0
votes
2answers
163 views

Bunch of girls/Buncha girls

as English isn't my first language, I don't really 'feel' whether bunch of girls/buncha girls is offensive, friendly, etc.? Could you tell me what's the proper meaning of the phrase? I hear it in ...
0
votes
1answer
215 views

“What a shame!” versus “Such a shame!” [closed]

I would like to know the difference between "What a shame!" and "Such a shame!"". When do I use one or the other? I am Brazilian, so I don't know exactly how to use them.
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Difference between “idiom” and “proverb”? [duplicate]

What are the differences between idioms and proverbs?
2
votes
1answer
764 views

“Rich in” vs. “Rich with”

The free dictionary provides two definitions for "rich with" and "rich in". rich with: having a lot of something; abundant in something rich in: having valuable resources, characteristics, ...
0
votes
2answers
238 views

Difference between “sleeping with Sean Parker” and “sleeping on Sean Parker”?

In the movie Social Network, there is a scene where Sean Parker corrected a sentence said by a girl who he just spent a night with: She was rather astonished when she realized the man standing in ...
6
votes
2answers
914 views

“Come Hell or high water” vs “Lord willing and the creek don't rise”

Recently I've wondered about two idioms which have a strange relationship. Come Hell or high water and Lord willing and the creek don't rise Grammatical accuracy, alternative ...
-2
votes
1answer
88 views

Meaning of “in a look of a frame of reference” [closed]

Does "in a look of a frame of reference" mean "regarding to sth."? Sorry, unfortunately I couldn't find a simple example.
1
vote
2answers
289 views

Differences between “Pay attention to” and “Keep an eye on”

What is the difference in meaning between "Pay attention to" and "Keep an eye on"? Can I use both in the same way? Or is one of them stronger than the other?
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“in ages” vs “for ages”

I've always thought I should use "for ages" when, for example, I meet a person who I haven't seen for a long time, but recently I came across another expression, "in ages," as in "I haven't seen you ...
0
votes
3answers
292 views

“in a word” vs “in a sentence”

In a word, you are wrong! In a sentence, you are wrong! Which is more natural? I feel "in a word" is more common than "in a sentence", but "you are wrong!" consists of three words rather ...
0
votes
3answers
553 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
3
votes
0answers
347 views

“Straight ahead” vs. “straight as you go” [closed]

Is straight as you go used often? What is the main difference to straight ahead? I have heard straight ahead in conversations quite a bit, but straight as you go doesn’t ring a bell. Perhaps it ...
1
vote
3answers
163 views

“To like for somebody/something to be something” vs. “to like somebody/something to be something”

Is there any difference between "To like for somebody/something to be something" vs. "to like somebody/something to be something"? In the following case there seems to be a difference, because the ...
8
votes
4answers
31k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the below over others? a) Get hold of, b) Get ahold of, c) Get a hold of
0
votes
2answers
567 views

Subtle distinction between “at once” and “all at once”?

According to OALD both "all at once" and "at once" can mean at the same time. I can't do everything all at once I can't do two things at once. Don't all speak at once! These examples ...
0
votes
1answer
374 views

Can “an act of protest” and “a sign of protest” be used interchangeably? Are they idioms that are synonymous to each other? [closed]

Can "an act of protest" and "a sign of protest" be used interchangeably? Are there contexts where one of these phrases should be used, and not the other? Also, are "act of protest" and "sign of ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

'To take something into account' vs. 'to take something into consideration'

OALD defines the expressions as follows: to take something into account: to consider particular facts, circumstances, etc. when making a decision about something to take something into ...
2
votes
2answers
942 views

What's the difference between “stall” and “stall out”?

Can a car engine stall out? It seems to me that a plane can stall out, but a car can only stall.
3
votes
4answers
2k views

“Human touch” or “humane touch”

We were to give a tagline for a charitable society for underprivileged children. Someone suggested the human touch and within seconds someone modified it to the humane touch. What is the difference ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between 'later' and 'later on'

Is there any difference between the usage of 'later' and 'later on'? I'll see you later. I'll finish it later on.
4
votes
3answers
1k views

When are the phrases “in motion” and “in movement” used?

When are the phrases in motion and in movement used? In motion is the most popular form based on a Google search, but in movement still has 3 080 000 results.
4
votes
3answers
12k views

What's the difference between a proverb and an idiom?

I think I have a notion what is what but maybe you know a good definition what is what? For example "Hindsight is always 20:20" — is that a proverb or an idiom?
5
votes
2answers
524 views

Difference between “pull over” and “pull away”

What is the difference between pull over and pull away? I am still trying to get used to American English. It seems like if I do not understand the driving vocabulary I am going to fail in the driving ...
11
votes
3answers
19k views

Difference between phrase, idiom and expression [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between an expression and a phrase? Difference between “phrase” and “idiom” What is the difference between a phrase, an ...
3
votes
2answers
124 views

“With an (instrument)” and “by (instrument)”

"We forced the door with a jimmy" is idiomatic whereas "The door was forced by jimmy" (Note there is no article after 'by' in this sentence) is also idiomatic. However, "We forced the door by jimmy" ...
10
votes
4answers
9k views

Which is correct: “home in” or “hone in”?

I've heard people say "Home in on something", but I've also heard others say "Hone in on something". Which is the correct expression, and what is the etymology of these?
0
votes
2answers
934 views

Difference between “keep something on”, “hang something on”, and “leave something on”

I came across three verb + on phrases in today’s New York Times article written by Maureen Dowd and titled “Stripped off Dignity”; it dealt with unpleasant airport pat-down practices. In the ...
4
votes
1answer
563 views

Why is “to win over” also called “to one up on”?

Peter Lynch has a book that's called One Up On Wall Street, which probably means "Win Over Wall Street." But why this phrase? Why is it "One Up"? Is there a story behind it? Where does it come from?
2
votes
6answers
2k views

Difference between 'gear up' and 'ready'

Software programmers are gearing up to build applications for the newest version of Windows Phone 7. It seems the 'gear up' in here means 'ready'. So why not use 'ready' and what's the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “out of question” or “out of the question”?

Are they used in different contexts? Those both of them use correct grammar? Google fight shows that "out of the question" appear 10 times more often than the other.
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “to foot the bill” and “to fill the bill”

I already knew the expression, "to foot the bill," and there is also, "to fill the bill." I initially thought this was just a variant, but on closer examination it seems to be an altogether different ...
1
vote
3answers
572 views

“indulger of” vs. “indulger in”

A person can indulge in something. Is he therefore an indulger of something or an indulger in something? Are both okay? If both are okay, is there any difference between these two phrases or are ...
10
votes
4answers
4k views

Difference between “due to” and “thanks to”

When should "due to" be preferred over "thanks to", and vice versa? When can they be used interchangeably?