Questions about English dictionaries

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2
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3answers
45 views

Hyphenating “process” in the meaning “series of actions” in AmE

Where to break the word "process" at the end of a line in the meaning "a series of actions" in US English? Dictionaries disagree on this (or I am misinterpreting what they say): Merriam-Webster ...
0
votes
4answers
83 views

How to chose the meaning of a word from many meanings [closed]

To increase my vocabulary, I collect words from my daily study and then find them in the Cambridge dictionary. But one word has many meanings. It is sometimes hard to memorize all of them, and it is ...
8
votes
7answers
4k views

Definition of “kissing cousins”— Are the dictionaries wrong/incomplete?

With relatives in the US south, I always thought that the definition of "kissing cousin" was a second cousin (or more distant) whom you could kiss and subsequently marry (FWIW I never did either!). ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

List of English word subjunctives

I'm working on a word cloud application and thought it would be useful to group different forms of the same word together. For example, "rides", "ride", "riding", and "rode" would all be grouped as ...
9
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2answers
1k views

American refusal of the IPA: why?

Are there any historical or political reasons for the rather consistent refusal of the International Phonetic Alphabet on the part of American academics? Did Mark Twain's ...
21
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5answers
10k views

Where can I obtain an English dictionary with structured data? [closed]

I would like to download an English dictionary -- not just a word list -- in a structured format such as TXT, XML, or SQL. Specifically, I need phonetic pronunciation and parts of speech (definition ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Help with “Rush the net”

It didn’t feel any more disjunctive than seeing Suzanne Lenglen rush the net in a full-length dress in say, 1916. Hey guys! I did not get meaning of "rush the net" exactly. Any idea? Thanks a ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Is it Possible to Learn Indo-Proto-European?

Is there a reputable and/or notable dictionary that lists all the words in Proto-Indo-European that can be translated to their literal equivalent in Modern English?
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Why are headwords in some dictionaries, such as Oxford's, hyphenated?

Why are headwords in some dictionaries, such as Oxford's, hyphenated? It doesn't seem to break words down into morphemes (hyp-no-tize only has two morphemes) or into syllables (eas-ily has three ...
9
votes
4answers
7k views

What is the best paper-based dictionary? [closed]

I'd like to have a dictionary in paper that won't be very big, at least there should be one tome, and it should be something like thefreedictionary.com but in paper, to use it offline. Please advise.
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Where can we find a list of English words classified by frequency of use? [closed]

I need at least the first 10 000 most commonly used words, but more would be better. It’s not a problem if the list is a little imprecise.
-6
votes
1answer
116 views

How many words are there in English if we don’t count duplicates? [closed]

How many words are there in English if: we don't count plurals: 'dogs' doesn't count; only 'dog' counts. we don't count different conjugations or different tenses: 'walks', 'walked' and 'walking' ...
2
votes
2answers
49 views

Is weary a common portmanteau of “wary” and “leary”? [closed]

In a comment on a different SE-page, someone misspelt (or intentionally used a different word?) wary, using weary instead: Someone else jokingly pointed this out, the original commenter then ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

Which English to use in Portugal: British or American? [closed]

I'm not sure this is the right place to ask this, but any help is appreciated. I'm Portuguese, but I also use English for my work. For that, I use dictionaries in my computer. My question is: which ...
10
votes
7answers
3k views

What does “akin to” mean in etymologies in dictionary entries?

Many etymologies in dictionaries say that some word is “akin to” a word in some other language. For example, here is part of the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary entry for salt: Main Entry: 1salt ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

What would “in modern colourless use” mean in a dictionary definition?

While looking up the various senses of "while" in the Oxford English Dictionary, I came across the following: [B 2 c.] In modern colourless use: At the same time that, besides that, in addition to ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Word for a book that describes translations

I am looking for a word that is used to describe a book that contains one-to-one translations of words from one language to another. For example, a chinese-english dictionary is one of these types of ...
9
votes
6answers
4k views

Is there such thing as an online preposition dictionary?

Is there such a thing as an online preposition dictionary? For example, I want to use the word "interpretation" but I am not sure of its preposition. I don't know if the correct preposition should ...
4
votes
2answers
126 views

Is there a kind of “official” dictionary for the English language?

Context On languages having an Academy (I know it's not the English case thanks to this SE site) it's usual that those academies edit and maintain a kind of official dictionary for that language. ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Do we have any English dictionary that shows precisely both letters and diacritics?

Dictionary uses IPA to depict the sound. However, most of them do not include diacritics, and thus it is very hard for learner to distinguish the sound. See this quote from Wiki IPA symbols are ...
1
vote
2answers
522 views

Proper term for “surity..??” [closed]

What's the proper word for "surity or sure-ness". E.g. "It's a surity that it will happen". I know "assurance" can be used. But is there an even closer term for this..?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Dictionary which shows plural form?

I am looking for a dictionary (program / app) that tells me about the plural form of a word. I have tried Dictionary.com, Meriam-Webster and OED but they are not. I know if I look for media, it ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Do dictionaries use polysemes in definitions without sufficiently explaining which sense/s is/are involved?

I want to know if the definitions grouped in a dictionary are stated in unequivocal language. e.g. Wax has the following definition: [literary] become larger or stronger. his anger waxed – Is ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Does OED (and other major dictionaries) use the label “Slang” or only “Informal”?

I was just looking at some slang words in dictionaries. Surprisingly they are all (that I could find) labelled "informal". I couldn't find any labelled "slang". Same deal in other major ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is there a dictionary with phonemic transcription for different dialects? [duplicate]

Sometimes I am not sure how a Northerner says "Winter is coming". I searched on the Internet but nothing showed up. I wonder if you know there is a dictionary (online or offline) that simply contains ...
2
votes
5answers
349 views

Where did the phrase 'Uh Oh' come from?

