This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0answers
12 views

Evaluative vs. Normative

What is the difference between the words "evaluative" and "normative"? The former means, according to the OED, "of, pertaining to, or tending to evaluation; appraisive, estimative." How is this ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

wasn't v.s. was not

I'd like to know whehther there are any differences/nuances in meaning between "wasn't" and "was not". Examples are: I wasn't there I was not there And: She insisted she wasn't soft on Russia She ...
-1
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1answer
14 views

What are the differences of store(n.) and storage(n.)?

Store ex: The store's inventory has to be entered manually into the database. Storage ex: Storage closet is where you will find all our office supplies.
0
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1answer
25 views

What's the difference between unapproachable and inapproachable?

Could anyone explain why does it have two versions, because as far as I know, there are some rules of formation of antonyms. Isn't there should be only one proper prefix? Or both are possible? Thank ...
2
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3answers
53 views

I can make it, I will leave. What's the precedence and ambiguity?

Here's a scenario. I am confounded when after a discussion with a friend, they arrive at my place on Saturday, here's the transcript. her: I can make it on Saturday. me: Ok, see you then anytime! ...
0
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2answers
78 views

Is 'surely' the same as 'certainly'

Dictionaries provide the following- surely/ˈʃʊəli,ˈʃɔːli/ adverb, used to emphasize the speaker's firm belief that what they are saying is true and often their surprise that there is any doubt ...
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0answers
37 views

What is the difference between “specialist” and “expert”? [on hold]

What is the difference between "specialist" and "expert"? I want to know the difference in detail
2
votes
1answer
43 views

outside vs out of the box [duplicate]

As a non native english speaker i wonder which one is the correct form to use ? to think outside the box ? to think out of the box ? is there any difference in meaning ?
0
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0answers
47 views

Different words for educational problems [on hold]

What is the difference between the following words (terms) in a context of education (online education in particular)? Quiz Exercise Assignment Problem Question Which one is more proper to use as ...
0
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0answers
32 views

CEO or Managing Director [duplicate]

For a small consulting firm, is it appropriate to use CEO or Managing Director as the owner of the business?
0
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2answers
63 views

“Prefer to do something” vs. “would prefer to do something”

Are these sentences different? "I prefer to walk." "I'd (would) prefer to walk." In some books I read one is used in general and the other in specific situations. So when you say "I prefer coffee ...
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1answer
36 views

difference between DISTINGUISH and DISCRIMINATE [closed]

What is the difference between these words "Discriminate Distinguish and Differentiate" ? Thank you,JP
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0answers
31 views

Should I use Destination School or School Destination? [on hold]

I am writing a article on classified website. And I need to use Destination School or School Destination in one of the sentence. Which one is appropriate?
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1answer
68 views

Which one is correct? Are they correct at all? [closed]

Are they correct? Where is mistake if the are not? Is it necessary to use word "already"? 1.By the 25th of May Sally and Bob will have already agreed about schedule of their meetings. 2.Sally and ...
0
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0answers
26 views

Difference between lateness, tardiness, and laxity? [closed]

Can someone please explain the subtle difference between these terms?
1
vote
1answer
35 views

What's the difference between amusing and diverting?

I was watching Flushed Away (2006) . In one scene (00:20:46) The Toad says I know you'll find it diverting. and a minute later (00:21:57) Roddy says : Yes. I'd love to see more of your ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Difference between I see and I understand [closed]

What's the difference between "I see" and "I understand" ?
13
votes
3answers
1k views

Past tense of wake: is there a difference between “waked”, and “woke”?

I just stumbled over the verb "to wake", which according to various sources has two valid forms for the past tense: "woke" and "waked". Some further research stated, that there seem to be two (Old / ...
1
vote
3answers
80 views

Is there any similarity between “revolving door” in politics and revolving door for entering or exiting the buildings?

These are different definitions of "revolving door", please tell me how do they relate to each other? 1-A door, especially at the entrance of a building, typically made of three or four rigid upright ...
1
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0answers
57 views

Formal and Informal Minutes of Meeting [closed]

What is the difference between formal and informal minutes of meeting. I know that formal minutes are often required by federal, state, or local law, by-laws, charters, or regulations but what about ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

What is the usage difference between dilemma and quandary

Between dilemma and quandary, what are the various denotations and connotations. A dilemma is a difficult choice, not just any difficulty or problem. The dictionaries put them as synonyms. ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

… to feel sick Tuesday afternoon / on Tuesday afternoon / from Tuesday afternoon. Which one is correct?

Are they all correct? He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick on Tuesday afternoon. ...
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0answers
20 views

Using “is” or “does”? [migrated]

Which one is correct. This is the title of my blog. Is arrival of virtual router, a death knell for physical router. Does arrival of virtual router, a death knell for physical router. Second ...
1
vote
3answers
52 views

How much does “can” change my meaning?

