This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0
votes
1answer
35 views

“get one's head around” vs “get one's arms around”

I have seen both idioms used in practice. The definitions I found, http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+arms+around, and http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+head+around don't indicate much ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Difference between 'get at' and 'get on at'

E.g. 'My boss is always getting on at me even if I haven't done anything wrong.' 'Her parents keep getting at her for skipping classes.' I'm wondering whether these phrasal verbs have ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

“replace” vs. “substitute”

When you replace somebody with somebody else, does it refer to a permanent change usually for a better one? In "The company replaced Alice with a new secretary", does it refer to a permanent change? ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

What is the difference between 'same' and 'identical'? [on hold]

As far as I know, these two words (same and identical) have exactly the same meaning. Is there actually any difference between them?
4
votes
2answers
75 views

Difference between “abate” and “bate”

What is the difference between abate and bate? How are they used differently? Do they both mean the same thing? (from the Free Dictionary) The definition of abate is 'to reduce in amount, degree, or ...
5
votes
3answers
78 views

Difference between an “issue” and a “challenge” [on hold]

I've often heard the question asked, "What are the challenges and issues faced in implementing X technology?" or "What are the challenges and issues faced by X?". Do challenges and issues mean the ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

“it is good” and “that is good” [migrated]

What is the difference between it is good that is good
1
vote
3answers
56 views

“characteristic” vs. “typical”

What is the difference between characteristic and typical? I've seen that they both are used with kinda the same structure (be characteristic/typical of sb/sth) Like: "This hospitality is ...
1
vote
3answers
59 views

What is the difference between “He is polite” and “He is being polite”?

Can any one please explain the usage and meaning of "He is polite" and "He is being polite".
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Difference between philistine and anti-intellectual [closed]

Is philistine simply a more archaic usage ? Is a philistine a more specific kind of anti-intellectual ? Or are they interchangeable ? Research: OED: Anti-intellectual: NOUN A person who scorns ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

difference between emigrate, immigrate, and migrate? [closed]

what is the difference between emigrate, immigrate, and migrate? I am pretty much confused.
2
votes
2answers
38 views

When to use “in” and “at”

when do I use "in" and "at" in a sentence? for example is "I will coming to learn English in India or At India"
7
votes
1answer
244 views

What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?

There are a number of words that mean "generally believed to be true but not necessarily true" but their connotations differ tremendously. Some examples of these are allegedly putatively ...
2
votes
3answers
70 views

Difference between obfuscate and obscure?

I see the words used in the same situations. Is there a particular difference that would help me understand when each one should be used? Etymology Obfuscate Latin fuscus for dark Etymology Obscure ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

If you have/had/did not + verb + yet

What is the correct sentence(s) in those : 1 If you haven't read this yet, I recommend doing it. 2 If you had not read this yet, I recommend doing it. 3 If you didn't read this yet, ...
2
votes
4answers
70 views

“No worry” vs. “No worries”

I'm confused which one is correct. Do they have the same meaning? Or different in various contexts? Thanks!
4
votes
3answers
117 views

Therefore vs. wherefore [closed]

I saw these words in The Silmarillion: Then there was unrest among the Ainur; but Ilúvatar called to them, and said: ‘I know the desire of your minds that what ye have seen should verily be, not ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

gone vs. due (words refering to pregnancy)

You hear sentences like "How far gone is she?" Or "When is she due?" Used to talk about pregnancy... A few days ago one of my collegues used the sentence "How long is she due?" and insisted that it's ...
5
votes
2answers
95 views

Why “pastime” but not “passtime”?

pastime n. An activity that occupies one's spare time pleasantly: Sailing is her favorite pastime. [TFD] Etymonline says that it is from pass + time: late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

“Tickle Monster” vs. “Tickling Monster”

My small kids like tickling - we play a "Tickle Monster" game. I am wondering, is there any difference between word pairs like tickle monster vs. tickling monster tickle machine vs. tickling machine ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Is there a fraction prefix for “(one-)third”?

I am a mathematician, working with things called 1⁄k-regular polytopes, dubbed thus by Conway. For the case of k = 2, as in ½-regular, it is naturally pronounced and written half-regular. However, I ...
0
votes
3answers
129 views

Difference between “She is hot” and “Hot she is”? [closed]

Is there any difference on these two usages "She is hot" and "Hot she is" ??
2
votes
3answers
54 views

Expiry or expiration?

Do these 2 sentences have particular reasons? Could we use both? A. Not less than 30 days of the expiration. B. Not less than 30 days of the expiry date.
2
votes
2answers
81 views

the usage of “former”

You can say he's a former teacher, to refer to someone who used to be a teacher but not now. But can we say "your former teacher" to refer to "your last teacher"? Are the both the same or is there a ...
3
votes
2answers
106 views

Which rules define how to pronounce a consonant? [closed]

My question might appear silly and pointless to some, but I find it pretty interesting myself. If we look at the word 'circus', it has 3 consonants and 2 vowels. However, the 2 c in the words are ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

What are the effects of word order in cause and effect sentences?

