Tagged Questions

This tag is for questions related to mutually intelligible variations within a language.

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0
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0answers
25 views

Regional pronunciation of “houndstooth” as “houndsooth”

I have always pronounced "houndstooth" as ˈhau̇n(d)z-ˌtüth , the exact same way I would pronounce the phrase "hound's tooth". Recently, I was told that the pronunciation should be "hound sooth", ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape”

He teaches Potions, but he doesn't want to—everyone knows he's after Quirrell's job. Knows an awful lot about the Dark Arts, Snape. From time to time I stumble upon this type of speech with ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

“P-U-L-L” vs. “P-U-double L”

I have heard some people spell double letters individually, e.g. "B-B", "C-C", or "D-D". But I have also heard others use the word double instead. Is there any dialectical preference? Is there any ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

Where in the U.S. do people change the stress of umbrella, adult and TV to the first syllable?

Is it just a small percentage of the population in that region who stress the first syllable, or is it widespread? In other words, if I visit such region will I find almost everyone talking like that ...
4
votes
1answer
76 views

“Those box” - part of a studied dialect or merely an idiolect?

My wife, who is from northern New Jersey, USA, and who has a cold, was looking for a box of Kleenex/facial tissues this morning; she said to herself, "I need those box of tissues." This was not simply ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

What do 'en.' and 'more'n' mean in this passage?

The passage, from The Invisible Man by H.G.Wells, is following: "'Tas sperits," said Mrs. Hall. "I know 'tas sperits. I've read in papers of en. Tables and chairs leaping and dancing..." "Take a drop ...
2
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1answer
66 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
1
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1answer
34 views

Source of Maine's “Ayuh”?

What's the etymology of this Maine synonym for "yes"? I've always wondered. OTOH, "finest kind" is pretty obvious.
2
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1answer
60 views

When did Lancastrians stop saying *by gum*?

I distinctly remember from my youth in the 1950s, the folk of Manchester and surrounds who came on holiday to Norfolk, and their expressions of bye jove and by gum - polite forms of by God. But in ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Phoneme glottalization in English dialects other than /t/?

I've done a bit of reading on t-glottalization, so I'm familiar with how it is used and its prevalence in English dialects. Are other phonemes or sounds similarly commonplace or widely used in ...
4
votes
1answer
156 views

Grocery Store Aisle

When speaking the phrase grocery store aisle, I leave the s in aisle silent. Are there any regional variations of English in which the s is not silent?
2
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3answers
78 views

“Can I help you, love?” Love as a form of address: is it used regionally to talk to strangers?

I've been reading a chapter about the vocabulary of the Yorkshire dialect in the UK. Among other interesting curiosities ("child" plural "childer", "lad and lass" for "son an daughter") I've come ...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

Are there any mutually unintelligible English dialects?

Are there any mutually unintelligible English dialects? So far I've only been able to learn is that English is highly intelligible among its different dialects, but no actual statement that all ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

What was Princeton 6 in Jamaican English?

I got an Old Raggae album and started listening to "Bam Bam" by Sister Nancy (youtube) After listening several times, I could start making out the English words (lyrics): A me seh one thing Nancy ...
2
votes
2answers
113 views

Is the acronym “PET” only used in some countries?

A sign above a recycling bin, written in Korean, saying "PET・캔" (the last character seems to be the Korean word for "Can") was not recognised by some people in this blog post as referring to the ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Is it proper to refer to a clothes dryer as a drying machine?

A clothes washing machine is commonly referred to as either a "washer" or a "washing machine" but I have only ever heard of a clothes dryer being referred to as a "dryer". Is it a regional thing? Is ...
7
votes
2answers
167 views

Is it mere slang to use the verb 'stick' in place of 'versus', as in 'Us three 'stick' you four'?

When I was a child (well over a half-century ago) in Norfolk, we would, when playing football talk of 'Team A stick Team B. When arranging sides informally we would say 'Us three stick the rest of ...
6
votes
2answers
249 views

Where do people pronounce “ank” as /eŋk/ vs. /æŋk/?

Let's use "bank" as an example. Some Americans pronounce it /bæŋk/, using the vowel of TRAP. Others pronounce it /beŋk/, using the vowel of FACE. Where are these two pronunciations found?
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Nonstandard spellings for dialects

Are there standard ways of indicating dialect, as "I 'aven't," I asked 'is name," and especially "It couldn't 'a' 'appened." Can "have" be indicated with just "a"?
2
votes
2answers
152 views

In what dialects is “I don't like it too” grammatical?

Consider: Too — (adv.) also, as well, in addition. We don’t usually use too in negative clauses; we use either instead: I don’t like that kind of stuff. I don’t like it either. That said, ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Is the construction “maker of all universe” grammatical in any English dialect?

The song "Great Are You Lord" by the worship musician Sinach includes the following lines: Holy, Holy God Almighty It’s a privilege to worship you Maker of all universe It’s an honour just ...
2
votes
4answers
409 views

How many syllables does “Science” have?

The pronunciation of the word science seems to vary based on which part of the world you're in. I have heard it pronounced "sai-ens" and "saains" (think "signs"). I have check the dictionary, but ...
3
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0answers
83 views

If I believe that AAVE is a legitimate dialect of English, am I a linguistic prescriptivist or a descriptivist? [closed]

Or maybe there is a third categorization I should use, such as "linguistic inclusivist"? I believe that hypercorrections like "This is a secret between you and I" and "Whom is he?" are incorrect ...
0
votes
2answers
139 views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
4
votes
4answers
804 views

Good thinking, that man!

I've come across this one in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. One character often used shouted "Good thinking, that man!" as a praise. Is this a real English regionalism?
5
votes
1answer
221 views

Do gentiles use “appetizing” as a noun?

