1
vote
1answer
42 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

some time vs sometime

Is there a rule for "some time" vs "sometime"? For example: Don’t trust your memory to recall noteworthy situations and events some time (sometime) later.
1
vote
0answers
49 views

“Down for” something vs. “Up for” something? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between someone saying they're "down for" something as opposed to being "up for" something? For example: I'm totally up for ice cream tonight! vs. I'm totally down ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

“distinguish them more completely” vs. “more completely distinguish them”

Is there a rule I could tell the difference between: Both A and B have other attributes that distinguish them more completely. Both A and B have other attributes that more completely ...
-2
votes
1answer
958 views

Is “wrongly” even a word? [closed]

I came across a news article using the word wrongly. I was told that wrongly isn't a real word. But I saw this in a leading newspaper and wanted a clarification. Also, what is the difference between ...
-1
votes
2answers
124 views

Placing “first” in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
2
votes
1answer
780 views

“Have you gone” vs. “have you ever gone”

When talking about past experience, what is the difference between these two sentences? Have you gone to Hong Kong? Have you ever gone to Hong Kong?
0
votes
1answer
9k views

“Totally agree” and “completely agree”

What is the difference between totally agree and completely agree? In other words, what is the difference in meaning between totally and completely in such combinations in conversations?
2
votes
1answer
500 views

Is there any difference between nevertheless and never the less?

I saw this on eBay's website: You can sell multiple items that, even though they are against eBay policy, don’t get you caught. Never the less, they are against the rules and can result in ...
1
vote
3answers
842 views

Is there any real difference between “to” as a preposition and “to” as an adverb?

I'm really in doubt. On the free dictionary I read this concept of "to" as a preposition: "1. (used for expressing motion or direction toward a place, person, or thing approached and reached): Come to ...
1
vote
4answers
208 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
1
vote
2answers
984 views

Is there any difference between “stoop down” and “stoop”?

According to Longman, they are the same, but I wonder if this is correct or if so, which one is more common. For example: Dave stooped down to tie his shoes. Dave stooped to tie his shoes. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “so much” and “quite so much”?

I was told that "so much" is more emphatic than "quite so much", but I am not sure. Could you explain the difference between the following pairs of sentences? Don't put so much emphasis on that ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

“First off” vs “first”

First off we need to write down a word; second we need... First we need to write down a word; second we need... What's the subtle difference between "first off" and "first"? Moreover, ...
0
votes
3answers
237 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
-2
votes
1answer
129 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
3
votes
1answer
251 views

Positioning “only” in “I have worked with X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Correct position of “only” Which of the following sentences are correct? I have worked with only Mr. X. I have worked only with Mr. X. I have only worked with ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“Deliberately” vs. “intentionally” vs. “on purpose”

I wonder if there is any difference between usage of these three: deliberately intentionally on purpose Are they completely interchangeable? Are they at the same level of formality? I found some ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

“Thus” vs. “Thusly”

I read an article that used "thusly" and was wondering if there is any grammatical credence to it. The quote: The issue started when Sokolowski quickly ran out of storage capacity in his 32GB ...
5
votes
6answers
4k views

“Hardly” vs. “barely”

I'm from Germany and in German both translate to the same word (kaum). I'd like to know the difference between these two words, hardly and barely.
3
votes
3answers
6k views

the difference between “really” and “very”

Is the statement below true about the difference between really and very when really means “very” in the example “It’s very/really hot in the summer”? “Really” shows more involvement, even ...
3
votes
3answers
972 views

Usage of “already” and “yet”

I want to know the difference between already and yet in this example: I was surprised that they had __ to decide what to do. My answer on this question was already and my teacher marked it as ...
8
votes
4answers
31k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the below over others? a) Get hold of, b) Get ahold of, c) Get a hold of
2
votes
3answers
1k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
-4
votes
1answer
700 views

What's the difference between “technically” and “technologically”? [closed]

What's the difference between technically and technologically? Can you give example sentences which clearly show the difference?
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Would rather [infinitive1] than [infinitive2]” vs. “would rather that [subjunctive]”"

I am aware of sentences like Beth would rather study at the library than go to parties. There is another type of using rather that: She would rather that the plane leave early in the ...
14
votes
5answers
10k views

