Tagged Questions

This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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2
votes
2answers
886 views

Difference between “presidentship” and “presidency”

What's the difference between presidentship and presidency? Please give examples to show the difference.
-1
votes
2answers
9k views

“I got it covered” vs “I've got it covered” [closed]

Which of the two sentences is correct and why: I got it covered. or I've got it covered. Edit: I am referring to usage that implies that you have something under control: Sally: Did ...
0
votes
2answers
791 views

Usage differences between “glum”, “grumpy”, “sulky”, “glower”, and “morose”

I learned from my English book these are synonyms. However I am curious to know what the specific usage of each word is. How much interchangeable are they with each other? Consider the sentence ...
1
vote
3answers
506 views

Usage difference between modest vs decent?

The Dictionary definitions are below: Modest = not excessively large, elaborate, or expensive. Decent = appropriate; fitting Please consider below sentences He has a modest three ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Usage differences between “than”, “to”, and “over”

I understand that than, rather than, over and to are used to compare things. How ever I am not sure when to use those for specific scenarios. Are these interchangeable? Consider the sentence below: ...
0
votes
3answers
796 views

Can I always use “unless” interchangeably with “if not”? [closed]

I have been bothered by the question whether 'unless' and 'if not' can be used interchangeably. I think they can have the opposite meaning, but I am not sure. Could you support my opinion with some ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

'I hope it rains' or 'I hope it will rain'

I've been through several books for teaching English as a foreign language, and these structures are usually presented as exact synonyms. But isn't there a difference? Just by looking at the verb ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
1
vote
1answer
203 views

Symphonic vs. symphony

Is there any clear line between a symphony and symphonic? For long, I thought that a symphony was simply a "song" played by a symphonic orchestra. Then I realized that more often than not, the ...
0
votes
2answers
595 views

“Feeding” data or “entering” data: which one is correct?

Which is the better verb to use with data: feeding or entering? Furthermore, which is more common in the literature of the field and which do people who work in the field say more often? Are they ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Do “figure out” and “realize” mean the same? [closed]

Talking about noticing something, do both mean the same? For example: I just figured out that the ball is blue. I just realized that the ball is blue.
1
vote
2answers
933 views

Is there a difference between “brainstorming” and “mindstorming”? [closed]

Some people use brainstorming, others use mindstorming. I could not find the difference between the two words.
1
vote
2answers
255 views

“types of data” vs. “data types” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Data source types” vs. “types of data sources” Please can you tell me that what the difference is between "types of data" and "data types". Are they the same? For ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “bloke”, “chap” and “lad”?

Several synonyms are used in the UK: bloke, chap, lad. What's the difference between them?
1
vote
1answer
158 views

Connotation of terms regarding one's profession [closed]

I'm wondering if there are more-commonly-than-not held connotations for terms regarding occupation that would differentiate between one's own personal experience in a field versus the description of ...
1
vote
2answers
475 views

Can “supposed to” be used to mean “considered to”?

I have a question regarding expressions like these: The new Al Pacino movie is supposed to be a good movie. Asians are not supposed to be good ball players. Whale is supposed to be the smartest ...
1
vote
1answer
256 views

“Clod” vs. “chunk” vs. “lump”

Are there usage differences between clod, chunk, and lump? Are they interchangeable? For example, is it better to use lump or clod for wood?
3
votes
0answers
386 views

“Straight ahead” vs. “straight as you go” [closed]

Is straight as you go used often? What is the main difference to straight ahead? I have heard straight ahead in conversations quite a bit, but straight as you go doesn’t ring a bell. Perhaps it ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

“Point to” and “point at”

I'm having trouble putting the difference in meaning between "point to" and "point at" into words and my Longman dictionary isn't helping, I'm afraid. I'm not a native speaker, but I feel there is a ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

Is there any difference in meaning between “All these” and “All of these”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “all this” instead of “all of this”? Are they fully interchangeable, or do they have a somewhat different usage? Common sense suggests that "all ...
3
votes
3answers
11k views

“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
6
votes
1answer
249 views

Difference between “mark” and “marker”

In a diagram, I added small visual elements to identify specific objects. Should I call these things (visual) marks or (visual) markers? What is the difference? Is there a better term? According to ...
2
votes
4answers
397 views

“To latch in a recess/groove” vs. “to catch in a recess/groove”

Is there a difference in meaning when used in a technical context? For example, does a fork latch in a recess when pressed or does it catch in the recess?
3
votes
3answers
941 views

Difference between “before” and “in front of”

