Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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Why is this sentence incorrect? [closed]

In my understanding, determiners are categorized into three subgroups: predeterminers, central determiners and postdeterminers. Articles (a, an, the) and possessive determiners are identified as ...
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54 views

Incorrect gerund to simple past conversion?

I'm a non-native speaker of English, so this might or might not be something very basic. Nonetheless, it's baffling me and I'd love some help. A friend of mine wrote this sentence in a story for ...
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124 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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2answers
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Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
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2answers
122 views

How to analyze lightly varying senses of adjective *very*

Use of very as an adjective is (in my experience) most frequently attested in phrases like ...the very person I was looking for. To use adjective very with the indefinite article sounds quite ...
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1answer
32 views

Determiner vs. Determinative

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, Huddleston and Pullum use the term "determinative" for the lexical category of words like the, etc. And they use "determiner" for the grammatical ...
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How multiple quantifiers in a sentence are interpreted

Someone sleeps everyday. Does this mean that there is someone who sleeps everyday or that everyday someone sleeps?
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29 views

What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?

Consider the phrase "I'm doing this for a bit different reason." The grouping here is "((a bit) different) reason" and not "a ((bit different) reason)", so the noun "reason" lacks an article. Does ...
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59 views

Determiners and Plurality in literature [duplicate]

Many times we come across examples like these :- Hobbits are an unobtrusive but very ancient people... For they are a little people, smaller than Dwarves... ~ From The Fellowship of the ...
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29 views

Is the use of “this” correct in “There is this blog, but I don't remember its name”?

What I write should mean the following: "There is this blog, but I don't remember its name." So I thought I have to write it this way to achieve the meaning in a short way: "This blog." But is ...
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7k views

“An other” vs “another”

I just edited this answer on unix.sx. The original sentence was But it won't transform it to an other format. I changed this to But it won't transform it to another format. The second form ...
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58 views

Using a determiner before a proper noun

This is a two-part question. Part one: My book of Dante's is entitled “The Divine Comedy,” published by Everyman’s Library. Wikipedia calls it “Divine Comedy” ...
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637 views

Is “How and why child is become criminal” proper English?

My friend is writing a paper for his Criminal Justice class and has asked me to take a look the the rough draft and point out any grammatical errors that I can spot. The first thing that jumped at ...
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23 views

“what” as a determiner

I am composing a sentence describing results of an experiment: we find [results] beyond what can be expected from [theory] I am not sure this is a proper use of "what". Does my sentence needs ...
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2answers
50 views

How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
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4answers
122 views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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1answer
380 views

Possessive pronouns vs possessive determiners

If my understanding is correct, the possessive personal pronouns (which are mine, thine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs) are used in place of nouns, whereas the possessive determiners (which ...
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187 views

Doesn't “Thanks very much.” sound weird? [closed]

Cambridge's English Vocabulary in Use, Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate, gives, as a common way of thanking people, “Thanks (very much).” (third edition, unit 64, page 134, heading C: Thanks and ...
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9answers
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“A few” vs. “few”

I have few friends. I have a few friends. I thought "few" means just one, two or even none. "A few" typically means more than two. However it seems to me some people say "few" when they ...
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30 views

“Which/what is your bike?” [duplicate]

— Which/what is your bike? — The blue bike. Is it possible to choose what instead of which, in your opinion?
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1answer
173 views

“Do you like my present” vs. “do you like your present”

When my daughter received the present I bought to her, I asked her: Do you like my present? Is this correct? Or I should say: Do you like your present?
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1answer
401 views

“Any vs. ”any other“ and ”every“ vs. ”every other"

Can you please clarify what difference in meanings exists between the sentences in the following two pairs: Tom is taller than any boy present in the class. Tom is taller than any other ...
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2answers
121 views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
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“Many people” vs. “much people” — which one should be used?

There's so many people in here! There's so much people here! Which one should be used, and why?
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1k views

Is the phrase “Like many another” correct in standard English?

I've come across "like many another" in a GMAT question. Its use is similar to "Like many other" e.g. "Like many another in his class, John is thirteen years old." It has 1M hits in google (compare ...
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Are there any simple rules for choosing the definite vs. indefinite (vs. none) article?

I can’t for the life of me figure out where to use a and where to use the — and where there is no article at all. Is there a simple rule of thumb to memorize? The standard rule you always hear: ...
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Is there a clear delineation between the usages of 'this' and 'that' in American English?

