This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
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2answers
27 views

Tallest vs Loftiest

How is the usage of the two words different? I think they mean one and the same. Are they?
0
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0answers
19 views

What is This “if”? [on hold]

He could not believe that, had the Englishman known how much he was at risk, he would have hazarded his grandson. - 1)If the English man had known how much he(Englishman) was at risk, he would have ...
1
vote
3answers
78 views

What's the difference between e.g. “room 5” and “number 5”?

Is it correct to use the word ‘number’ meaning "hotel room'? Thanks in advance.
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the difference between a forefather and an ancestor?

Stumbled upon this question today while going through synonyms of various terms. I was advised that they are not synonymous to each other. Please advise.
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct? [duplicate]

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct?. In some published papers, I either see 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' used in some sentences or phrases. Can someone justify and comment?
-3
votes
0answers
166 views

First, second and third conditional [migrated]

I found this sentence in my workbook: If you were a king, what'd your wife be called?" Why was the ‘second conditional’ used here? That situation is completely impossible, so I think, it ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Difference between “doesn't seem to rain” & “doesn't seem to be raining” [closed]

What's the difference between 'It doesn't seem to rain.' and 'It doesn't seem to be raining.' ? Is it that the first means "the rain didn't occur often", and the second means "it doesn't rain in the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Problems with the meanings of the words 'already' and 'yet'

I have a problem with understanding the difference between 'already' and 'yet'. Are these examples correct and do they mean the same? Have they already done it? Have they done it yet? ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Amass vs accumulate - is there a difference or can these be used interchangeably?

These two words mean pretty much the same thing. But I couldn't understand the difference. I picked these two examples from google translate: investigators have yet to accumulate enough ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning or usage between slightly and a bit? For example, the sentence: I thought she was younger than me, but in fact she proved to be even slightly older. Is ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

The Difference Between “not unknown to” and “known to”?

An non-native English-speaking friend of mine came across the phrase "not unknown to" as in "tragedy is not unknown to the Kennedy family" and asked the question, "What's the difference between 'not ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

a “piece” vs. an “item” of clothing

What is the difference between an item of clothing and a piece of clothing? Can I say "three pieces of clothing" or "three items of clothing"? Are they used identically?
0
votes
2answers
48 views

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed'?

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed', As both words gives the same meaning. Ex 1: He finished his homework. Ex 2: He completed his homework. And also how to use or ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

What's the difference between “zero in” and “home in”?

According to Oxford dictionary, both seem to mean "focus on" or "aim at" zero in: Take aim with a gun or missile/Focus one’s attention. home in: Move or be aimed toward (a target or destination) with ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Difference between “on the level” and “at the level”

Specifically I'd like to know when you would say "at the behavioral level" and when "on the behavioral level." It feels like there is a difference, but I can't put my finger on it.
0
votes
2answers
58 views

Give some examples using “food, cuisine, dish, menu and ingredient” [closed]

I have troubles using some words about food and I cannot feel the subtle differences of their usage. I'd like to get some help with examples using these various words. Food Cuisine dishes menu meal ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as "the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance" Why is it stated ...
1
vote
3answers
39 views

Hyperbolic vs Hyperbolical

I just looked up the word "hyperbolic" in the 3rd edition of "The New Oxford American Dictionary", and the second definition says "(of language) exaggerated; hyperbolical." When I go to hyperbolical, ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

usage of dissimilar

This sentence is grammatically correct. But does it make sense to use word dissimilar to avoid repetition of different here? the results would be absolutely dissimilar if there is any slight ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Linguistic typology of isochrony and intonation [migrated]

I don't have much of a background in linguistics, and I can't tell if some of the terms I am seeing are overloaded or unique in meaning. Specifically, I've been told that language timing can be ...
-2
votes
2answers
60 views

What is the difference between Assumption and Assertion? [closed]

How does assume differs from assert? Looking for a explanation with an example statement for both (it's better if the example statements are in the same context).
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What are the difference between knelt and kneeled?

kneeled (Dictionary.com): to go down or rest on the knees or a knee. knelt (Dictionary.com): a simple past tense and past participle of kneel.
5
votes
1answer
72 views

How did “Matron” and “Patron” come to mean different things?