Which one is correct? The patterns swam before her eyes. OR The patterns swam in front of her eyes. I know that "before" is mostly used when we talk about the time, but is it right to ...
0
votes
1answer
194 views

word usage 'understand each other' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Each other” vs. “one another” Those using Irish Sign Language, American Sign Language or British Sign Language, will not automatically understand one another. or ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Era”, “age”, and “epoch”

What are the differences and relations between era, age, and epoch? For example, should I say one of these? We are now in the digital era. We are now in the digital age. We are now in the digital ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Usage of “matter” and “substance”

What is the difference between matter and substance? For example, are ice and water "the same matter" or "the same substance"? Dictionaries seem vague about the difference. For example, the Oxford ...
16
votes
3answers
58k views

“Thru” vs. “through”

Could anyone explain the differences between "thru" and "through"? Is the difference only in spelling? Is "thru" some sort of slang?
4
votes
1answer
6k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
2
votes
1answer
176 views

Information that the reports can work 'off' or 'of' [closed]

Should it be Last years data set contains information that the reports can work off or Last years data set contains information that the reports can work of ?
4
votes
3answers
4k views

“Archetype” vs. “stereotype”

In terms of usage, is it fair to say that an archetype is a broader description of a class than a stereotype? Here’s a reference to the usage of archetype becoming blurry in my mind. Mindy Kaling, ...
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between seed, nut, kernel, pit, grain

I was reading on a food package that it contained seeds AND grains. I thought, aren't they the same thing? I thougth for a second and it seems like the following are all the same thing: Seed (as in ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Meaning of various valedictions or closing expressions

Related to, but I believe distinct from, the following questions: What does the "yours" in "yours sincerely" mean? What are some expressions that can be used to end an email? ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

Accomplishment vs. Achievement (implicit superiority)

I elsewhere saw the difference between the two explained thusly: accomplished denoted "completed for someone else's benefit", achieved "completed by oneself". I consider it a one off, but can anyone ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“Let's plan to meet at three o'clock” vs. “Let's meet at three o'clock”

What's the differences between the two? Personally, I'd say let's meet each other at three o'clock. Is formality the only difference between them? Here is the complete conversation:
5
votes
6answers
5k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
0
votes
1answer
702 views

Difference between “fallback” and “fall back”? [closed]

I am struggling to understand when to use fallback and when fall back (with a space). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallback http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_back_and_forward Basically I have to ...
-1
votes
1answer
781 views

“Button up” vs. “button down” [closed]

As it pertains to a dress shirt, which is the correct usage or do these terms have different meanings?
2
votes
2answers
328 views

The differences among: deliver, ship, and transmit

Are these definitions correct? Delivered: The package has arrived at your place. Shipped: The package was just sent. Which word can be used to describe that the package is on its way? ...
18
votes
4answers
10k views

“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

The usage of slander, defame, vilify, and calumniate

English is not my native language. I am confused about the usage of these four words: slander, defame, vilify, and calumniate. They are all verbs with almost the same meaning and I don't which one ...
2
votes
1answer
424 views

“Advertising” vs. “Advertisement” in US political commercials

This is the first year I noticed the verbal boilerplate at the end of US political commercials states: Group X is responsible for the content of this advertising. compared to what I recall (and ...
2
votes
1answer
617 views

What's the difference between “vita”, “curriculum vitae”, “maintenance history” and “résumé”?

As far as I know, the words vita curriculum vitae résumé maintenance history all mean a document that includes information about your life and your education that you give a company if you want to ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

How different is “Nothingness” from “Nothing,” “Emptiness,” “Void,” “Vanity,” “Vacuum,” and “Zero”?”

Pursuant to my previous question on “Fear Factors” in the article of Financial Times (November 23, 2007) -“The ten things everyone should know about science,” there was the following sentence: ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“rather than” vs “as opposed to” [closed]

We do not know whether X will have an effect on element Y as opposed to others. We do not know whether X will have an effect on element Y rather than on others. The first version is the first ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“I wouldn't ever” vs. “I would never”

The two expressions from the title, “I wouldn't ever” and “I would never”, are very similar. But are they completely equivalent or do they bear any subtle differences? If so, how do they differ in ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

“Not possible” and “Impossible”

When we say, It is not fair. or It is unfair. I'm not sure enough to say whether both of the sentences have the same meaning or not though superficially, there is no difference between ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Difference between “governorate”, “province” and “state” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are: province, territory, protectorate, state…? Canada has provinces, the US has states and Egypt has governorates. What's the difference?