How much of a difference in meaning is there between these three sentences, and are any of them better suited to formal writing than the others? They must [do things] before they can begin to ...
4
votes
3answers
188 views

How was 'hone in on' bastardised to mean 'home in on'?

The comments under this CBC article impelled me to check the definitions of the verbs home in on, under which a para discusses this debasement, vs hone in on. Yet it doesn't explain this corruption's ...
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votes
1answer
31 views

Difference between “turns out” and “turns out to be”

I'm not a native English speaker, hence I'm a little confused here. I want to know the difference between the two and also correct me if I'm saying it wrong here "It's turns out to be a conspiracy ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

'by which' vs 'by the which'

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
2
votes
4answers
154 views

Difference between 'to the left' and 'on the left'

I have encountered these expressions today, when I was describing a photo. People are lining up in the picture. I wanted to explain someone who is standing next to the person on the far left. And I ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“How…?” vs. “What … like?”

In the Longman Dictionary of Common Errors you read "When you ask for or give a description of someone or something, use what ... like (NOT how): 'What's your new teacher like?' But I sometimes hear ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Canny means shrewd or wise how does uncanny turn out to be mysterious? [closed]

Canny means 'shrewd' while uncanny means mysterious. How?
1
vote
0answers
92 views

Differences between “How are you?”, “How are you doing?” and “How do you do?” [migrated]

What are the main differences between the three sentences written below? When should we use these greetings? 1) How are you? 2) How are you doing? 3) How do you do?
0
votes
2answers
78 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

This might turn out unnecessary vs This might turn out to be unnecessary

Which of the two expressions is correct? Is there any difference
2
votes
1answer
227 views

“Speak English” vs. “speak in English”

What is the difference between Speak English and Speak in English? Which one is (more) acceptable in this sentence: "You must speak English/ in English in class." Or, are both correct? If yes, what ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What is the semantical difference between reliable and trustworthy?

When one literally translates the Dutch word betrouw-baar (dash added) one gets trust-worthy (dash added). But when one uses Google translate, it generates reliable. Based on my experience with ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

“Traffic rules” vs. “traffic regulations” [closed]

Which one is correct, "traffic rules" or "traffic regulations"? If both are correct, what is the difference between them?
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Questions about “get” vs. “was given” and the Passive Voice

What is the difference in meaning between got and was given? I understand that got is in the active voice, was given is in the passive voice, and that they are different verbs. But what is the ...
1
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3answers
105 views

“to prefer something over something” or “to prefer something to something” [duplicate]

Which syntax is more correct: to prefer something over something else or to prefer something to something else or maybe both are correct?
1
vote
3answers
452 views

The rules of the game vs. the laws of the game

Do rule and law have the same meaning when you talk about an activity like a game? I came across this sentence in the Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's Dictionay: "Match officials should not ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

“like” vs. “as” Confusion in a sentence

Which is the correct sentence between the following: 1) He deserves the same fate as you 2) He deserves the same fate like you. From my knowledge and understanding, the second sentence is correct ...
0
votes
3answers
81 views

What is difference between <At the end / In the end>?

Can we use each of these sentences in everywhere or no?! It mean do they have different meanings?! Ex: I don't wanted to take sides, but in the end I had to. Or, I don't wanted to take sides, but at ...
11
votes
4answers
944 views

Are “smell like” and “smell of” the same?

Is there any difference between smell like and smell of? I came across this sentence in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary: My hands smell like (US) / of (UK) onion. But I'm not really ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

What are the difference between “details” and “information”?

I am confused of how to use them and their difference. To have better understanding for both readers and me, please categorise this these factors to the appropriate category ("details" and ...
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votes
2answers
181 views

Words that change meaning when a letter is added/removed/changed

Want to know if there is a collective word to describe these kind of words that change their meanings in an opposite way (rather than irrelevantly) when a single letter is added/removed/changed so ...
0
votes
3answers
76 views

What are the difference between “prominent” and “VIP”? [closed]

The definition of prominent and VIP are same: an important person So if I say: Mai is a prominent guy of Australia OR Mai is a V.I.P. of Australia. Isn't the meaning is the same?
4
votes
3answers
472 views

Roundel vs Roundabout [closed]

What, if any, is the difference between the two? My best guess is that a 'roundel' is the traffic island or structure that you drive around, while the 'roundabout' also includes the road you're ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

Past Simple vs. Past Progressive

I've been noticing in conversations that people often use past or present or future progressive where I would normally use past, present or future simple. I know some rules about interrupted actions ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

When do we use “elder” “older” and “eldest”?

I'd appreciate it if someone explained everything regarding those three adjectives. They confuse me.
0
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1answer
57 views

“get one's head around” vs “get one's arms around”

I have seen both idioms used in practice. The definitions I found, http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+arms+around, and http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+head+around don't indicate much ...