”

I am studying English and I want to know the main difference between “Have you got?” and “Do you have?” questions. Are they the same? Is one more formal than the other?
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Difference between “prodigal” and “profligate”

I have researched this topic a bit. One site suggested that prodigal is having reformed after being wasteful, while profligate is still engaging in such behavior. However on studying the origin of ...
1
vote
2answers
338 views

The use of “for” and “of”

Are for and of interchangeable in these circumstances? Is the meaning affected at all? He was the Minister for Education. He was the Minister of Education. The Institute of Medical ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

“We've” vs “We have” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Is it appropriate to use short form of “have” ('ve) when it means possession? Can you contract the main verb in a sentence? Is we've equivalent to we ...
1
vote
4answers
160 views

what is the difference between a spy and an informer?

Is a "spy" different from an "informer"? If the answer is yes, what differences are there?
1
vote
5answers
1k views

describe health without using the word health

I'm looking for a word (or short phrase) that describes a continuum of health, without using the word "health" (or the word "wellness"). We are developing a construct that places people on a ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

What's the difference between “lad” and “mate” in British English? [closed]

Can "lad" only be used to address a male, while "mate" both male and female?
1
vote
3answers
265 views

“Child”/“kid” implies paternity/maternity relationship?

Do the words "child" and "kid" imply a paternity (or maternity) relationship, just like "son" or "daughter"? If true, how can I refer to a child without implying paternity? Example: if Anne is a ...
1
vote
3answers
232 views

“compiled with gcc” vs “compiled in gcc”

"This program was compiled with gcc." "This program was compiled in gcc." "This program was written in C++." "This program was written with C++." Note: gcc is a widely used compiler ...
1
vote
3answers
114 views

”voice controlled” versus ”voice activated” [closed]

While researching a computer game, I came across the terms “voice controlled” and “voice activated”. What is the difference between them?
1
vote
2answers
986 views

Is there a difference between “brainstorming” and “mindstorming”? [closed]

Some people use brainstorming, others use mindstorming. I could not find the difference between the two words.
1
vote
4answers
4k views

What’s the difference between “tool” and “utility”?

I find these two words appear together often, especially mentioned as tool and utility for the Unix operating system. So I am wondering about the difference between them.
1
vote
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between “neurologic” and “neurological”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it “geometric” but “theoretical”? A Google search was not immediately helpful, but I found this document: ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Difference between “focus” and “concentration”

What is the difference between focus and concentration in the following context? High-flow activities require focus and concentration; your mind is actively engaged in what you are doing.