Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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31 views

'The average person' or 'an average person'?

Which one is correct, or are both of them fine? "It would take the average person 10 days to read this novel" Or "It would take an average person 10 days to read this novel"
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0answers
20 views

Question on use of either/either the and both/both the

As a second-language learner of English, I have been encountering many English expressions that I cannot grasp intuitively, but could find the most sound answers to some of my questions. However, I ...
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1answer
94 views

“driving across the state” or “driving across state”?

Is it "driving across state" like "driving across town", or "driving across THE state", like "driving across the country"?
0
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1answer
62 views

Non-use of Determiners

I have reviewed several related posts here but am still quite confused with the use of determiners. Say, in this sentence - "They reviewed the forms again to ensure completeness and accuracy." What ...
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0answers
17 views

Pronunciation of a (article) /ə/ vs /eɪ/ [duplicate]

When to use the weak form /ə/ and when to use the weak form /eɪ/ of the article "a"? I figure if I would emphasize anything I wouldn't emphasize an article like "a", but rather, the noun (phrase) ...
3
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2answers
82 views

In town but not in the town

We say "the best restaurant in town" but not "what is the best restaurant in the town". Why is this?
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4answers
99 views

There is not evidence vs. There is not any evidence vs. There is no evidence vs. There isn't evidence

A Washington Post article titled "Justice Dept. concludes that no, Michael Brown’s hands probably were not up" has this: According to the report, here is what investigators believe most likely ...
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7answers
9k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
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3answers
315 views

When to use “this” or “that”?

It is 10 cm on the map. That is 100 km in real terms. I am proofreading and it seems odd that the writer always uses that in these cases. I would have said this. Who is right and who is ...
2
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1answer
219 views

Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...
0
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2answers
50 views

“A”/“an” in front of a noun

Which sentence is grammatically correct or preferred? Emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. An emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. My kids and even one of their teachers ...
16
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7answers
3k views

Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?
0
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2answers
248 views

“To this end” or “To that end”

Is there a usage note for choosing between these two phrases? Nothing in Garner. And I've seen it both ways. Example: To that end, we propose the following compromise. or To this end, we ...
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8answers
20k views

Equivalent of “both” when referring to three or more items?

What would be the correct word to use when referring to three or more items, in the same manner as the word both? For example, using two words, with the word both: "There are several ...
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4answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

indefinite article plus proper name in organizational (i.e. business or bureaucracy) contexts

The use of the indefinite article with a proper name occurs often in business or organizational speech-contexts: We're lucky to have a Bill Jones to get the job done. The article plus proper ...
2
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1answer
257 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
4
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2answers
4k views

“At the time” versus “at that time”

If I want to say that during the accident there were no passengers, how do I phrase it? There were no passengers at the time. There were no passengers at that time.
0
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1answer
177 views

US English - need for determiners (a/an) in each item of a list (already parallel)

I have been all over every grammar site I can find (including this one) and cannot find a definitive answer. I am looking for a rule that says in a list of singular nouns, each noun must have its own ...
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6answers
581 views

A battery of tests is/are

This is from a recent article: He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery of tests was conducted. Now shouldn't it be He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery ...
0
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1answer
167 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
1
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1answer
97 views

adjectives and past participles used as nouns [duplicate]

In general, 'the + adjective' and 'the + past participle' could be used instead of a plural noun phrase. The good die young. The damned will bury the dead. I think in certain cases that ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

Repeating determiners: “the X and (the) Y”

I have a problem with the use of "the" after "and" where you would basically be connecting words. For example, which of the following is better: The table and the chairs? The table and chairs? ...
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2answers
75 views

Quantifiers “most” vs. “most of”

I came across this exercise in one of Oxford books. Most / Most of flowers bought at airports are safe, about 90%. Shouldn't we use "most of the" when we are talking about a specific set of ...
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4answers
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“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
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1answer
71 views

Coordination of nouns with determiners

These sentences are from some data set used for evaluating programs that automatically process languages, but I am doubtful about their grammaticality. (1) A man and woman are talking (2) The boy and ...
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4answers
154 views

Is “software” plural or singular? [closed]

I'd like to know why this sentence uses "needs" instead of "need": Even some very popular software sometimes needs a year or two of testing, I think the subject is plural because it says some is ...
2
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2answers
81 views

Dropping articles in confirmation messages

When writing a confirmation message, (i.e. from a computer system) is it correct to say: "Item was modified" or is it necessary to include the determinate article: "The item was modified".
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5answers
1k views

Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
35
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7answers
12k views

Are there any simple rules for choosing the definite vs. indefinite (vs. none) article?

