This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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-4
votes
1answer
69 views

What is difference between “get off” and “get out of”? [closed]

What is the difference when you say “get off” and “get out of”?
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Difference between twilight zone and gray area

I have found in dictionary that gray area = an ill-defined situation or area of activity not readily conforming to a category or set of rules. Twilight zone = The ambiguous region between two ...
5
votes
2answers
86 views

What is a word for something that you desperately want and/or craved for, but NEVER GOT?

Take this situation; Everyone was given ice cream at the birthday party, except for Todd. After Todd got home, he felt very disheartened that he never got the chance to taste the ice-cream there. He ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

What's the difference between “to hear” and “to listen”? [closed]

Is it the same thing to say "I'm hearing you." to "I'm listening to you."?, And what makes them the same or different. Is to hear a song the same as to listen? I have the idea that to hear is ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

difference between post deictic and epithet

I was looking at some examples of the two, and there was one example including two sentences of different kinds that I couldn't sense the exact difference between. Deictics: The identical three (...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

'By' vs 'in' before agent in passive voice sentence [closed]

I would like to know if there is any difference in meaning when you use "by" or "in" before the agent in the passive voice sentence. The active voice: This shop sells all the vegetables. ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Why is “and” not used before “, etc.”? [closed]

When you use , etc. to indicate that further, similar items are included, for example: We’re trying to resolve problems of withdrawal, peer pressure, etc. Is it incorrect to use , and etc.?
2
votes
2answers
92 views

Distinguish twins vs distinguish between twins

I'm confused about the use of the word "Distinguish". The link shows an example sentence where the verb is used as an intransitive verb: Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? But I ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

User's Guide vs. User's Manual vs. Manual [duplicate]

I am discussing with my colleagues whether a 300+ page book that describes how to use a product we manufacture should be called a User's Manual, Manual or User's Guide, and how it should be referred ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

Difference between examine and evaluate [closed]

What's the difference between examine and evaluate?
12
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between a cafe and a diner?

I recently ate at an establishment called The Park Cafe and Diner. How could a debate not ensue? What is the difference between a Cafe and Diner? Apparently, this place is both. I have read various ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

What's the difference between “kind of” and “a little bit”?

I am a little bit angry. I am kind of angry. I searched the two phrases, but can't found the difference. Are them the same?
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Which of this sentences is more accurate in terms of U.S. English? [duplicate]

Which of this sentences is more accurate in terms of U.S. English: "Travelling by train is very popular among the Chinese" or "Travels on trains are very popular among the Chinese" ?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

We vs. we have (we've)

I was wondering when to use 'have' in a sentence like 'There has to be something we (have) missed'. I've looked only, but couldn't find a clear-cut answer. A clear explanation would be greatly ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Difference between indignation and umbrage

Indignation  anger, because of something that is wrong or not fair Umbrage a feeling of being upset or annoyed, usually because you feel that someone has been rude or shown no respect ...
5
votes
1answer
86 views

Normalcy or Normality?

Both normalcy and normality have the definition of "the state of being normal." From Wiktionary: Normalcy - "The state of being normal; the fact of being normal; normality." Normality - "The state ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

What is the difference between “special” and “specific” in usage?

Which one is correct to use in the following sentence; special or specific? Both adjectives seem to be interchangeable. According to Dictionary.com, specific means 1. having a special application, ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

What's the difference between fully, wholly, completely and totally? [closed]

I would like to know if there are any differences in usage, grammar and meaning of: fully, wholly, completely and totally. According to the Macmillan Dictionary; fully means completely, completely ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Why the expression “being lied about” is separated with commas

Why the expression "being lied" in contrast to "being hated" is separated with commas? What is the difference? Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated don't give way to ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

What is the generic term for the distinction between left and right eye?

I'm writing an ophthalmology-related tutorial, and I need to reference the distinction between left and right eyes — for instance, if I'm referring to this case information: "Male; 29 years old; Left ...
2
votes
2answers
160 views

What's the difference between “established” and “founded” [closed]

In this sentence: "CARE was ...... in 1945 to help people after World War II." A. founded B. built C. established D. constructed The answer is C. But why don't we use "founded" in this case, I ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Does “expire” have to be followed by “on”?

I found this on someone's resume: expires 12/10/2017 Is this correct or should it be expires on 12/10/2017 If it makes any difference, this resume is from someone in Australia.
3
votes
2answers
75 views

Should this be “ensure,” and not "insure?

The assure vs. insure vs. ensure has been discussed frequently on this site. But I came across a New Yorker article, which has excellent editing, which uses "insure" when it seemingly should have used ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Why “Middle East” not “Central East”, and Why “Central Java” not “Middle Java”

I'm wondering why Middle East is not called Central East. And why Central Asia is sometimes referred to as Middle Asia (as I read on Wikipedia). I've looked up the difference between middle and ...
-1
votes
2answers
85 views

Usage of “back” as a verb. Can we use “We will back soon”?

