2
votes
1answer
49 views

How do you call a thing that raises something (e.g. an event)?

Let's say I want to describe event model in some software. Conceptually there are two sides: the one which raises an event and another which receives it. While I do know the difference between to ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

“Unavailable” vs. “not available”

What is the difference between unavailable and not available? In my opinion, unavailable is something that will never be available, while not available is something that is not available right now ...
1
vote
4answers
102 views

Difference between “exercise” and “workout”

We can say: I will do exercise today or I will do workout today. Is there any difference between them?
2
votes
3answers
54 views

“Birthday” vs. “anniversary”

Are there general guidelines for using "anniversary" vs. "birthday"? E.g., birthdays are generally for... well, birthdays. It's also used for some notable historical dates regarding countries ("Our ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

“Could not have been” vs. “must not have been”

What's the difference between "could not have been" and "must not have been"? For example, That could not have been an easy task. That must not have been an easy task. I've seen both ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Difference between elucidate and explicate

I read the definitions of these two terms rendered by various dictionaries and concluded that elucidate denotes 'to make perspicuous or intelligible (especially by explanation)'; whereas, explicate ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“To refuse oneself” vs “to refuse”

In which cases can we use "to refuse oneself" instead of "to refuse"? Can you use "oneself" to give more emphasis to the sentence, or are you only allow to use it when you refuse something done to ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Difference between “ditch”, “trench” and “gutter” [closed]

I have been trying to understand the difference between the three, is this a usage difference between American English and British English? What is the difference?
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “apt to” and “likely to”?

Just as there is a difference in meaning between "likely" and "liable" in terms of a desirable or undesirable outcome, is there any subtle diference between "apt" and "likely" ? Does the use of ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
-2
votes
2answers
59 views

Is there a difference between the words “divestment” and “divestiture”?

Is there a difference between these two terms, either in terms of definition or connotation? Context is in a business selling an asset or business line. Most of the time I hear divestment, but once in ...
1
vote
1answer
165 views

Difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”

What is the difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”? I found these questions: Difference between “aim” and “purpose” Difference between “purpose” and ...
4
votes
2answers
157 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
2
votes
4answers
130 views

“Worried person” vs. “concerned person”

According to H. Stephens, "There is a great difference between worry and concern. A worried person sees a problem, and a concerned person solves a problem". But ODE seems to be disagreeing with him: ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Committee, Association and Assembly — What's the differrence?

I'm confused by these 3 words and I'm not quite sure what the differences are. I know how council, commission and committee differ, but I can't find it for Assembly and Association. I'm using it for a ...
-1
votes
1answer
48 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
-3
votes
3answers
105 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [closed]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. although the ...
0
votes
3answers
79 views

Difference between “novice” and “newbie” [closed]

I can say "I am a novice in English" or "I am a newbie in English". Is there any difference between these?
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Difference between “Folder version” and “Folder revision” [closed]

I need to know the difference between a "file version" and a "file revision", assuming that they don't have the same meaning, I assume also that a version means that we've modified an existing folder, ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

“brain-cramp” vs “blank-out” [closed]

When mind lapses instantly I call it blank-out. Recently I have come across brain-cramp and it is providing almost same meaning as blank-out. Are both same ? Cramp word is not playing big heavy dice ...
2
votes
4answers
103 views

Being Clever vs Being Wise

A sage is wise. That young woman is clever. Both of them (I think) are good at not getting into unwanted trouble, and both are good at solving problems. So.. Is there a difference between being ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

“An exclamation” or “An ejaculation” ? Are these words synonymous? [closed]

Exclamations and ejaculations are usually expressions of surprise or anxiety, something said quickly and suddenly. Grammatically they are always interjections and may seem to be the same kind of ...
4
votes
3answers
501 views

“They were seduced” vs. “They were swayed”

I ran across the verb "sway" a little while ago and I was wondering about its usage. See: They were seduced by the low cost of the house. And They were swayed by the low cost of the house. ...
3
votes
3answers
604 views

Difference between “ad hoc” and “impromptu” [closed]

Is there any difference between "ad hoc" and "impromptu"? Can you find sentences where only one of the words is acceptable and the other is not? And where they are interchangeable? What about the ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

Upside down vs downside up

Typically when something is reversed or inverted we say it is "upside down", could we also say that it is also "downside up"? For example... "The picture is upside down" could we also say it ...
0
votes
2answers
99 views

Difference between “repress” and “quell” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between repress and quell? Are they interchangeable?
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“Despising look” vs “despised look”

Peter gave me a despising look. Peter gave me a despised look. Are the two statements above the same? My understanding is that in statement 1, I may have done something that Peter thinks ...
0
votes
4answers
124 views

What's the difference between “title” and “name”?

