This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
votes
1answer
17 views

OUT OF BREATH v.s BREATHLESS

What is the difference between 'out of breath' and 'breathless'? I have read the dictionary carefully. I saw an example is that:" We were out of breath after only five minutes''. And 'out of breath' ...
0
votes
3answers
32 views
1
vote
1answer
30 views

What is the difference between “ago” and “before”?

What is the difference between ago and before when they are both used as adverbs in the following sentences: I saw him seven days ago. and I had seen him seven days before.
-1
votes
2answers
37 views

Tell me the difference between whats and what's. [on hold]

I'm trying to make sure that business cards have the right title. I don't want to look like an idiot.
1
vote
2answers
41 views

What's the difference between “imply” and “hint”?

I have a question. What's the difference between these two words, imply and hint? They seem to have the same meaning in definition and if they actually mean the same, which one of them is more ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Responsible of/for? [migrated]

I know that "responsible for" is common but I wonder what happens if I say, "Hitler is responsible of the massacre of Jews"? I think that when one blames someone for something, using "of" makes ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Which is the correct usage when describing something that might happen? [on hold]

When we are describing risks of certain medical procedure, which is the correct usage: Pain increase or worsening of pain?
-1
votes
0answers
45 views

Difference between “till” and “until” [on hold]

I have a question. What's the difference between till and until?
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Using “across” after preposition “to”?

English is not my first language, and I often lose my confidence when I use across in my sentence. Could you please give me an advice on the sentence that I have written below? Health education ...
-2
votes
0answers
50 views

What is the difference between ‘popular’ and ‘famous’? [on hold]

popular liked, admired, or enjoyed by many people or by a particular person or group and famous known about by many people. Oxford Learners Dictionary When should we use popular ...
1
vote
3answers
67 views

I have never understood a word Alice “has said” or “said”

I am not sure about the use of present perfect in the subordinate clause. I want to say I've never understood Alice for as long as I've known her, so should I use the present perfect aspect in the ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”? [on hold]

I found this link explained the difference between "etiquette" and "courtesy", as following the rules and being kind to others. The answer regarded "etiquette" is similar with "manners" If this ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

“He is the instructor for this class” or “of this class”? Does the first one means he is the right person for this class?

I am new here and glad to join this site..It find it very instructive. Are these statements correct? In what context do we use them? He is the instructor for this class==> Does it mean: He is the ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What is the difference between Pharmaceutical and Medicine? [on hold]

Can we use the word "pharmaceutical" exactly as same as "medicine"? For example:1-I bought too many medicines. 2-Medicines nowadays cost a lot. Can we replace the word :medicine/s" with ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Affect or Effect? [on hold]

I still don't really know, despite trying to read the definitions. I believe this sentence is correct but let me know. I seriously wish I could foresee the future and know of all the different ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Difference between “should”, “would” and “ought to”

The sentence: It's essential that the documents should be destroyed immediately. Why can't ought to be used in place of should and why can't I go for would?
-3
votes
0answers
48 views

Why is motherboad called as “motherboard”, not “fatherboard”? [duplicate]

My question is why we call motherboard as motherboard. Why not fatherboard? I am not satisfied with the answer which you provided on your website. Please answer this question.
-1
votes
0answers
52 views

I'm confused with do and does [on hold]

I saw this sentence and I got confused, it says: " You're getting too caught up in things that don't matter." Isn't suppose to be doesn't instead of don't?
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Can I use “could” and “would” in the present tense? [on hold]

Is it correct to say: She speaks so fast that I couldn't understand her.
1
vote
2answers
53 views

Functionality is working “fine” or “as expected”

Here the functionality is related with web Site responses. Now I'm looking for a sentence which would be preferable when, ABC functionality was not working before, (Explanation of some work ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

“You are being it” - why? [closed]

In this video the person says "you are being it" Why did he use present progressive? It seems strange to me, as the verb be in that context does not have any telicity.
1
vote
4answers
60 views

What is the difference between “perpetrator” and “transgressor”? [closed]

I don't quite understand when one might be applied, but not the other. Also, is anyone who committed a transgression a transgressor, or might they also be perpetrators? Does it make a difference? ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [closed]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

Should I use present or past form of structure in a comment? [closed]

I wanted to comment on a website on why I am interested to enroll on a course from the site. Should I say: 1) They provide a well structured courses. or 2) They provide a well structure ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Difference between etymologies of 'allocable' and 'allocatable'

Which one is more proper to use: 'allocable' or 'allocatable'? Sources say the former is derived from the original Latin word 'allocare', while the latter is a part-of-speech-variant of the English ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

The Use of the Present Perfect. What is natural?

