This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2
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3answers
14k views

Difference between “explain” and “describe” [closed]

What is the difference between "explain" and "describe"? When to use one over the other?
2
votes
2answers
292 views

How to rephrase the term “physical sciences”? [closed]

A distinction is often made in the natural sciences between the life sciences and the physical sciences. Semantically, I believe this is a false distinction. Since all life depends on a physical ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Difference between “to posit” and “to postulate”

What exactly is the difference in meaning between the two words posit and postulate, besides the fact that the latter one is also used as a noun? Both words are formal and their definition are ...
2
votes
1answer
422 views

Difference between a 'medicine' and a 'medicinal'

What is the exact difference between the words "medicine" and "medicinal"? For medicinal, Free Dictionary states: "A preparation or product having the properties of a medicine." But the fact ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

The difference between “look at” and “see”

What is the difference between look at and see? For example: Can I look at it? Can I see it? Let's go to look at him. Let's go to see him.
2
votes
1answer
974 views

Proper use of “context” in a phrase

Which of the following phrases is correct? Everything is in some context. or Everything has some context.
2
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1answer
176 views

“At the Passing” Or “On the Passing”

Steve Ballmer writes: “I want to express my deepest condolences at the passing of Steve Jobs, one of the founders of our industry and a true visionary. My heart goes out to his family, everyone at ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does “fare” apply to non-persons?

If one pays for transportation of oneself a fare has been paid. What is paid if the transportation is of a non-person object (a parcel, a letter, a vegetable, a box of rocks)?
2
votes
3answers
7k views

What's the difference between a graph, a chart, and a plot?

A graph, a chart, and a plot can all refer to the same thing. Is there any even somewhat consistent distinction in these three words? (I mean, in this particular sense of the words; it is not ...
2
votes
3answers
9k views

Difference between “invest in” and “invest into” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Difference between “in” and “into” When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? Since solar ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What is the difference, if any, between 'art', 'the arts', and 'Art'?

In answer to this question, there was some discussion about whether these two sentences are equivalent: Art nurtures the soul. The arts nurture the soul. Are they equivalent? 'The arts' is ...
2
votes
3answers
24k views

“To which extent?” vs. “To what extent?”

Is there a difference in meaning between "to which extent" and "to what extent"? Are they used in different geographical areas?
2
votes
1answer
233 views

What is the difference between “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry” and “Prince William and Kate Middleton were married”?

In today’s New York Times (April. 30th) I saw the following line under the caption of “Royal Wedding”: “Prince William and Kate Middleton Marry: Prince William and Kate Middleton were married on ...
2
votes
3answers
819 views

Difference between “stir up” and “provoke”

Just I want to know the difference between the "stir up" and "provoke", where it should be placed exactly.
2
votes
4answers
16k views

“Interested in knowing” versus “interested to know”

I am interested to know if, for some, there is a subtle difference between the two phrases in the title. I am equally interested in knowing if there is a subtle difference.
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Cuddle”, “snuggle” or “huggle”

There is a ton of words with similar, yet slightly different meaning that describe this kind of physical affection where we touch a loved one. What is the difference between cuddle, snuggle and ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

“Do not rely” on something, does rely focus on never using “something”?

So, I was talking with a friend of mine a little while back about what "relying" on something means. His take was that to "rely" on something was to completely depend on the "something", as in only ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Is the following sentence odd? “I find them comic”

But this is the Old Bailey. He's a Lord — or she's a Lady. You may find the wigs and the ceremonial ways that people refer to each other strange or intimidating. I was advised. But I don't find ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

When to use “in” and “at”

when do I use "in" and "at" in a sentence? for example is "I will coming to learn English in India or At India"
2
votes
1answer
422 views

Can one use “may” and “might” in the same sentence?

Is it possible to use may and might in the same sentence to describe a potential outcome? For example: While Sara may recognise the car, Paul might not.
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
2
votes
3answers
173 views

Similarities and differences: 'in + VERBing' vs 'VERBing' alone

Source: p 145, Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer In being an empirical response to an empirical claim, this explanation engages Realism on its own terms, and so little can be said ...
2
votes
1answer
128 views

“brain-cramp” vs “blank-out” [closed]

When mind lapses instantly I call it blank-out. Recently I have come across brain-cramp and it is providing almost same meaning as blank-out. Are both same ? Cramp word is not playing big heavy dice ...
2
votes
1answer
190 views

“I am from” vs. “I am with”

I want to say that I work for Company A or represent it. I see 2 ways to express this: I am from Company A I am with Company A Which way is correct one? What are other ways to say it? ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “general” and “generic”?

