This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

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0answers
17 views

bleed inside out/got-have got

I've been wondering if there is the expression "I bleed inside out" or if it is correct. For example "someone or something makes me bleed inside out" - as we say "it breaks my heart". And actually I ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Writing one academic year to another academic year

I am a bit confused. When do we write 2014-2015 and when do we write 2014-15? Are the two the same? If yes, which is more formal?
0
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0answers
23 views

Open/Closed vs Open/Close [closed]

I recently saw a video of a sign that converts from the word 'open' to 'close' But I was wondering why in shops you can see the signs say 'OPEN / CLOSED' instead of 'OPEN / CLOSE' Are they both ...
1
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2answers
58 views

What is the difference between “I have specialized” and “I have been specializing”? [closed]

Since then I have specialised in this work. Since then I have been specialising in this work. Is my thinking right that the first case means I may not now necessarily specialise only in this work, ...
1
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2answers
48 views

What is the difference between “launch” and “release” ?

I have doubt in differencing "launch" and "release". I have seen many softwares. Some of them uses "launch" and rest uses "release". Someone help me to figure it out.
0
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1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “determining” and “analysing” [closed]

Do "determining" and "analysing" have different meanings? What is the difference between "determining" and "analysing"? [...] while analysing current price characteristics. [...] while determining ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Meaning difference when a word can be both a Noun and an Adjective

Does the meaning of "unknown" change depending on whether it is used as a noun or an adjective? The cause is still unknown. The cause is still an unknown. Although "unknown" is used as ...
2
votes
2answers
46 views

The difference between 'credit' and 'accredit'?

Both verbs seem to mean the same thing -- to attribute 'X' to Mr. 'Y'. On looking it up, I found: credit - publicly acknowledge a contributor's role in the production of (something published or ...
0
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1answer
23 views

Send or Send across

How the words send and send across are used in email writing context? What are difference between these two? You can send your profile to 123@abc.com. Or You can send across your profiles ...
0
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0answers
14 views

“elected” vs. “selected” [duplicate]

The board has elected the team members OR The board has selected the team members. Is there a difference between elected and selected in this sentence?
-5
votes
1answer
73 views

Is appeal correctly said in this sentence? [closed]

Is appeal correctly said in this sentence "I have appeal equipment experience"? What is a better word I can use? PS: I really went with "broad experience" Thanks duskn
0
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0answers
35 views

Correct way to introduce yourself [duplicate]

In an interview, what is the correct way to introduce yourself? Some use "myself" and their name, and some use "I'm ___." I'm confused about what I use. Please guide me.
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0answers
37 views

Why can you 'ask somebody', but must 'enquire/query OF somebody'?

[ODO:] [1.] ask something of somebody [2.] ask somebody something [ODO:] [3.] enquire something of somebody = (formal) to ask somebody something Why does 'ask' NOT require a ...
0
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2answers
75 views

“error” vs. “mistake”

I think I understand the difference between “error” and “mistake”, but today I saw this article about Google’s self-driving cars that has the following sentence: A lot of this won’t be a surprise, ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

Interpretation of “need not”

What is the meaning of "need not" in the following sentence? The amount withdrawn need not be repaid. Does it always mean that it must not be repaid, or does it also extend to persons who may ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Shipping costs or shipment costs?

shipping costs or shipment costs? I want to know the correct form and the difference between them, if there is one. Thank you!
2
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2answers
35 views

“Aforementioned” vs. “In question”

As I know, the words "Aforementioned" and "In question" have a similar meaning and imply referring to something that has already been mentioned, but when I looked up at the internet i found out that ...
1
vote
3answers
66 views

difference between “estate” and “property”

What is the difference between "estate" and "property" in the context of this sentence (from Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility)? The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Difference between upcoming and forthcoming [closed]

What is the difference between upcoming vs forthcoming? For example, which one is the correct : Forthcoming Movies OR Upcoming Movies
1
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0answers
15 views

Difference between while and whilst [duplicate]

What is the difference between 'while' and 'whilst'? When to use them?
0
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2answers
40 views

What is the difference between autonomous and automatic

I would like to know the difference between autonomous sensor automatic sensor Thanks in advance.
4
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1answer
128 views

How did we get ‘deft’ and ‘daffy’ from “daft”?

