2
votes
1answer
119 views

What’s difference between “in” + VERBing compared with just plain VERBing alone?

In the following example from page 145 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer, what would differ if the sentence were to start with Being instead of In being? In being an empirical ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

“What about” vs. ”what of”

Example from page 75 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: But what of mandatory authorities? Are they as “binding” as the traditional terminology suggests? The answer depends on what ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

What’s the difference between “cite” and “cite to”? [closed]

From page 69 of Frederick Shauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New York state court may cite to a case decided in Vermont . . . The courts are not even required to cite to these “authorities,” let ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

“Recover against” vs. “recover from” [closed]

From page 53 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: If Judge Cardozo had said, “We hold that in all cases involving a nonbusiness consumer and a manufacturer of goods, the consumer may ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

disputant vs disputer

Any differences in meaning? The dictionary doesn't explain. Google Ngrams This dispute between the king and the estate of William Bankes, owner of coastal land including Corfe Castle, concerned ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

'pray to someone' vs 'pray someone'

What are the similarities and differences? I had always believed in the first, that 'pray' admits only an indirect object. Yet Google Ngram refutes this. For example, does the following admit of ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Alter vs Modify vs Change (in Legal Documents)

Consider the quote from "What is a Grantor Trust" article. This trust is revocable, which simply means it can be altered, modified, and otherwise changed or even terminated during the life of the ...
1
vote
2answers
891 views

Difference between “deny doing something” and “deny having done something”

What is the difference between "deny doing something" and "deny having done something"? The context is as follows: While being questioned on the court, the man denied [taking/having taken] the ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Difference between “acquittal” and “false accusation” [closed]

I encountered a phrase with a word "acquittal" in a context of criminal law. In Wikipedia, its meaning is described as following: In the common law tradition, an acquittal formally certifies that ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Your signature vs your mark

Is there a difference between your 'signature' and your 'mark'? One of the comments on this post on Bruce Schneier's blog claims there is: This might be out of date in these days of 100% literacy ...
56
votes
8answers
12k views

What's the difference between “null” and “void” in legal language?

In the legal term "null and void," what is the difference between null and void? Why not just use one of the two terms? And can either term be used without the other?
4
votes
1answer
821 views

What are the differences among ‘Rules’, ‘Standing Rules’, and ‘Bylaw’?

Recently I was given a document titled Standing Rules of an English speaking club of a local community, which was written in English, and asked to study the contents. I wondered what difference ...
2
votes
4answers
570 views

How is an “assault” different from “battery” in everyday English?

In legal parlance, the word "assault" historically means an attempted battery (battery being defined as below) or an intentional frightening of another person. No contact is necessary. On the other ...
22
votes
9answers
5k views

Do the words “jail” and “prison” refer to different things?

In everyday speech, the terms jail and prison are used interchangeably in many situations. However, my understanding is that, at least in the US, they actually refer to slightly different things. For ...