What is the difference between them? Do they have different meanings? When should I use "general" or "generic"?
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Difference between “Pitiful” and “Pitiable”?

Would you be kind enough to explain the nuance between "pitiful" and "pitiable"? My Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary shows two similar meanings for the aforementioned words. deserving pity or ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

Use of the word “sovereign”?

I know this is a bit odd to ask, but I'm really stumped on this SAT question (Test 4, Section 8, Q: 17). The author is deriding the critics of television. Unlike everyone else, the theorist has ...
2
votes
1answer
725 views

Difference between a “movement” and a “campaign”

A campaign means: an organized course of action to achieve a goal A movement means: a group of people working together to advance their shared political, social, or artistic ideas Are ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

“As I said” vs. “Like I said”

I was told that saying Like I said isn't grammatically correct although it is used a lot. That we should use As I said instead. Is it true?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

exclamatory sentence: HOW vs. WHAT?

I say: A) What a good heart you have! B) How beautiful a girl she is! C) What awful weather! D) How I wish to have a long vacation these days! E) How little money we have! Do ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

“Moderator for” vs. “moderator of”

In OAAD, there's an example for the entry moderator: moderators of online discussion groups But I've seen the preposition for used in that context by native speakers too. Are they both correct? ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

the difference between company and a companion [closed]

In what situation would you use company or a companion in the following sentences? I have a dog and it's my company. I have a dog and it's my companion. Can I use company instead of companion ...
2
votes
5answers
4k views

What's the difference between “lonely” and “lonesome”

Both words seem to be used interchangeably. E.g., I'm feeling lonely tonight. I'm feeling lonesome tonight. I guess I always felt "lonesome" was somehow more severe and heart-wrenching, ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“They all are fine” vs. “they are all fine” [closed]

The situation is that someone asks me how my family are; I then want to answer that they all are fine. I want to know whether the sentences "They all are fine." and "They are all fine." have the ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”

What's the difference between saying; Will you be going home this summer? Will you go home this summer? Are there any differences between these in written or spoken English?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“Material world”, “Physical world”, “Corporeal world” - what's the difference?

What's the difference or different hues of meaning between these three phrases?
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Academic experience VS Research experience

What is the difference between academic experience and research experience? In my opinion, academic experience is a super set of research experience. Is that right? But, what other aspects should ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

“Heat up” or “heat”

It seems they have same meaning but why are we using the phrasal verb? Or they have same meaning?
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Difference between unsuited and unsuitable

Can you use both words as synonyms? Or only in some cases? Or do they have completely different meanings?
2
votes
2answers
503 views

“Inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, “trans-” in relation to disciplines

In academia the words inter-discipline, multi-discipline, trans-discipline, or cross-discipline are used to describe a type of combination between different disciplines or the uniqueness of a field. ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

What’s the difference between “cite” and “cite to”? [closed]

From page 69 of Frederick Shauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New York state court may cite to a case decided in Vermont . . . The courts are not even required to cite to these “authorities,” let ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“It would the best thing I have ever seen” vs “…I had ever seen” [closed]

Just heard a song "Majestic" and as I am continuously trying to improve my English, I noticed something a bit unclear to me. A sight for sore eyes To the blind would be awful majestic It would ...
2
votes
3answers
236 views

how to handle EN US/UK differences [closed]

If you are from Great Britain, or other English speaking country (except US), or even most of European countries where you learn british-english and are working for an American company would you ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

What is the difference of “Standing rules” of an organization and “Rules” of an organization? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the differences among ‘Rules’, ‘Standing Rules’, and ‘Bylaw’? I recently received the articles of an organization (community club) which is captioned as ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

“Except for” vs “Except In”

What is the difference between the following two? We didn't have a chance to meet, except for the campaign. We didn't have a chance to meet, except in the campaign [or "except for in the ...
2
votes
2answers
784 views

What is the difference between “take notes” and “make notes”? [closed]

Most dictionaries simply say that to take/make notes means to write notes. Is there anything more to this simple definition?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “pliable” and “pliant”?

I am confused between pliable and pliant. What's the difference? The explanation in the Oxford Dictionary seems vague: pliable 1. easily bent; flexible [quality leather is ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Differences between “Can you play the guitar?” and “Can you play guitar?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Omission of definite article with musical instruments Is there any difference between the following sentences? Can you play the guitar? Can you play guitar?
1
vote
4answers
7k views

Which is correct: “I am drinking ice cream” or “I am eating ice cream”?

Assuming there is no material in ice cream to be chewed, which is the correct sentence? I am drinking ice cream. I am eating ice cream.