2
votes
1answer
103 views

What is the difference between “super” and “superb”?

I have seen usage of both super and superb. I also searched for meaning of these two words and found they are almost identical. Example sentences - She is a super girl. His performance in the last ...
2
votes
4answers
126 views

“Worried person” vs. “concerned person”

According to H. Stephens, "There is a great difference between worry and concern. A worried person sees a problem, and a concerned person solves a problem". But ODE seems to be disagreeing with him: ...
-3
votes
3answers
94 views

“Evocative” vs. “provocative” [closed]

I am starting to use evocative and provocative interchangeably. I would like to understand the difference between these words and when one should be used instead of the other. although the ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

When to use the abverbial form of maximal: maximally?

Could the following sentence considered to be a correct use case of the adverbial form of the word maximal in English? Use underflow to set the maximally possible value of used datatype. When ...
3
votes
3answers
81 views

'susceptible of' vs 'susceptible to"

What are their similarities and differences? The definitions on http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/susceptible look similar: for example, A is 'influenced or affected' by B, ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“Despising look” vs “despised look”

Peter gave me a despising look. Peter gave me a despised look. Are the two statements above the same? My understanding is that in statement 1, I may have done something that Peter thinks ...
1
vote
1answer
190 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
3
votes
6answers
930 views

Difference between “funny” and “strange”/“weird”

I noticed that in English the word funny is sometimes used in the meaning of strange or weird. What's the exact difference? What is interesting for me is that you have a single word meaning at the ...
1
vote
2answers
451 views

“Conventional” vs. “traditional” [closed]

What is the difference between conventional and traditional? E.g.: My grandfather used to live a conventional/traditional life.
0
votes
1answer
148 views

“Kafkaesque” vs. “Kafkan”

Is there any difference in meaning between the adjectives Kafkaesque and Kafkan, or are they synonyms?
-3
votes
1answer
50 views

custom cutting lumber or custom cut lumber or custom lumber cutting

I know custom picking strawberry, to a certain extent, as I think ,is right. I have confirmed it in google. But here comes the problem: when I try to apply the same structure to "customers can cut the ...
0
votes
5answers
215 views

I want to know the difference between “you are false” and “you are wrong” [closed]

What is the difference between false and wrong? Is there any difference in meaning?
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Does changing the position of an adjective, change the meaning of the sentence?

What are the differences in meaning between these sentences? The weather is hot on the island. The weather on the island is hot. On the island, the weather is hot. Do they mean the ...
2
votes
1answer
313 views

What is the difference between “graduate students” and “postgraduate students”?

I am reading about finding a good university for master studies and I am really confused if graduate students are the same as postgraduate students. Are the terms synonyms, or do they refer to ...
0
votes
1answer
314 views

“Artificial” vs. “faux” vs. “fake”

Do these words have a different meaning? Should we say artificial sugar or sweetener? Should we say artificial fur or faux fur? Is there a rule that defines the border for artificial/faux/fake? ...
2
votes
1answer
345 views

Difference between the adjectives and participles [closed]

What is the difference between an adjective and a participle
6
votes
4answers
3k views

What's the difference between “life conditions” and “living conditions”?

What's the difference between life conditions and living conditions? I often use the former. "The life conditions of the Victorian workers", for example.
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
3
votes
2answers
657 views

What is the difference between “exhausted” and “enervated”?

What is the difference between exhausted and enervated when used to refer to human beings?
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
1
vote
2answers
163 views

“Prodigal” vs. “spendthrift”

What are the differences between the words prodigal and spendthrift? They seem to mean the same. When does one choose to use one over the other?
1
vote
2answers
530 views

“Extended” vs. “extensive” [closed]

What's the difference between these two? I found the following after some research, “Extended” has to do with time, “extensive” with space. An extended tour lasts a long time; an extensive tour ...
3
votes
6answers
3k views

Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”

A friend and I had a disagreement about something, in which he called one of my statements "dumb". As we were talking through the disagreement, it got a little heated and I tried repeating what he had ...
2
votes
3answers
931 views

What's the difference between “erroneous” and “wrong”? [closed]

Are these words totally interchangeable? I made the [erroneous/wrong] decision.
13
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference in usage between “lethal” and “fatal”?

This cropped up when I was in a conversation with a friend. I guess fatal must talk of something which has necessarily resulted in death, while lethality is more about potential to cause death. Yet I ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

When to use “huge” and “big” [closed]

What is the difference between huge and big? For example: He made a huge difference to the team. He made a big difference to the team. Is there a difference in meaning?
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“Interaction technologies” vs. “interactive technologies”

What is your feeling about the differences between the two?
-3
votes
2answers
343 views

“Troublesome” vs. “annoying” [closed]

What is the difference between "troublesome" and "annoying", especially when used to describe a person?
47
votes
14answers
11k views

When to use “nude” and when “naked”

The question is quite clear. Is there any difference (semantically or connotationally, if that's a word) between nude and naked? Nude seems more formal to me, but I'm not quite sure. Interesting: ...
-3
votes
2answers
682 views

What is the difference between “eclectic” and “diverse”?