Growing up in Nebraska, I only knew the word "appetizing" as a adjective. Not until I converted to Judaism and married a nice Jewish girl from Flushing, Queens, did I learn that "appetizing" is a ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

Were American, Australian, and New Zealand English dialects ever spoken in Britain before the colonization of these lands? [closed]

Were American, Australian, and New Zealand English dialects ever spoken in Britain before the colonization of these lands?
2
votes
1answer
159 views

Delayed subject with short subject length

I read a few pages (here for example) dealing with "anticipatory/dummy it" and "delayed subject" to try and satisfy my curiosity about an observation I'd made about a friend's speech. Often, when my ...
-1
votes
2answers
89 views

Using conjunction “while” as an archaic prepositonal form for “until”

In my Penguin English Dictionary, I've encountered the word while marked as an archaic form for the preposition until. Furthermore, according to my online research, Oxford Dictionary states that it is ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

How does 'Bull I' Th' Thorn Inn' translate into standard English?

I am currently staying briefly in Stockport. Among the vast array of historical education that the town offers, is a most refreshing feature, given the current heat wave in North-west England. That is ...
6
votes
2answers
285 views

What Defines a Utah Accent?

I have heard a number of people refer to the "Utah accent." What is it that distinguishes a Utah accent from others? I have noticed that, in some cases, people from Utah omit the 't' from words such ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

English approximations of Spanish pronouns

Excuse me if this question sounds familiar, but I've searched and couldn't find what I desired. In the Spanish second-person, there is usted (formal), tú (familiar), and ustedes (plural for both). ...
1
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2answers
165 views

Origin of New Jersey idiom “down the shore”

As a native Midwesterner, I was very puzzled to hear my wife (who is from northern New Jersey) use that idiom. I understand what it means, and as far as I can remember I understood what it meant from ...
2
votes
2answers
236 views

Why is there “Black English” but not “White English”?

African American Vernacular English is shortened to a less precise phrase "Black English". Also, Black English is used in a broader sense: Black English is a term used for both dialects of English ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

“emmet-butt” - Westcountry dialect

My grandfather's family were from Somerset in the southwest of England and one of his favourite pieces of Westcountry dialect was 'emmet-butt', which apparently meant/means a 'mole hill'. However, I ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Pronunciation of “accepted”

I just realized that I pronounce 'accepted' more commonly as " uh-sep-ted" than "ak-sep-ted". I'm nowhere near home (Maryland, USA) so I can't listen to see if it is a regional thing. Anyone familiar ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

What expressions/words are still used in Indian English that are no longer in British English? [duplicate]

I was traveling through India recently and noticed that many expressions that people used that I saw were somewhat older expressions, now disused in Standard English. Examples of these were: ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Saying “gate 'ooks” instead of “gateaux”

My father-in-law will say "gate 'ooks" instead of "gateaux". He claims this is a regional/dialectal thing and that it was common in the part of Sussex where he grew up. Is that likely, or is it more ...
8
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2answers
531 views

why do some people call green peppers mangoes?

I have heard people from Lima, Ohio refer to green peppers as mangoes. How did that come about?
1
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1answer
68 views

“What” pronounced as “wurt”

Is there any particular American dialect that does this? I have heard this kind of pronunciation on some American TV shows, mostly featuring teenage/college kids, and it appears more prevalent among ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

“I forgot” or “I forget” [duplicate]

I am from Philadelphia and I grew up saying, I forget when trying to recall something unsuccessfully. When I came in contact with people from other states, mostly in the mid-Atlantic region, I heard ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Translating from American to Canadian, when these are used as verbs, is it “log in” and “log out” or “login” and “logout”?

This is not a duplicate of questions such as“Login” or “log in”? or “log in to” or “log into” or “login to”. The reason is that this question deals specifically with converting from American English ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

'enact' vs 'reenact'

We [re]enacted Hamlet on the stage. In the context of performance, I've only ever heard 'reenact' used. However, dictionary.com lists the above example with 'enact'. Are they both correct? Is it ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How common is pronouncing the past tense of beat as /bet/?

Personally, I pronounce the past tense of "beat" (to win at a game) as /biːt/, to sound identical to the infinitive. However, I have heard a few people under the age of 30 and from either the west or ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Is the term 'put on his parts' used everywhere, or only in some dialects?

In Norfolk, when a child misbehaves in a demanding, or sulking way, they are often said to 'put on their parts'. 'She is putting on her parts again', means that she is following a pattern, typical ...
7
votes
3answers
501 views

Why do midwesterners say “the cancer”?

I was watching the TV show Fargo, which takes place in rural Minnesota. Most of the locals on the show speak with a recognizable midwestern accent, and there are some regionalisms that are common. The ...
3
votes
3answers
675 views

What is the origin of “I calls ’em like I sees ’em”?

This expression seems to be pretty widespread, for example being in Wiktionary and Futurama. Does anyone know what the origin is? Also, what kind of dialect might I calls or I sees be?
11
votes
11answers
3k views

“School Students” — what, like there's any other kind of student?

I think this might be a Pennsylvania thing: every so often, you'll see a van or small bus labeled, not "School Bus" or anything sane normal like that, but "School Students". Whenever I see a van ...
3
votes
1answer
177 views

How would you say (write) “Where are you going?” in a Yorkshire dialect?

I think that this might be close to: Wɪər ðæ gɔːwɪn? This would roughly be Wi-er tha gaw-in? In this example, the first word would be the two words where and are put together Wɪər, but somewhere in my ...
1
vote
1answer
383 views

What are some colloquial English expressions for comparing hot/cold weather to something else? [closed]

I'm looking for colloquial expressions that compare hot, cold, and wet weather to something else. For example, “It’s hotter than two goats in a pepper patch”, “Colder than a witch’s tit”, etc. Often ...