Questions about English dictionaries

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3
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9answers
1k views

What word describes interpreting evidence in such a way as to reach a desired conclusion?

Does anyone know what it's called when you interpret evidence to reach the conclusion you want?
3
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4answers
380 views

On the duplicity of “peruse” [duplicate]

The following are the two main definitions of the verb peruse that the editors at Merriam-Webster.com have put forward: : to look at or read (something) in an informal or relaxed way : to ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Is there an 'official' way to suggest a new word become part of the English language? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Regulatory bodies and authoritative dictionaries for English Creating a new word What are the criteria to adopt new words into English? I've always been told, at ...
3
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4answers
9k views

'Upgradation' not universally accepted?

While copy-editing an article for a journal, I came across the word 'upgradation' underlined red by MS Word (It's underlined red even as I type it in Chrome). The publishers of the journal recommend ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Order of definitions in dictionaries

Are dictionary definitions for words with multiple meanings ordered based on chronology, hierarchy, or frequency of usage? Is/was there a standard format?
3
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1answer
128 views

What's the earliest reference to a non-article word that still exists today?

Assuming around 1800 is "par" for "earliest mention" of an English word by most of our esteemed GR (GR: General Reference) text, is this for any particular reason strongly cut off at that time? I'm ...
3
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2answers
396 views

Historical Basis for “To Graduate” Being Only a Transitive Verb

About nine years ago, I received from a quite insistent source the claim that the verb "to graduate" is transitive, and, specifically, that the intransitive usage was wrong. For example, the ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Is esquivalience now a bona fide word?

Today, I came across WP's entry for the word esquivalience: "Esquivalience" is a fictitious entry in the New Oxford American Dictionary (NOAD), which was designed and included to protect copyright ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Which was the first dictionary and how was it decided which words went into it?

I've heard the riddle: "If Websters' was the first dictionary where did he get all the words from?" It has quite since intrigued me, honestly. Which was the first English language dictionary and how ...
3
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3answers
781 views

Is it possible to form adjective “morally” by deriving it from the noun “moral” (as in “of the story”)?

Recently I used the word morally as an adjective formed from the noun moral. The concept I wanted to describe was that some statement is morally correct if you are able to agree with it intuitively ...
3
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1answer
219 views

When did “Twerking” and “Selfie” enter the dictionary?

I read in the news that twerking and selfie have been added to dictionary recently. Did it give any origin? Is there any information or details about them?
3
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4answers
765 views

What is a “sounds like” thesaurus called?

A dictionary contains word definitions. A thesaurus contains words that mean the same (synonyms). I'm looking for a name for a word dictionary that will give you rhymes (or "sounds like") of a word. ...
3
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1answer
814 views

What is the accepted definition of the following words in this sentence?

Quoting DailyWTF: The Matrix! No, not the the uburbulous deprodication errebelously conceived by “The Architect”. What is the accepted definition of the following words in the preceding quote? ...
3
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5answers
1k views

Is there a specific word for a list of [word + how to use it in a sentence]?

Like a dictionary, but instead of a list of words and their definitions, it contains words and how to use them in a sentence. If there is no such word, is there a specific word for a dictionary that ...
3
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2answers
98 views

Do we have any English dictionary that shows precisely both letters and diacritics?

Dictionary uses IPA to depict the sound. However, most of them do not include diacritics, and thus it is very hard for learner to distinguish the sound. See this quote from Wiki IPA symbols are ...
3
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1answer
94 views

Ogooglebar , ungoogleable or agoogleable?

If something cant be found after searching on google. Ogooglebar or some other term? Predictions? Is there already an accepted term?
3
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3answers
717 views

Good dictionary software

What is good dictionary software? I am asking about the ones that can be downloaded and used on Windows machines, and not online websites. I thought Word Web is a good one, but are there any advanced ...
3
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2answers
82 views

Do dictionaries use polysemes in definitions without sufficiently explaining which sense/s is/are involved?

I want to know if the definitions grouped in a dictionary are stated in unequivocal language. e.g. Wax has the following definition: [literary] become larger or stronger. his anger waxed – Is ...
3
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1answer
152 views

How do dictionaries cope with new meanings of words? [closed]

Scientists are working on every aspect of our lives and find out different information which is sometimes contradictory to the previous information or definitions. Or sometimes there are some ...
3
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3answers
4k views

Descent, Ancestry, Lineage

Please help me with the words 'descent', 'ancestry', and 'lineage'. Dictionaries show that they are loosely the same: 1a. He has German descent. 1b. He is of German descent. 2a. He has ...
3
votes
1answer
437 views

Do any print dictionaries admit “everytime” as a word?

I've noticed a tendency for more and more two-word phrases with even slightly idiomatic usage being written more and more as single word compounds. Today when I came across "everytime" written as a ...
3
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0answers
43 views

Is there a kind of “official” dictionary for the English language?