Sometimes, I got really confused by the use of the Present Perfect tense. Given the fact, that we don't have this structure in Russian, all we can is to base our knowledge on grammar rules. The ...
2
votes
2answers
44 views

Metaphysician vs Metaphysicist

A practitioner of physics is known as a physicist. It seems like it would logically follow that a practitioner of metaphysics would be known as a metaphysicist; yet, in every text I've read, a ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Word Choice: Starting a sentence with “If not too long ago”

I know that the proper way to use "not too long ago" is: "Not too long ago, contractors used to build houses and sell them to dealers. It was the responsibility of the dealers to provide financing to ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What is the difference between amid and amidst?

I googled it and got the following answer: Amid and amidst are two words meaning the same thing. The meaning of these words is in connection with position of the object, person or situation – in the ...
-1
votes
3answers
70 views

The difference between the phrases “leave the house” and “leave home” [closed]

Good evening! I began to learn English and I am wonder if there is any difference between the phrases "leave the house" and "leave home" (the context is "Usually I get up at 7 o'clock and leave ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
1
vote
2answers
67 views

Difference between Keep on+V-ing and Keep+V-ing

Please help me to find out the answer. Am I right if I say I keep on walking in this dark way? or I keep walking in this dark way? What is the difference between the two sentences?
0
votes
0answers
33 views

What is the difference between 'avoided with the use of' or 'by the use of'?

I am reading a text that refers to a ship accident that caused serious damage to the environment and was partly due to lack of knowledge of maritime English. The related sentence included this ...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

What is the difference between “mourning” and “grieving” someone's death?

It seems to me that both words are interchangeable, I can mourn or grieve the death of a loved one for weeks, months or years. And both terms mean to feel deep sorrow for the loss of someone dear. ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Are “Network Planning” and “Networks Planning” different?

Does the 's' in 'Networks' imply a different meaning, or are the two interchangeable? Thanks!
0
votes
1answer
29 views

“In your time” or “at your time”?

I have a partner who lives sumptuously in a different time zone. I've been wondering which is the correct way of putting it: 11 p.m. in your time or 11 p.m. at your time Thank you!
1
vote
2answers
40 views

Difference between “experiment on” and “experiment with"

I have two sentences: We experiment on both cases. We experiment with both cases. The different preposition will change the meaning. But it's difficult to find such nuances in a dictionary. What ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Difference between “season”, “time of year”, “time of the year”

"Winter, summer, spring and fall are seasons". Is it possible here to use "times of year" meaning "season", like "Winter, summer, spring and fall are times of year"? What is the difference between ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

Further or Farther in a metaphor about a road [duplicate]

In this metaphor is it correct to use "further" or "farther"? That only kicks the can further/farther down the road. Within the metaphor, the distance is physical, justifying the use of ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Difference between “God bless” and “God bless you” [closed]

What is the difference between God bless and God bless you?
-2
votes
2answers
50 views

Difference between “dialect” and “accent” [duplicate]

Please I want to know the difference between the two words( dialect and accent)
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Should I use 'leitmotifs', the plural of leitmotif, in academic English?

Should I, in an scientific book, use the word 'leitmotifs', the plural of leitmotif? Some dictionaries seem to know it in the plural form, but does it sound very weird or massively pretentious to the ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

I hope you get better vs. I hope you will get better

I'm an English speaker, and someone asked me why we say: I hope you get better soon. rather than I hope you will get better soon. Technically, you can say both. But why is the first ("I ...
-1
votes
1answer
29 views

If you will have vs If you have

If you will have dinner at home, tell me. or If you have dinner at home, tell me. What is the difference between the two sentences? Which one sounds natural?
4
votes
5answers
213 views

Is it correct to use “most” + “-est” together?

I was over exaggerating while writing something for class and I wrote Welcome to the most wildest show on earth. Someone pointed out the most wildest and I was wondering if it was OK to use ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Why do we sometimes add extra “of” after “outside”? [duplicate]

When Jamie Foxx heard a car crash outside of his house, he rushed to help. Why does the sentence say "outside of his house" instead of "outside his house"? Why does it have this extra of?
11
votes
5answers
2k views

'Nobody' vs 'No body' [closed]

What is the difference between Nobody and No body? Both have same meaning. Nobody is used as a pronoun. For example, Nobody is going there. Nobody as a noun. For example, He became Nobody ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

“There is nothing like that” vs “There is no such thing” vs “There is nothing similar”

What's the difference in meaning (if any) between these three sentences? Could you give some examples of common situations when you'd use one and no the others?
0
votes
2answers
22 views

“High-paying occupation” vs “high-paying job or position”

I am a beginner of English and my native language is Chinese. I just wonder why I can't use high-paying occupation? My teacher suggests that using high-paying job or position is much more ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

“Snatch a nap”/“take a nap”/“have a nap”

Can we say "to snatch a nap"? If it's possible then Is there any difference between "snatch a nap", "take a nap" and "have a nap"?