0
votes
2answers
67 views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
4
votes
2answers
170 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
0
votes
1answer
643 views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
0
votes
4answers
184 views

What is the difference between “leading” and “winning” in a game?

Is it correct to use 'winning' or 'leading' when referring to the current state of a match/game? e.g. for a game between Patriots and Broncos in progress, if Patriots have scored higher points than ...
0
votes
3answers
310 views

Is the use of Simple Past correct in “Although I didn't study for the test, I got a good grade”?

As both actions refer to the past, shouldn't we use Past Perfect to refer to the action that happened first (or rather didn't happen in this particular case)? That is, I am thinking the appropriate ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

Help understanding this sentence structure: “many a congressman was” [duplicate]

Jawaharlal Nehru was the first prime minister of India. Below is a quote from his autobiography. Many a Congressman was a communalist under his national cloak I am sure this sentence is ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

'In the event of fire' or 'in the event of a fire'?

In the event of fire,... In the event of a fire,... I see both variants ondifferent Web pages and I cannot understand which is correct. Could you please explain it to me.
-1
votes
2answers
971 views

What does it mean to say “The greater of _ or _” [closed]

I am reading a document, and it is confusing me and want to be certain of the meaning of this sentence: OUR COMPANY'S TOTAL LIABILITY TO YOU FOR ACTUAL DAMAGES FOR ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER WILL BE ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

What's the difference between an -ing noun and a real noun

Some verbs have corresponding nouns. Also, an '-ing' can be added to create a new noun. For example: Develop is a verb. Development is a noun. Developing is also a noun. So are the sentences ...
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

“Lay on the bed” vs. “lay in the bed” [closed]

Which one is more grammatically correct? I lay on the bed. I lay in the bed.
2
votes
2answers
429 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

What is the actual difference in the following statements [duplicate]

Sentence 1: Many Hindus study Sanskrit,but only a few Parsees study Avesta. Sentence 2: Many Hindus study Sanskrit,but only few Parsees study Avesta. I fail to understand the ...
0
votes
2answers
211 views

“Any” vs. “anything” — are these answers the same? [closed]

Could you please tell me if these sentences are correct and the same? How much luggage do you have? I don't have any. I don't have any luggage. I don't have anything.
3
votes
2answers
330 views

“Every X of mine” VS “My every X”

I'm pretty sure that "Every X of mine" is correct, but reading and speaking out "My every X" makes me feel uncertain about it... is it also correct? If it's not used in formal language or common ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
-1
votes
1answer
442 views

Which of the following sentences are correct?

Can someone please tell me which of the following sentences are correct and which are the differences between them? Prove me wrong. Prove I'm wrong. Prove me I'm wrong. Prove me that I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there any difference between “He won't do something” and “He wouldn't do something”? [closed]

I have read somewhere that He won't do something means He refused to do something and also He wouldn't do something has the same meaning. Now I'd like to know, what is the difference in usage of ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Atop” versus “on top of” [closed]

I'm sure this is silly and won't be terribly difficult to answer: can one climb atop a mountain or is it proper to say climb on top of. Or does it matter? I'm thinking the latter is correct.
3
votes
1answer
263 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
2
votes
3answers
403 views

“Hence the need to make X” vs. “hence the need for X”

Is either of these two sentences correct? If both are correct, is one of them more common than the other? [some arguments...] Hence the need to make an educted guess. [some arguments...] ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“Never saw” versus “didn't ever see”

Do these sentences have different meanings? I never saw such a thing. I didn't ever see such a thing. I never saw him dancing. I didn't ever see him dancing. My ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

“Conformity” vs. “conformance”

I am curious about the differences in meaning, connotations, style, and correctness of using conformity vs conformance. I haven't been able to find much using a simple web search, only a single ...
2
votes
3answers
687 views

Usage of “in here” vs. just “here”

Recently I was watching the Jeeves and Wooster series, when one little but strange thing in a dialogue caught my attention: Wooster: Just one thing. Where do I sleep? Jeeves: In here, sir. Why ...
1
vote
3answers
330 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
8
votes
4answers
398 views

“Dance macabre” or “macabre dance”

The role is the kind of high-wire dare certain types of actors and directors cannot resist. T. Scott Cunningham, who has created a number of lovable losers onstage in the last decade, lets the ...
4
votes
3answers
904 views

“More is welcome” or “More is welcomed”

Which one of the following expressions is grammatical? Please donate $5. More is welcome! Please donate $5. More is welcomed!
-2
votes
2answers
339 views

“After downloaded” vs. “After downloading” [closed]

What is the difference between "After downloaded" and "After downloading"? Are they both grammatical? After downloaded, I start running this program. After downloading, I start running this ...
3
votes
4answers
529 views

Is “He told me not to argue but just agree.” grammatically correct?