It seems like eclectic and diverse have the same meaning, but there must be some difference. What is it? Did a search on Google but didn't find any info.
2
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between “skilled” and “skillful”?

What is the difference between skilled and skillful? When can I use one, when can I used the other? He is skilled/​skillful. He is a skilled/​skillful musician. (Anything else?) From the ...
1
vote
2answers
209 views

“number of books” or “book count”?

The number of books is nine. The book count is nine. Which is more natural? What's the SUBTLE difference between them?
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“integer multiple” vs. “integral multiple”

Nine is an integer multiple of three. Nine is an integral multiple of three. Which is more common? If both are accepted, what's the subtle difference between them?
1
vote
2answers
23k views

What is the difference between “phonetic” and “phonemic”? [closed]

I've read several descriptions but I still don't understand. From what I can gather, the main (or only) difference is phonemics is not concerned with "nondistinctive elements" but I don't know what ...
0
votes
2answers
119 views

“Astronomy images” vs. “astronomical images”

Are there any differences between the two? A Google search says that astronomy images is much more used, but I think that astronomical images sounds better.
1
vote
4answers
356 views

Difference between “delight” and “delightful” [closed]

I am wondering if there is really a difference between delight and delightful. I would like to make a title for a French cooking app and was thinking of this: MyApp - Homemade delightful French ...
3
votes
6answers
351 views

“Synchronous events” and “synchronized swimmers” — what is the difference?

In JavaScript, why does synchronous and asynchronous appear to be the opposite to their definition? Synchronous (in JavaScript this refers to running in sequence): occurring at the same time; ...
0
votes
3answers
237 views

“I went to bed hungry” vs. “I went to bed hungrily” [closed]

What is the exact difference between "I went to bed hungry" and "I went to bed hungrily"?
12
votes
7answers
7k views

What's the difference between 'just' and 'fair'?

What's the difference between 'just' and 'fair'? OED gives slightly different definitions, but they are not distinct enough as to be clear (to me). Is the difference simply idiomatic, or is there a ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Differences between “inasmuch as” vs “as much as”

Can anyone provide me with some examples illustrating the differences between mentioned adjectives. Is it possible to use them interchangeably on various occasions?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Continuing” vs. “continued”

So, just a few minutes ago we had this question asking whether one could substitute ongoing availability with continuing availability and what the difference would be, if any. Apart from the question ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the difference between “dichotomous”, “binary”, “boolean”, etc.?

To classify species we use a method called: dichotomous biological key. It works base on true and false cycles. In computer sciences true and fulse working is called boolean and binary is a 0 and 1 ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

“Proxime” vs. “proximate”

When should proxime and proximate be used? Can they be used both to mean spatial as well as temporal nearness? Are they being used differently in British and American English?
0
votes
1answer
328 views

Difference between “hypnotic” and “hypnotizing”

Is there a difference between hypnotic and hypnotizing? I believe they are synonyms but I think of hypnotic as being more metaphorical, and hypnotizing as being used, at least sometimes, as a clinical ...
1
vote
2answers
973 views

Is there a difference between “depressive” and “depressing”?

Is news depressing or depressive? In what situations would you use these two words? According to dicionary.com: depressive - tending to depress depressing - serving to depress; inducing a ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

“True” vs. “right” vs. “correct”

I noticed that, in the dictionary, the words True, Right and Correct can have a meaning resembling accurate or exact. ODO says: True (adj) = accurate or exact. Right (adj) = true or correct as a ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “impossible” and “implausible”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Plausible” vs. “possible” My English-Russian dictionary translates "impossible" and "implausible" absolutely the same. But there must be a difference. Could you ...
18
votes
3answers
4k views

What exactly are the differences between “diligent”, “assiduous” and “sedulous”?

From OALD: sedulous (formal) showing great care and effort in your work synonym: diligent assiduous (formal) working very hard and taking great care that everything is done as well as it ...
0
votes
2answers
678 views

Usage differences between “glum”, “grumpy”, “sulky”, “glower”, and “morose”

I learned from my English book these are synonyms. However I am curious to know what the specific usage of each word is. How much interchangeable are they with each other? Consider the sentence ...
1
vote
3answers
441 views

Usage difference between modest vs decent?

The Dictionary definitions are below: Modest = not excessively large, elaborate, or expensive. Decent = appropriate; fitting Please consider below sentences He has a modest three ...