I'm not sure when it's appropriate to use word "name", and when to use word "title". For example, "file name" feels right, "file title" doesn't; "document name" and "document title" seem ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

Difference between speculation and guessing [closed]

The background to this question is in the comments below this answer on Sci-Fi. Is there a difference between "speculating" and "guessing"? My understanding is that they are pretty interchangeable ...
0
votes
1answer
266 views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
0
votes
3answers
99 views

Difference in meaning between “booking is amended” and “booking has been amended” [duplicate]

What is the difference in meaning between "booking is amended" and "booking has been amended"?
1
vote
3answers
245 views

Difference between “wedding” and “marriage”

What is the correct usage between the following? A wedding anniversary A marriage anniversary? What differences are there, if any.
0
votes
4answers
127 views

“former” vs “last” as in “my former, only and last husband”

I was reading a book and found this expression: [...] my former, only and last husband. Could anyone tell me what are the differences between former and last in this case? Also, would former and ...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Simple present or present perfect simple with “WHEN”?

From a native speaker's point of view, are these sentences both gramatically acceptable and equally common in spoken/written English? I'll call you when I get to the gym. I'll call you when I've got ...
3
votes
4answers
305 views

Difference between “larder” and “pantry”

What is the difference between larder and pantry? Is it size? Or content? I found very similar definitions for both terms, something like a room/place in which food is stored. Which of the ...
0
votes
1answer
164 views

What is the difference between “sheer” and “pure” will(power)?

In English, we use the phrase "sheer force" much more often than "pure force" (Google Ngram). And willpower. What is the difference, in meaning and usage, between the two (and is there a reason for ...
2
votes
3answers
340 views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA "word-for-word" has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". "Word-by-word" has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word" (but some with ...
-1
votes
2answers
75 views

coming to the shops or going to the shops? [closed]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Do you mind COMING to the shops with me? Do you mind GOING to the shops with me?
-1
votes
1answer
91 views

present continuous, be going to, or both? [duplicate]

In Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate (Prodromou, 2005), Chapter 2 covers "the future", "be going to", "present continuous", and "present simple". I put three of the End-Of-Chapter questions ...
-1
votes
1answer
162 views

Difference between “at that time” / “that time”

What's the difference between at that time / that time? When I faced the issue previously, at that time John helped us to resolve it. When I faced the issue previously, that time John helped us ...
1
vote
4answers
95 views

what is the difference between a spy and an informer?

Is a "spy" different from an "informer"? If the answer is yes, what differences are there?
0
votes
1answer
101 views

present continuous or be going to?

In his book, Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate, Luck Prodromou has ruled out the possibility of using 'be going to' to complete the following sentence : 'What .......... you .......... ...
1
vote
2answers
244 views

What's the difference between “Conference” and “Meeting”?

See:The meeting will be held in a conference room at 10:00 am. Is there any problem if I change the position of these two words in the sentence like "The conference will be held in a meeting room at ...
3
votes
6answers
980 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
0
votes
3answers
201 views

What's the difference between the words “journey”, “travel” and “trip”?

As they always were interchangeable in an article, I just want to know the difference.
0
votes
2answers
338 views

Difference between mug, jug, jar, etc

When I try to translate the German word "Krug" into English, LEO shows me without further distinction: flagon jar jug mug tankard pitcher But as far as I know, they cannot always used ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Difference between the words of violent criticisms

What is the exact difference between: revile castigate inveigh asperse culminate vituperate vilify In what context are these words used?
1
vote
1answer
92 views

What's the difference between “general” and “generic”?

What is the difference between them? Do they have different meanings? When should I use "general" or "generic"?