He told me not to argue but just agree. I think the sentence above is grammatically correct, but I'm not sure. In fact, I have a hard time choosing between the following sentences: He told ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

“Definitely” vs. “absolutely”

What's the difference between absolutely and definitely? Actually which of the following sentences is correct? You are definitely right. You are absolutely right.
5
votes
2answers
26k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
2
votes
1answer
643 views

Proper use of “context” in a phrase

Which of the following phrases is correct? Everything is in some context. or Everything has some context.
4
votes
1answer
459 views

“I give it to him who came first” vs. “to he who came first” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…” Should the pronoun be "him" because it's the object (gave it to ...
3
votes
6answers
427 views

What’s wrong with “… enforce that …”

The following sentence seems grammatically incorrect to me as a native English speaker (should be ensure, not enforce): People then create laws to enforce that these regulations are being ...
4
votes
2answers
223 views

How should I correctly repeat possessives?

planning of mine, the student and the company planning of mine, the student's, and the company's Which is correct/better, and why? I would assume 2 is correct, but is 1 incorrect?
2
votes
2answers
527 views

'All that' vs 'all what' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “all that” vs. “all what” How can I be sure when to use 'all that' or 'all what' in making sentences. Is there any differences in their meaning. ...
4
votes
1answer
172 views

Should the use of apostrophes be consistent?

It is time to rock, but don't be too loud. Is it recommended to stay consistent with the use of apostrophes? Should it instead be: It's time to rock, but don't be too loud. If that is fine ...
14
votes
5answers
3k views

“Writing things down” vs. “writing things up”

Is there any difference in the usage of "writing things down" vs. "writing things up"? Are they both correct?
1
vote
1answer
904 views

Mixing British and American spellings in writing [closed]

I like color more than colour, but I like favourite more than favorite. For me it is better to write My favourite color is blue. Is it wrong to mix British and American spellings in writing, and ...
3
votes
1answer
15k views

“This” vs “that” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using “that” and “this” interchangeably I wanted to know the differences between this and that. When do you use one or the other? For example: ...
4
votes
3answers
12k views

“Recommend you to” vs. “recommend that you”

I recommend you to define those parameters beforehand. I recommend that you define those parameters beforehand. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If yes, do they mean the same thing? If ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is ...
10
votes
1answer
5k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
2
votes
2answers
825 views

“To be elected chairman” vs. “to be elected the chairman”

I have a question regarding the correct use of the definite article "the": One of my books says: Definite article the is used before nouns denoting a position that can be held by one person ...
5
votes
4answers
6k views

“Me being” versus “my being” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund preceded by possessive pronoun (e.g. “He resents your being more popular than he is”) Until a few months ago, I had always thought that sentences like ...
5
votes
4answers
13k views

When should we use “and” and/or “and/or”?

What's the difference between "and" and "and/or"? How do we decide whether to use one or the other? Note: Also it would be great if someone could explain how do we actually pronounce "and/or" ...
0
votes
2answers
806 views

The phrase, “It's on tonight.”

Is the sentence, "It's on tonight," grammatically correct? What about "It's on for tonight?" Are they both correct? Is there any difference at all?
8
votes
4answers
3k views

What's up with all the words ending with “-eth” in the Bible? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What happened to the “-est” and “-eth” verb suffixes in English? How were they once used? With all this rapture thing going on now, I noticed ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Ideas on” vs. “ideas for”

I'd like to know when to use "ideas on" and "ideas for". I think these are correct: I'd like some ideas on how to improve my team. I'd like some ideas for improving my team. I have some ...
8
votes
7answers
581 views

Why do I so often want to replace “happen” in sentences?

Consider the following variant sentences: Colloquia and seminars both happen in an academic setting. and Colloquia and seminars both occur in an academic setting. Using happen to describe ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “out of question” or “out of the question”?

Are they used in different contexts? Those both of them use correct grammar? Google fight shows that "out of the question" appear 10 times more often than the other.