I can’t for the life of me figure out where to use a and where to use the — and where there is no article at all. Is there a simple rule of thumb to memorize? The standard rule you always hear: ...
0
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2answers
86 views

known as (a, the) - which article to pick?

A quote from the Economist: Part of this naturalistic approach is that the transistors in his systems often operate in what is known technically as the “sub-threshold domain”. May we use a ...
6
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2answers
5k views

Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?

From what I have understood from reading about she/her, I understand that 'she' is to be used as a subject (with the 'be' implied) and 'her' as an object, but I am confused about the usage with ...
2
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3answers
344 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
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1answer
307 views

How to identify a determiner in a sentence that uses 2 determiners

In the sentence, "This is a flower." How can we both say that the "a" refers to a general noun (flower), yet also account for the presence of the specific determiner, "this?"
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3answers
286 views

“So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?

The sentence rings false in my head. Clearly this is because "weapons" is a countable noun, and "armor" is an uncountable noun. So one could fix this sentence by breaking it up into two clauses (e.g. ...
4
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2answers
306 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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9answers
56k views

“A few” vs. “few”

I have few friends. I have a few friends. I thought "few" means just one, two or even none. "A few" typically means more than two. However it seems to me some people say "few" when they ...
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2answers
371 views

“I am a legend” vs. “I am legend”

Which sentence makes sense, the first or the second? I am      legend. I am  a  legend.
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2answers
157 views

How multiple quantifiers in a sentence are interpreted

Someone sleeps everyday. Does this mean that there is someone who sleeps everyday or that everyday someone sleeps?
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55 views

The best time to go out for (a) dinner [duplicate]

I'm not sure why in some situations articles are not going before a noun. E.g. I found this sentence: The best time to go out for dinner. Why is not here a dinner? This link says that we don't ...
0
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2answers
21k views

What are the grammatical rules for use of “these”, “those”, and “them”?

I am unclear of the use of [these|those] objects. I am unsure when to use [these|those|them]. Please someone help me tell me which is correct in the previous sentences. This is not a dupe of ...
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4answers
867 views

“Most” vs. “most of”

During most of history, humans were too busy to think about thought. Why is "most of history" correct in the above sentence? I could understand the difference between "Most of the people" and ...
3
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1answer
264 views

“All the good people” vs. “all of the good people”

I've heard both of these before. All the good people All of the good people Are they both correct?
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2answers
2k views

Grammar questions on the usage of “some” and “some of the” [closed]

I am correcting a short journal writes up from my student, who is from Korea and notice that I am so lacking of grammar knowledge in explaining to her why it is wrong in her sentence. Below is one ...
6
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3answers
3k views

Difference between 'all' and 'all the'

I came across people using all the in sentences instead of all. Select the type of user to view all the users of that type. All the users of the selected role are displayed. I usually strike ...
0
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0answers
74 views

When to put “of” after “all”? [duplicate]

What’s the difference between all and all of? When should one use of following all to make all of, and when should one drop the of and just use all all by itself? For example, in this sentence: ...
3
votes
1answer
905 views

“Minutes later” vs. “a few minutes later”

Can I say this: I forgot about it minutes later. Or do I have to say it this way instead: I forgot about it a few minutes later.
0
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1answer
662 views

“A person” versus “some person”

What is the difference between: There is a person in the room. There is some person in the room.
11
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8answers
37k views

Do “in future” and “in the future” imply different meanings?

Do in future and in the future imply different meanings? If so, using which one is grammatically correct?
0
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1answer
867 views

Should I use “a” or “an” before nouns starting with W [duplicate]

I have seen people saying "I am an Web developer", but by googling it, we can see that "A web developer" is much more common, and probably the right way. What is the rule here, since the W from "Web" ...