-1
votes
1answer
79 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Can “cloven” be used instead of “cleaved”?

Can cloven be used in its verb form like the way broken or eaten is used? gets cloven to give rise to is cloven by Cleaved is a perfectly fine word in this context, but can cloven be used ...
0
votes
4answers
119 views

Restrain vs curb [closed]

In an exam I found this phrase: There was very strong support for the police who were determined to (curb) this kind of crime. There was a choice between restrain and curb. Why was curb the ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the difference between “efficacy” and “effectiveness”?

I usually use the word "effectiveness" in conversation, but sometimes I use the word "efficacy" then self-correct with "effectiveness" . Is there a practical difference between them?
3
votes
1answer
231 views

supplant : replace :: snatch : take

The title is an analogy appeared in the GRE verbal test, and I yet can't find the analogy in it. "Snatch" means to "take" hastily or eagerly, but I don't see if "supplant" is a more hasty motion than ...
-1
votes
3answers
3k views

“Rank” and “ranking” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between rank and ranking, as in "an officer with high rankings" and "a high-rank officer"? I know perhaps there might be a difference in usage, but my question is ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “size” and “magnitude”

Following the comments to this answer to another question, what is the difference between size and magnitude? I know there's a difference, but can someone put it in a nutshell for me?
27
votes
6answers
11k views

Difference between “artifact” and “artefact”

Is there any usage preference between artifact and artefact? My understanding was that an artifact was properly applied to physical, historical objects, while an artefact was more correct for more ...
3
votes
1answer
167 views

If I change the part containing “conceivably”, does this sentence still have the same meaning?

I found a sentence in my programming book: Note that the delimiter does not have to be a bracket and could be conceivably any character. If I extracted the part: could be conceivably any ...
0
votes
2answers
758 views

What does “life plays tricks on him” mean?

What does this statement mean? Life plays tricks on him. Is it similar to He has a twisted fate.
5
votes
2answers
2k views

“Intent” vs. “intention”

How are intent and intention distinguished in terms of usage? My guess after checking my pocket dictionary is Intent is used to mean a bad purpose. Their intent to kill the boy is crystal ...
17
votes
7answers
12k views

Is there a difference between “innocent” and “not guilty”?

I have always thought the antonym of "guilty" is "innocent", but apparently it's just "not guilty". Even juries seem to agree. But why? Aren't they antonyms? Or is there a subtlety I'm missing here? ...
9
votes
7answers
2k views

Simple sentences that demonstrate differences among similar-looking words [closed]

While searching online for the difference between "sometime" and "some time", I stumbled upon this page. At the middle of the page you can see these two sentences that demonstrate the difference: ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

Which thesaurus best describes the differences between several similar words? [closed]

Which thesaurus (online or paper) best describes the differences between several similar words? As a non-native English speaker, it is often difficult for me to distinguish the slightly different ...
12
votes
2answers
6k views

What is the difference between “proven” and “proved”?

My question concerns when to use what of the above.