One of my linguistics professors speaks English as a second language, and remarked that she never knows which of the two is appropriate. Given a list of examples, all native speakers in the classroom ...
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773 views

“At the time” versus “at that time”

If I want to say that during the accident there were no passengers, how do I phrase it? There were no passengers at the time. There were no passengers at that time.
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Use of determiners as adjectives

In a grammar book that I'm reading, an adjective is defined as: A word that modifies a noun or a pronoun. (To modify is to limit or point out or describe: that book; another chance; the blue ...
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“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
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52 views

known as (a, the) - which article to pick?

A quote from the Economist: Part of this naturalistic approach is that the transistors in his systems often operate in what is known technically as the “sub-threshold domain”. May we use a ...
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2answers
159 views

Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?

I'm not very English literate, but I am annoyed by the use of "that" during the CrossFit games. Announcers, coaches, and athletes all said "that" more times than I can count. Move that bar. Use ...
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1answer
132 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
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“… things like this.” vs. “… things like that.”

Yesterday on talk radio an interviewee speaking about Sudanese Northerner's being forced into the mountains and away from their farmlands by the Sudanese Army said the result was: The men would ...
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283 views

“My latest five novels” or “my five latest novels”?

Is it okay to say "my latest five novels" when I want to express "five of my latest novels"? As far as I know, "five" is a postdeterminer, so it precedes an adjective (except for ...
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2answers
322 views

Which is correct, “in the past one hundred years” or “in the past hundred years”? [closed]

We say "in a few years" but "in the past/last few years". Then how can we express " the period of 100 years leading up to now"? Which is correct, "the last/past one hundred years" or "the last/past ...
2
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1answer
299 views

Predicate inner components in sentence (object without determiner)

I'm working on a computer program that might output the following sentence: Analyst Mark Mahaney upgraded rating on Apple to Buy Is that sentence valid in English? (That is, nothing betwen the ...
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“Which” vs. “what” — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other?

Most of the time one or the other feels better, but every so often, "which" vs. "what" trips me up. So, what's the exact difference and when should you use one or the other?
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994 views

The use of any with plural/singular words

I always thought with "any" I should use the plural, but on the internet I can find both: It can be found in any book. It can be found in any books Do you have any books? It can be said in any ...
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Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?

This weekend, I took my family to Arby's to eat. My wife ordered us all some food, and filled the cups with some ice and some soda, then I got some sauce for my sandwich as well as some sauces for ...
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“That” vs “It” as Anaphoric Determiners

What are the specific uses and differences of "it" and "that" in anaphoric reference? Sometimes they can be used interchangeably and sometimes they can't. I am teaching back referencing as a ...
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140 views

Is the quantifier a modifier or is it modified, in semantic respect?

"You've met Malfoy before?" Harry explained about their meeting in Diagon Alley. "I've heard of his family," said Ron darkly. "They were some of the first to come back to our side ...
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Help sheet for determiners and prepositions [closed]

I'm trying to produce a simple help sheet for foriegn speakers on English determiners and prepositions. Specifically, a basic description of when to use each type of determiner, and then the list of ...
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US English - need for determiners (a/an) in each item of a list (already parallel)

I have been all over every grammar site I can find (including this one) and cannot find a definitive answer. I am looking for a rule that says in a list of singular nouns, each noun must have its own ...
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1answer
121 views

Can we call 'ever' as a specifier?

He does not like planes. She never eats meal. (English Syntax and Argumentation, Bas Aarts) Aarts calls the negatives, not and never, as specifiers. ‘Ever’ in the example below seems to take ...
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Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
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I don't know which boy?

Is it correct to say: I don't know which boy you meet. For me which here makes sense but grammatically I think there is something wrong by using which to refer to the boy.
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“The applicability of the algorithm to uniform filter bank” or “to the uniform filter bank”?

I have this sentence: We would like to prove the applicability of the algorithm to uniform filter bank. I am not sure about the before uniform filter bank. To give the context for the sentence, ...
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Can you use “many, many” in this way?

Suppose I want to use the phrase "many, many" to compound the "maniness" of the thing I'm describing. There are many, many people. The people (of which there are many, many) The first one ...
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Need explanation about demonstrative determiner

Does the demonstratives refer to the next word or previously mentioned statement? The medieval center is Prague Castle and St. Vitus Cathedral. An evening view of these illuminated landmarks is ...