What are the differences between cause-and-effect sentences in which the causal agent precedes or follows its result? Both forms can be syntactically correct, but this question is concerned with their ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

In spite vs Out of spite

Do these two sentences below mean basically the same? He spoke out of spite. He spoke in spite. Would there be a nuance, what would it be? Thanks.
2
votes
3answers
81 views

wrinkle vs. crease

What is the difference between 'wrinkle' and 'crease' talking about skin? Can we say 'wrinkles' form as you get old, and 'creases' form when you move part of your face? Like when you laugh and laugh ...
-1
votes
0answers
42 views

when I should use “on” or “at”? [migrated]

I was at doctor office few days back and there was lady who was trying to come in the office.But couldn't as the door was locked. I told the nurse there that "somebody is on the door" and she replied ...
1
vote
3answers
59 views

Difference between facilities and installations

If we are talking about electrical installations, when would you use "installations" vs "facilities". The Merriam Webster dictionary defines facilities as "something (such as a building or large ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

“More than necessary” vs. “more than are necessary”

Don't buy more books than are necessary. Don't buy more books than necessary. We have three more doctors than are necessary. We have three more doctors than necessary. ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

What is difference between it and that? [closed]

every time I speak I'm confused about using it or that. For example I want to say: I'll see that. and I don't know what happen if I say: I'll see it. Can you please describe for me with some examples. ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Difference between “Aligned with” vs “In Alignment With”?

Is there a difference between "aligned with" vs "in alignment with" ? Context: you will align US with OUR Inner Truth; clearing all the ways and reasons WE may not be in alignment with OUR Inner ...
8
votes
3answers
659 views

What is the difference between Backronym and Acronym?

Are Backronym and Acronym same? I don't understand the difference between these two terms.
1
vote
2answers
60 views

“that which” vs. “what”

What's the difference between "that which" and "what"? Which of the following sentences is correct, and how (if at all) do they differ? We only want to free technology from that which makes it ...
1
vote
2answers
118 views

“I'm migrating to Australia” or “I'm immigrating to Australia”? [duplicate]

I am confused as to which is the correct way of saying I am migrating to Australia OR I am immigrating to Australia Which one is appropriate?
-2
votes
1answer
69 views

I like “the” music or I like music? [duplicate]

I like music. I like the music. I know the difference between the previous two sentences is that 'the music' is specifically talking about a music. Is there any more difference in meaning? Can you ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Difference between these two sentences?

"How do I suppose to have a garden at home?" "How am I supposed to have a garden at home?" Is there any differences?
0
votes
0answers
60 views

What's the difference between “to brag” and “to boast”

Sometimes this words are used interchanged in just two consecutive sentences, therefore I don't expect there to be a big and obvious difference. Nevertheless, since people use the English language, ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Difference between the prefixes, “mis” and “dis” [duplicate]

What is the difference between mistrust and distrust?
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Monochrome vs. Monochromatic

What is the usage difference for the words monochrome (as an adjective) and monochromatic? Various dictionaries seem to have nearly identical definitions for the two words.
0
votes
1answer
74 views

The difference between 'gonna have to' and 'will have to'

Can anyone explain the difference between 'will have to' and 'gonna have to', please? I'm not native speaker and these statements seem exactly the same to me.
0
votes
1answer
77 views

What is the difference between supposed to and meant to

It is because it was always meant to be so. It is because it was always supposed to be so. What is the difference between meant and supposed? There must be more but all I can deconstruct ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Distress vs anguish

Is there any difference between the words (nouns) distress and anguish? They seem to be quite similar.
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

Is it right say Invest on? [closed]

Is it correct idiomatically to say "invest on?" For example, "Invest on Peter " [a person].
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Is there a difference between “scaffold” and “scaffolding”?

Apparently scaffolding is always a substantive while scaffold can be used both as substantive and as verb (to scaffold). I'm interested in the substantive meaning of both words. Google image ...
0
votes
3answers
116 views

Break up vs breakup vs break down

I needed to break up the tasks of an estimate. I needed to breakup the tasks of an estimate. I needed to break down the tasks of an estimate. Which one of the above is correct and Why? When to use ...
0
votes
2answers
187 views

“is no longer working” vs “does not work anymore”

Mr.John does not work in plaza hotel, anymore vs Mr.John is no longer working at plaza hotel Which one is correct to say? If he's not working, currently.
1
vote
3answers
154 views

“make a change” or “make a difference”

I was reading a book with tests when I encountered this question: < "If you quit your job, you'll have to make do with fewer material possessions. Those who've decided to (make a change/make a ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

What is the difference between “unfeasible” and “infeasible”?

Both "unfeasible" and "infeasible" are words according to spell-check, and they appear have similar dictionary definitions. But what is the difference between the two words? Is one more acceptable to ...