Matron: (1) a married woman, especially one who is mature and staid or dignified and has an established social position; (2) a woman who has charge of the domestic affairs of a hospital, prison, or ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Exhortation v. Hortation - difference

Exhortation v. Hortation Are there any difference in (a) the usage and (b) the meaning of the two? It seems to me that Hortation is an obsolete word because in OED there is only a very brief ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Fight + preposition (with, over, about, against)

At first glance, I thought fight was an easy verb, then things started to get complicated: I fought with my brother for the bed. I fought with my brother over the bed. Here, for instance, over ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Devoid and Lack

I often found it hard to use "devoid" naturally and correctly. And most of the times it seems to me that replacing "devoid" by "lacking" sounds more natural. The question is lacking meaning The ...
0
votes
3answers
61 views

'limit' vs 'limitation' [closed]

What are the similarities and differences? I already tried the OED, but its richness (ie plenitude) of information can overwhelm me, a novice. I heed the Etymological Fallacy, but does etymology help ...
-4
votes
0answers
35 views

What is different between look, see and watch [migrated]

I have confusion about following words because it's Gujarati meaning for all are same. What is actual difference between following words Look, See, Watch If possible then explain with example.
3
votes
2answers
86 views

What's the difference between a House and a Dynasty?

Why is it called "House of Plantagenet" or "House of Lancaster", instead of "Dynasty of Plantagenet" or "Dynasty of Lancaster"? What's the difference between house and dynasty?
1
vote
4answers
85 views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
1
vote
1answer
86 views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Grandmother / Grandma

I have a question. Is it normal(common) for about 30-year-old man to call his grandmother 'grandma'? Doesn't he sound like a kid if using 'grandma'? Please help me! Thank you in advance.
5
votes
2answers
63 views

Difference between defray, sponsor, and fund?

What is the difference between defray, sponsor, and fund (all verbs)? For me, they are interchangeable: Oxford Dictionary: Defray: Provide money to pay (a cost or expense) The proceeds ...
-1
votes
3answers
74 views

presenter vs speaker

I am organizing a seminar but i wonder how to address the person who presents the presentation in that seminar. presenter or speaker? What is difference between presenter and speaker? Are they ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

“Do not rely” on something, does rely focus on never using “something”?

So, I was talking with a friend of mine a little while back about what "relying" on something means. His take was that to "rely" on something was to completely depend on the "something", as in only ...
0
votes
1answer
183 views

Difference between Co-curricular activities and Extra-curricular activities and Hobby [closed]

What is the difference between these fields in a resume primarily Co-curricular activities and Extra-curricular activities ; Extra-curricular activities and Hobby. I wan to know The meaning and usage ...
1
vote
4answers
109 views

“dead brother's grandson” VS “passed-away brother's grandson”

One is dead brother's grandson (and) dead sister's grandson. The other is passed-away brother's grandson (and) passed-away sister's grandson. They come from part of a novel which I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Difference - Cognition and Recognition [closed]

What is the exact difference between the two?
0
votes
1answer
33 views

difference in meaning depending on placement of “already” [duplicate]

Maybe the bus already left. Maybe the bus has already left. Maybe the bus has left already. I am not a native speaker so don't know if there is any difference among those three sentences, not ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Why do people say “Cut and paste” instead of “Copy and paste”?

I often see "cut and paste" used over "copy and paste" in the context of computers and word processing. I also see "cut and paste" and CTRL-C+CTRL-V used interchangeably when CTRL-X is the actual ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

What are the differences between “impolite” and “unpolite”?

Definition of impolite in OD: not having or showing good manners; rude. Definition of unpolite in TFD: Not polite; impolite; rude.
0
votes
2answers
53 views

What's the difference between “insulated” and “isolated”? [closed]

I don't know the difference because they have the same meaning.
2
votes
1answer
132 views

“The man in glasses” or “The man with glasses”? [closed]

The man in glasses or The man with glasses Is it grammatically correct to say with or in glasses? I've heard both, but the first seems to prevail a little bit more, though. Googling ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

Difference between near, nearby and close

Could you tell me a ( near - nearby - close ) pharmacy? I live ( near - nearby - close ) to the bank. Don't leave. I'm (near - nearby - close ). Do you think that they ...
3
votes
3answers
77 views

How can “for” be classed as a coördinating conjunction in the following instances?

How can for be classed as a coördinating conjunction in the following instances? I cannot give you any money, for I have none. He deserved to succeed, for he worked hard. Blessed are the merciful, ...
-2
votes
1answer
75 views

Will / Going to [duplicate]

I'm having some troubles with the usage of will and going to in the future tense. I have searched this problem all over Google, but I can't seem to find the universal explanation (for example, one ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

craft with -ing or not? [closed]

I've seen 'coding craft': http://www.codingcraft.co.uk/ and 'hire craft': http://hirecraft.com/ what's the correct version? why not 'hiring craft'? what's the difference?
1
vote
1answer
149 views

Is the perfect aspect used differently in Indian English compared to AmEng and BrEng? [closed]

Some people in India speak English but there's differences. But to what extent does it differ in perfect tenses like present, past, future, etc. perfect? I choose to compare it with British English ...
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

Could “Give in” mean “Hand over”? [closed]

Give in = hand in but does give in = hand over? and which of them are equal? and what's the differences?