“Eventually” vs. “finally”

What is the difference between finally and eventually? He eventually escaped and made his way back to England. He finally escaped and made his way back to England.
17
votes
4answers
15k views

“A bit” vs. “a little bit” vs. “a little”

Is there a difference between a bit, a little bit and a little in the following context? He is a little bit angry. He is a little angry. He is a bit angry. Or do these sentences mean the ...
9
votes
3answers
14k views

“Often” and “oftentimes”

Is there any difference between the two terms 'often' and 'oftentimes'? They seem to be used interchangeably but is one more appropriate in certain situations than others? Is 'oftentimes' an older ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Are 'effectually' and 'effectively' completely interchangable?

In the OED: effectively, (adverb)—in such a manner as to achieve a desired result: make sure that resources are used effectively. effectual, (adjective)—successful in producing ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

“Definitely” vs. “absolutely”

What's the difference between absolutely and definitely? Actually which of the following sentences is correct? You are definitely right. You are absolutely right.
11
votes
6answers
112k views

Difference between “supposedly” and “supposably”

What is the difference between supposedly and supposably? Both are real words but seem to have confusingly similar definitions. Supposably: Capable of being supposed : conceivable ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“Always” vs. “forever”

What is the difference between always and forever? Are they synonyms used in different contexts or can they be used interchangeably?
7
votes
2answers
10k views

“Simultaneously” vs “concurrently” [closed]

Coming from a technical background I'm slightly confused. What is the difference between simultaneously and concurrently? How do we use these words?
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Difference between “presently” and “shortly”

What is the difference between presently and shortly? They seem to have rather similar meanings.
3
votes
1answer
7k views

Difference between “no more used” and “no longer used”

You can say not used any more just as readily as not used any longer, but it is no more used seems quite wrong compared to it is no longer used. Why?
2
votes
5answers
979 views

The difference between “to” and “too” explained for German speakers

In German "to" and "too" translate into the same word "zu". It would therefore be great if somebody could clarify when to use which. E.g. Is it "to dazzle" or "too dazzle"? "to dazzling" or "too ...
1
vote
3answers
321 views

Past Simple and Past Perfect Simple with 'already'

Do these two sentences have the same meaning? When we arrived, David had already got home and When we arrived, David was already home
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Usage of “cowardly” and “coward”

I recently discovered that cowardly, which looks like an adverb, is actually also an adjective. So far so good. Then what is the difference between cowardly and coward, and is there any preferential ...
5
votes
2answers
524 views

Difference between “pull over” and “pull away”

What is the difference between pull over and pull away? I am still trying to get used to American English. It seems like if I do not understand the driving vocabulary I am going to fail in the driving ...
3
votes
4answers
8k views

Difference between “instantly” and “instantaneously”

Is there a case in which "instantaneously" can be used in which "instantly" cannot? If not, why does the former exist? If so, what are the circumstances dictating that usage?
6
votes
1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
2
votes
2answers
10k views

“Consequently” versus “consequentially”

What is the difference between consequently and consequentially? My usage being what it is, and also according to the dictionary sample sentences I've found so far (thank you for the helpful comment ...
6
votes
2answers
7k views

Difference between “partly” and “partially”

What is the difference between partly and partially? An example of usage for each word would be great.
6
votes
2answers
10k views

Difference between “recently” and “lately”

I have posted a topic using this sentence: I have picked some fictions to read lately. RegDwight edited this sentence to: I have recently picked up several works of fiction and begun to read ...
2
votes
2answers
204 views

When should I use “parallel” over “parallelism”, and vice versa?

I am a bit confused about the words parallel and parallelism: When and where should one use which?
4
votes
2answers
3k views

“Most every” and “almost every”

What is the difference between "most every" and "almost every"? Do they differ in amount?
28
votes
2answers
9k views

What is the difference between “maybe” and “may be”?

What is the difference in meaning and usage between maybe and may be? Are they synonymous?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

How do I use “verily”?

Since verily means truly or certainly. Can I use it where I would normally use certainly? Like: I certainly think that is appropriate. I verily think that is appropriate. If yes, are there ...