1
vote
1answer
63 views

'Upgradation' not universally accepted?

While copy-editing an article for a journal, I came across the word 'upgradation' underlined red by MS Word (It's underlined red even as I type it in Chrome). The publishers of the journal recommend ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Does an analytic dictionary of English exist? [closed]

I read about this type of definition in a linguistics glossary. Analytic definition: a description of the range of reference of a lexical unit. This description is made up of ageneric term ...
1
vote
3answers
81 views

Is the definition of browser generally poor? [closed]

In regards to this question on meta Stackoverflow I had a look at what definitions one find for "browser". My definition of to browse is in short looking for information or things of interest. In ...
1
vote
7answers
628 views

When you say a man is a coward, does it imply femininity by default? Is ''girlish coward'' a common expression?

I was wondering about this and would appreciate your take on the question.
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Lose Attendence Numbers

When some sport is "losing attendance numbers", what does "numbers" refer to? I can't find a good definition in dictionaries that would fit this usage.
-1
votes
1answer
136 views

Are there any dictionaries that meet the criteria below? [closed]

Suppose I wanted to write a computer program that replaces a word with its definition. Some dictionaries, such as the Google dictionary, would not work for this task; for example, if one tries to ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

When did “Twerking” and “Selfie” enter the dictionary?

I read in the news that twerking and selfie have been added to dictionary recently. Did it give any origin? Is there any information or details about them?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Descent, Ancestry, Lineage

Please help me with the words 'descent', 'ancestry', and 'lineage'. Dictionaries show that they are loosely the same: 1a. He has German descent. 1b. He is of German descent. 2a. He has ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
5
votes
1answer
6k views

Is it all right to use “in hopes of” to mean “with the aim of”?

Recently I browsed through the definition of hope in New Oxford American Dictionary (provided by Apple in the dictionary app) to double confirm with its usage as I answered a word-choice question and ...
6
votes
2answers
22k views

Why are “scaring” and “scarring” confused by some dictionaries? [closed]

Scaring is related to the word scare, while scarring is related to the word scar. Why is it that some dictionaries get these two words confused? For example, when you use Mac OS X Lion's lookup ...
2
votes
5answers
991 views

Vast amount of vocabulary in English books [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there 20,000 English words in the average adult's vocabulary? English is not my native language, but I use it on a daily basis. I started reading English ...
1
vote
2answers
778 views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...
7
votes
2answers
252 views

Percentages of meanings in an English dictionary

Often when you look for some new word in a dictionary, you will find many definitions or meanings of the one word. For example when you look for a word to in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary you ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Which of these meanings for the word “pet” came first?

The word "pet" has a few different definitions (my own paraphrase): n: An animal kept for companionship. v: To affectionately caress. My question is, which of these usages originated first? Do we ...
3
votes
1answer
567 views

What is the accepted definition of the following words in this sentence?

Quoting DailyWTF: The Matrix! No, not the the uburbulous deprodication errebelously conceived by “The Architect”. What is the accepted definition of the following words in the above quote? ...
3
votes
3answers
455 views

Is it possible to form adjective “morally” by deriving it from the noun “moral” (as in “of the story”)?

Recently I used the word morally as an adjective formed from the noun moral. The concept I wanted to describe was that some statement is morally correct if you are able to agree with it intuitively ...
8
votes
7answers
2k views

What does “akin to” mean in etymologies in dictionary entries?

Many etymologies in dictionaries say that some word is “akin to” a word in some other language. For example, here is part of the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary entry for salt: Main Entry: 1salt ...