Uh oh is defined as something you say when you made a mistake, or when something is going wrong or a bad thing is about to happen. An example of a time when you would say "uh oh" is when you ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

About how many words of four letters are there in English?

I was trying to determine about how many words there are in English, with four letters. (Ideally, excluding "s" plural, so cats and dogs would not be included.) Does anyone have any concrete ...
3
votes
0answers
116 views

How do emojis sort in a dictionary? [closed]

Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2015 is… 😂 AKA the 'Face with Tears of Joy' emoji. Where will they file this in their dictionary? Have the people at Oxford made a large mistake, or ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Which was the first dictionary and how was it decided which words went into it?

I've heard the riddle: "If Websters' was the first dictionary where did he get all the words from?" It has quite since intrigued me, honestly. Which was the first English language dictionary and how ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Difference between Collocational Dictionary and Idiomatic Dictionary and Expressions Dictionary

I am happen to be a hard seeker of different expressions and/or word combinations meanings. so I came across collocation dictionary and idiomatic and expressions dictionaries. is there a difference ...
12
votes
3answers
923 views

Is 'compatriate' really an English word?

I recently saw the word 'compatriate' used in a newspaper article. Upon looking it up, suspecting a typo (or even an eggcorn: it is easy to see how compatriot would be mixed-up with expatriate etc.), ...
0
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2answers
118 views

What is this word in 19th century dictionary? [closed]

I was reading a passage from P. Austin Nuttall's 1869 book, Dictionary of Scientific Terms, and from what it looks like, in both the PDF and Page images views, the word seems to be pseudostella. ...
2
votes
2answers
130 views

Usage of the word 'Cachet' [closed]

When I was about 10-15 years younger, I lived near a club named Cache. It was pronouced like 'sachet'. I assumed at this time that this was the spelling of what is defined as 'Cachet'. Also, I ...
1
vote
3answers
420 views

What does the semicolon in the dictionary definition of a word mean?

Many dictionaries use a semicolon in a meaning for a word. For instance for the word impertinent I have seen: "outside the bounds of proper speech or behaviour; impudent; insolent; saucy" Then ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Is “prayerlike” a word? [closed]

It's included the Merriam-Webster dictionary. I'm just curious if it is acknowledged as a proper form of "prayer."
3
votes
4answers
404 views

On the duplicity of “peruse” [duplicate]

The following are the two main definitions of the verb peruse that the editors at Merriam-Webster.com have put forward: : to look at or read (something) in an informal or relaxed way : to ...
2
votes
2answers
207 views

Is there any grammar rule for the usage of the re- prefix?

I've read carefully this question posted 4 years ago: Adding "re" prefix You can't use the prefix re- in any verb. Rebe, rebelieve, rehave, etc. However there are plenty of verbs that use ...
1
vote
2answers
168 views

Resources for native Anglo-Saxon vocabulary building. [closed]

Are there any dictionaries or thesaurus' out there that specialize in native English vocabulary, that is to say, real English words that are not of foreign (Latin, French, or Greek) origin? It's ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Best resources for word popularity [closed]

I am looking for a good resource that can give me some idea of how popular or commonly used a word is. Some of these may be: WordCount.org -- Indexes the words based on the popularity count. For ...
4
votes
3answers
141 views

Does there exist a subset of words which can be used to define all others?

All words in the dictionary are defined by using other words. Has there been any research that has traced these definitions down to a subset of the English language which can define the rest of it? ...
0
votes
1answer
127 views

What is the best dictionary for learning a contemporary American accent? [closed]

I’m using the Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary (18th edition, 2011). I know how IPA phonemes work and can also fathom American notations. So, which dictionary would best help a rookie to learn ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Antonym of 'helper'?

This is my question. If 'helper' means 'someone who helps', then what is 'someone who got helped'? Whom does the helper help? Is there any term to define it? Thanks!
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Where can I get a collection of “word spectrums”?

I understand that the The Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus includes "word spectrums" (see illustration below) for a number of words. Is there another source for such type of data? That is, I want ...
30
votes
4answers
7k views

How and when did American spelling supersede British spelling in the US?

Considering that Webster published his first dictionary in 1806, is there a recognised tipping point (year, decade, etc.) that marked the move from traditional British spelling to Webster's American? ...
2
votes
3answers
627 views

Dictionary form - oneself vs. yourself

My colleagues and I are working on something and we have to frequently reference English dictionaries. We use all of them, Merriam-Webster, Oxford, Cambridge, Longman, the works. Anyway, we came ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

In Apple's Dictionary app, what is the name of these characters?

I have been using Apple's dictionary app on my Mac, could someone tell me what the formal name of the characters are next to word 'Causation' in the screenshot and what is their purpose? ...
0
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0answers
50 views

Dictionary grouped by English levels and word's popularity

I am looking for dictionary where words would be grouped by English levels (Beginner, Elementary, Intermediate...) and popularity of them, or event just list of words grouped by levels. Thanks in ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Proper usage of “engendered”

"His actions engendered a revolution in the Capitol." This sounds a bit off to me. But going by the dictionary meaning, this is legal and correct. Is this correct in terms of readability and ...
12
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5answers
10k views

Is “criterions” a valid plural for “criterion”?

Is criterions a valid plural for criterion? Dictionary.com says it is, but Oxford does not confirm or reject it.
3
votes
2answers
441 views

Historical Basis for “To Graduate” Being Only a Transitive Verb

About nine years ago, I received from a quite insistent source the claim that the verb "to graduate" is transitive, and, specifically, that the intransitive usage was wrong. For example, the ...