Can we use "We will back soon"? Or is the correct form "We will be back soon"? What about "We'll be back soon"?
1
vote
1answer
76 views

What is the difference between 'clever' and 'cunning'? [closed]

It is common that these two words mean similar to each other, what is the difference?
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Difference between elegancy and elegance

I recently saw someone use the word "elegancy" for the first time in forever, and it set me wondering about (and wandering about) why the synonym "elegance" appears to be the preferred noun. I ...
1
vote
3answers
132 views

Can you use “get” in a past tense sentence

I had a voice over where I was asked to record the following line in a script: "Our small initiative turned into a sizeable movement with the support of influencers, who helped spread the word and ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Assume vs make assumptions [closed]

Is there any difference in the level of formality, frequency of usage, etc? Example sentences: Never assume anything. Never make any assumptions.
-2
votes
1answer
32 views

concentrate and accumulate [closed]

At http://loe.org/shows/shows.html?programID=03-P13-00018 I saw For example, samples of seawater will be filtered and concentrated. I wonder the difference between "concentrate" and "...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

What is the meaning of this sentence “We got on the bus downtown”

Which one is correct? We were going downtown by the bus. We got on the bus when we were there (downtown).
0
votes
3answers
65 views

Good decision I “made” / “have made” today

As a non-native English speaker, I'm a little bit confused. Should I say: The only good decision I made today was to ... or The only good decision I have made today was to ... What is the ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

What is the difference between “regardless” and “irrelevant”? [closed]

They are both adjective that mean not relating to something. Are the terms interchangeable?
1
vote
1answer
93 views

“impairment” vs. “impediment” (and derivatives)

Today I wrote the phrase "free from any procedural impediments" and am wondering how the meaning would change if I instead wrote "free from any procedural impairments." What is the difference between:...
7
votes
2answers
927 views

Foul language vs. vulgar language [closed]

I have been able to find the differences between many pairs of words/phrases of similar meaning on Stack Exchange except for one — vulgar language and foul language. Could anyone shed some light on ...
1
vote
2answers
120 views

How about Sunday vs How about on Sunday?

"How about" are followed by nouns, clauses or Verb+ing. But is it grammatically correct to say "How about on Sunday?" I got more results Googling "How about on Sunday?" than "How about Sunday?" Which ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Is “plurality” a valid word, and if so, what's the difference between it and “pluralisation”?

When I saw the word "plurality" being used in a grammar context, I thought they were getting mixed up with election related terminology - winning more votes than anyone else, but not getting a ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

What's the difference between strive and struggle

According to the Macmillan dictionary, strive is to make a lot of effort to achieve sth; and struggle to try hard to do sth that is very difficult. I would like to know the grammatic and semantic ...
2
votes
3answers
454 views

“got engaged” vs. “became engaged”

On the one hand, During the course of the summer, Esther got engaged. sounds weak and informal. On the other hand, During the course of the summer, Esther became engaged. sounds weird, ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

has to do with vs has something to do with

What's the difference between the meanings of these two sentences? My homework has to do with last week's activity. My homework has something to do with last week's activity.
1
vote
1answer
20 views

any other vs other [closed]

What's the difference between the two sentences? I need any other books that I can replace with this. I need other books that I can replace with this.
2
votes
2answers
59 views

Word for different office/work “cultures”

I am looking for a word to describe differences between two groups of professional fields. Our small company is having a competition for best outside-of-work pictures. There are about 10 people in ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Be successful vs good luck [closed]

Does it sound right to say "be successful" instead of "good luck" as a quick reply? For instance: A : I have a tough exam tomorrow. B : I hope you'll be successful in your exam. I suppose ...
5
votes
2answers
742 views

What is the difference between words “psyched” and “thrilled”?

For people like me, non-native English speakers, it's really hard to figure out the differences in their meaning between words "psyched" and "thrilled". Are they interchangeable? Is the meaning ...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

What are the differences between the following sentences? [closed]

What are the differences between the following sentences? The products are delivered. The products have been delivered
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Propriety vs. appropriateness [closed]

What it the difference (if any exists) between propriety and appropriateness? For example, is there any difference between "norms of propriety" and "norms of appropriateness"?
0
votes
3answers
61 views

What's the difference in meaning between at and in? [closed]

I would like to know what's the difference in meaning in the sentences below: At no time were we friends. We were friends in no time.
3
votes
2answers
62 views

Using the present tense in recounting past events

There's a particular colloquial usage of the present tense in recounting past events that has a shade of meaning that I've been unable to put my finger on. As an example, instead of: And then Bob ...
-2
votes
1answer
56 views

Can LGTM and SGTM be used interchangeablay?

LGTM = Looks Good to Me SGTM = Sounds Good to Me I see these two abbreviations used frequently to express "I agree with your idea, go ahead". Can they be used interchangeably? Is there any subtle ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

“Read the sentence aloud” vs “Speak the sentence aloud”

A. Read the sentence aloud. B. Speak the sentence aloud. Which is more natural among native English speakers? Is there any subtle difference between the two? Thanks in advance.