Context On languages having an Academy (I know it's not the English case thanks to this SE site) it's usual that those academies edit and maintain a kind of official dictionary for that language. ...
3
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0answers
109 views

How do emojis sort in a dictionary? [closed]

Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2015 is… 😂 AKA the 'Face with Tears of Joy' emoji. Where will they file this in their dictionary? Have the people at Oxford made a large mistake, or ...
3
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0answers
138 views

What dictionary should be used when citing the dictionary in an American PhD-level dissertation? [closed]

In an Australian PhD dissertation, the Oxford English Dictionary would be the obvious choice when needing to make reference to a dictionary definition. However, I am writing for an audience of ...
3
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0answers
135 views

I am in search of a good dictionary (meanings/definitions) with American IPA pronunciation… Any suggestions? [closed]

I am in search of a good dictionary (meanings, definitions, etymology) with American IPA pronunciation. Any suggestions? Thank You!
3
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0answers
522 views

Why do you think the Oxford English Dictionary modified their definition of “of?” [closed]

Of 'of': Expressing Possession and Being Possessed I would like to discuss changes made to the definition of 'of' in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) from the 1989 edition to the 2010 edition. ...
2
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2answers
113 views

Usage of the word 'Cachet' [closed]

When I was about 10-15 years younger, I lived near a club named Cache. It was pronouced like 'sachet'. I assumed at this time that this was the spelling of what is defined as 'Cachet'. Also, I ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Is 'biasedness' a real word?

I am curious about the usage of word biasedness, I am unable to find it in Oxford's advance learners dictionary but on the internet. When tried to consult some expert, he said that it's a colloquial ...
2
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5answers
1k views

Vast amount of vocabulary in English books [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there 20,000 English words in the average adult's vocabulary? English is not my native language, but I use it on a daily basis. I started reading English ...
2
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2answers
150 views

Is there any grammar rule for the usage of the re- prefix?

I've read carefully this question posted 4 years ago: Adding "re" prefix You can't use the prefix re- in any verb. Rebe, rebelieve, rehave, etc. However there are plenty of verbs that use ...
2
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1answer
330 views

The lost English dictionary

There is an old dictionary of the English language where words are defined from a pessimistic/skeptical/sadistic perspective. I seem to have lost the link to that dictionary in my bookmarks. I wonder ...
2
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5answers
209 views

Where did the phrase 'Uh Oh' come from?

Uh oh is defined as something you say when you made a mistake, or when something is going wrong or a bad thing is about to happen. An example of a time when you would say "uh oh" is when you ...
2
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1answer
7k views

English dictionary for download [duplicate]

I'm looking for dictionaries for download. I have found word lists from some Scrabble game sites, etc. but these lists are incomplete and do not cover word definitions and, perhaps, a thesaurus. I ...
2
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1answer
506 views

What is student discussion place called? [closed]

Is there any English (or in other languages) word for a place where students of different colleges discuss about activities (events, reputation) of their colleges/universities
2
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1answer
62 views

Lose Attendence Numbers

When some sport is "losing attendance numbers", what does "numbers" refer to? I can't find a good definition in dictionaries that would fit this usage.
2
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1answer
1k views

The word “cooker”

According to Merriam-Webster, one of the definitions of the word "cooker" is "a person who tends a cooking process (a cook)." The dictionary provides the following example sentence: Dad was the ...
2
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3answers
352 views

Dictionary form - oneself vs. yourself

My colleagues and I are working on something and we have to frequently reference English dictionaries. We use all of them, Merriam-Webster, Oxford, Cambridge, Longman, the works. Anyway, we came ...
2
votes
1answer
117 views

Is there any statistical data about English languange? [closed]

Not sure if this is on topic, feel free to migrate it, close it or delete it, it's the first time here, i found the programming tag so I give it a shot. Is it possible to download some sort of a ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Dictionary of English word syllables and stresses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Where can I obtain an English dictionary with structured data? Does anybody know of a downloadable dictionary of English words with their syllables AND stress patterns? ...
2
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4answers
533 views

Suggestion for English phrase dictionary?

I am not native English guy. One of the problem when I learn English is that I don't understand phrases, the phrase used cannot be found in the dictionary, which only contains single word. ...
2
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0answers
50 views

Does an analytic dictionary of English exist? [closed]

I read about this type of definition in a linguistics glossary. Analytic definition: a description of the range of reference of a lexical unit. This description is made up of ageneric term ...
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4answers
2k views

What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
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3answers
1k views

Creating a new word [duplicate]

If you invent a new word, how do you go about getting this recognised as a real word in dictionaries?
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2answers
142 views

Old Greek vs ancient Greek [closed]

I learned the language of Plato and Sokrates at school - is it 'old Greek' or 'ancient Greek'?
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7answers
2k views

When you say a man is a coward, does it imply femininity by default? Is ''girlish coward'' a common expression?

I was wondering about this and would appreciate your take on the question.
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3answers
521 views

When could you take the “Urban Dictionary” seriously? [closed]

I have always had a serious problem with Urban Dictionary as I do not know when to take it seriously and when not! Sometimes it seems very useful to me to understand what ordinary people on the ...
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3answers
249 views

Uniformalize vs uniformize

In my standard college dictionary "uniformalize" is listed as rare, while "uniformize" is not listed at all, yet wikipedia is the opposite.
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2answers
1k views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...
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2answers
86 views

Proper term for “surity..??” [closed]

What's the proper word for "surity or sure-ness". E.g. "It's a surity that it will happen". I know "assurance" can be used. But is there an even closer term for this..?
1
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2answers
140 views

Resources for native Anglo-Saxon vocabulary building. [closed]

Are there any dictionaries or thesaurus' out there that specialize in native English vocabulary, that is to say, real English words that are not of foreign (Latin, French, or Greek) origin? It's ...