[ Etymonline for 'daft (adj.)'] Old English gedæfte "gentle, becoming," ... from PIE * dhabh- "to fit together" (see fabric). Sense of "mild, well-mannered" (c. 1200). [ Etymonline for ...
-1
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2answers
48 views

Is there any difference? [closed]

Is there any fundamental difference in meaning here? I would understand perfectly if the woman had done something wrong and another woman were blaming her but this isn't the case. I would understand ...
1
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2answers
60 views

'Refer' vs 'make reference'

What is the difference between saying "He referred to something" and "He made reference to something"? Is it a question of mood? Emphasis? Agency? Different paths to English since the latter is a ...
1
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2answers
95 views

Energy vs. Power

Is there a rule in English regarding when to use the word "energy" and when to use "power"? For example: I don't have the energy to deal with the problem now. It takes a lot of brain power ...
1
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2answers
68 views

“Licensed” vs. “registered” [closed]

I found these terms while doing some research about insurance: Agents must usually be licensed in the province or territory in which they do business. Brokers must usually be registered in ...
1
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2answers
45 views

Tallest vs Loftiest [closed]

How is the usage of the two words different? I think they mean one and the same. Are they?
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
1
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3answers
87 views

What's the difference between e.g. “room 5” and “number 5”?

Is it correct to use the word ‘number’ meaning "hotel room'? Thanks in advance.
0
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1answer
62 views

What is the difference between a forefather and an ancestor?

Stumbled upon this question today while going through synonyms of various terms. I was advised that they are not synonymous to each other. Please advise.
0
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2answers
61 views

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct? [duplicate]

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct?. In some published papers, I either see 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' used in some sentences or phrases. Can someone justify and comment?
1
vote
1answer
107 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Difference between “doesn't seem to rain” & “doesn't seem to be raining” [closed]

What's the difference between 'It doesn't seem to rain.' and 'It doesn't seem to be raining.' ? Is it that the first means "the rain didn't occur often", and the second means "it doesn't rain in the ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Problems with the meanings of the words 'already' and 'yet'

I have a problem with understanding the difference between 'already' and 'yet'. Are these examples correct and do they mean the same? Have they already done it? Have they done it yet? ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Amass vs accumulate - is there a difference or can these be used interchangeably?

These two words mean pretty much the same thing. But I couldn't understand the difference. I picked these two examples from google translate: investigators have yet to accumulate enough ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning or usage between slightly and a bit? For example, the sentence: I thought she was younger than me, but in fact she proved to be even slightly older. Is ...
0
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1answer
55 views

The Difference Between “not unknown to” and “known to”?

An non-native English-speaking friend of mine came across the phrase "not unknown to" as in "tragedy is not unknown to the Kennedy family" and asked the question, "What's the difference between 'not ...
0
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2answers
65 views

a “piece” vs. an “item” of clothing

What is the difference between an item of clothing and a piece of clothing? Can I say "three pieces of clothing" or "three items of clothing"? Are they used identically?
0
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2answers
78 views

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed'?

What is the difference between 'finished' and 'completed', As both words gives the same meaning. Ex 1: He finished his homework. Ex 2: He completed his homework. And also how to use or ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What's the difference between “zero in” and “home in”?

According to Oxford dictionary, both seem to mean "focus on" or "aim at" zero in: Take aim with a gun or missile/Focus one’s attention. home in: Move or be aimed toward (a target or destination) with ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Difference between “on the level” and “at the level”

Specifically I'd like to know when you would say "at the behavioral level" and when "on the behavioral level." It feels like there is a difference, but I can't put my finger on it.
0
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2answers
78 views

Give some examples using “food, cuisine, dish, menu and ingredient” [closed]

I have troubles using some words about food and I cannot feel the subtle differences of their usage. I'd like to get some help with examples using these various words. Food Cuisine dishes menu meal ...
0
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2answers
76 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as "the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance" Why is it stated ...
1
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3answers
64 views

Hyperbolic vs Hyperbolical

I just looked up the word "hyperbolic" in the 3rd edition of "The New Oxford American Dictionary", and the second definition says "(of language) exaggerated; hyperbolical." When I go to hyperbolical, ...
0
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1answer
22 views

usage of dissimilar

This sentence is grammatically correct. But does it make sense to use word dissimilar to avoid repetition of different here? the results would be absolutely dissimilar if there is any slight ...
-2
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2answers
86 views

What is the difference between Assumption and Assertion? [closed]

How does assume differs from assert? Looking for a explanation with an example statement for both (it's better if the example statements are in the same context).
0
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0answers
28 views

What are the difference between knelt and kneeled?

kneeled (Dictionary.com): to go down or rest on the knees or a knee. knelt (Dictionary.com): a simple past tense and past participle of kneel.
6
votes
1answer
99 views

How did “Matron” and “Patron” come to mean different things?

Matron: (1) a married woman, especially one who is mature and staid or dignified and has an established social position; (2) a woman who has charge of the domestic affairs of a hospital, prison, or ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Exhortation v. Hortation - difference

Exhortation v. Hortation Are there any difference in (a) the usage and (b) the meaning of the two? It seems to me that Hortation is an obsolete word because in OED there is only a very brief ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Fight + preposition (with, over, about, against)

At first glance, I thought fight was an easy verb, then things started to get complicated: I fought with my brother for the bed. I fought with my brother over the bed. Here, for instance, over ...