Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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Difference between 'all' and 'all the'

I came across people using all the in sentences instead of all. Select the type of user to view all the users of that type. All the users of the selected role are displayed. I usually strike ...
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0answers
21 views

Improper use of words with Subjective Pronouns

I read a quote as below: "You is kind. You is smart. You is important." (Kathryn Stockett) Clearly using "is" is not grammatically correct for "You" I have heard another sentence in which it seems ...
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1answer
102 views

Non-use of Determiners

I have reviewed several related posts here but am still quite confused with the use of determiners. Say, in this sentence - "They reviewed the forms again to ensure completeness and accuracy." What ...
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1answer
110 views

Is “many a person” singular or plural? [duplicate]

I'm writing a paper and I am not sure how to word this sentence. Which is the correct sentence: I am able to avoid a pitfall into which many a student has fallen. I am able to avoid a pitfall ...
3
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2answers
92 views

'A / One / At least one student entered the room.' Are these the same? (truth-conditionally)

I just wonder if the two following sentences are truth-conditionally the same. Sentence 1 essentially means there existed a student who entered the room, and this situation includes two, three or more ...
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“A person” versus “some person”

What is the difference between: There is a person in the room. There is some person in the room.
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171 views

a [box [of apples] ] vs [a box] [of apples]

The standard linguistic analysis of the NP a box of apples is that we have a determiner (a) which acts on (modifies?) box of apples. (For an example of standard analysis, see e.g. Fig. 6 here). ...
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0answers
33 views

What are the determiners 'this/these/that/those' called when they are not demonstrative?

Consider the sentences That car, which has been on the supermarket parking lot for a week now, do you have any idea who it belongs to? where the car can actually be seen at a distance, and ...
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6answers
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A battery of tests is/are

This is from a recent article: He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery of tests was conducted. Now shouldn't it be He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery ...
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9answers
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Equivalent of “both” when referring to three or more items?

What would be the correct word to use when referring to three or more items, in the same manner as the word both? For example, using two words, with the word both: "There are several ...
0
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0answers
19 views

“The” as in “The withdrawal of the production of the product”

When using the determiner "the", I sometimes notice that when writing a phrase like "The withdrawal of the production of the product," it is more natural (in my opinion) to write "The withdrawal of ...
43
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8answers
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Are there any simple rules for choosing the definite vs. indefinite (vs. none) article?

I can’t for the life of me figure out where to use a and where to use the — and where there is no article at all. Is there a simple rule of thumb to memorize? The standard rule you always hear: ...
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2answers
274 views

Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?

In Chapter 4 of the book A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar, written by Rodney Huddleston of the University of Queensland and Geoffrey K. Pullum of the University of Edinburgh and published ...
6
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1answer
93 views

You're both of us' child / You're both of our child / You're both of ours child - Why are these all ungrammatical?

There was an interesting question on our sister site ELL: Is “Both of our child” valid? Suppose a kid asks their mother "Am I your child or Dad's child?": Why are the alternatives in the title ...
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2answers
102 views

indefinite article plus proper name in organizational (i.e. business or bureaucracy) contexts

The use of the indefinite article with a proper name occurs often in business or organizational speech-contexts: We're lucky to have a Bill Jones to get the job done. The article plus proper ...
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1answer
126 views

“whatever” as pure determiner?

My dictionaries and references define, and I've always thought of, one of the functions of the word whatever as a "relative determiner." In a sentence like, "I will help you in whatever way is ...
5
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1answer
157 views

Can the word “group” function as a determiner?

Here are some example sentences that show my thought process: Some cats are playing with each other. Okay, it seems obvious that "some" is a determiner. A number of cats are playing with ...
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4answers
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“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
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3answers
14k views

“At the time” versus “at that time”

If I want to say that during the accident there were no passengers, how do I phrase it? There were no passengers at the time. There were no passengers at that time.
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0answers
35 views

“Both” when an action requires two parties

I sometimes come across sentences like this one: Both sides in the refugee dispute have been making seemingly contradictory claims about the age and gender of the Syrian refugees — portraying them ...
3
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1answer
303 views

“each of us” vs “both of us”

A guy said that he will give them 20 bucks if they wash his car. So they asked him that question to make it clear. But I am confused by their reply: Is that 20 bucks for each of us or both of us? ...
0
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2answers
190 views

“driving across the state” or “driving across state”?

Is it "driving across state" like "driving across town", or "driving across THE state", like "driving across the country"?
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4answers
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Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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4answers
53 views

Omitting the determiner: “a peach cake or (a) cheesecake”

Can I omit the second determiner "a" in this sentence? Which would you like, a peach cake or a cheesecake? Is the determiner of cheesecake necessary to make the intended meaning of either a ...
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1answer
63 views

What are the differences between “so” and “so much”?

When I received your email, I was so much glad. Do you think that, in above sentence, the use of "so much" is correct? What should I use? If I use, "so" instead of "so much", does the meaning of ...
3
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1answer
163 views

When may adjectives precede determiners? (E.g. too difficult a task)

The expression too difficult a task sounds a little pompous, but it doesn't sound ungrammatical. According to my folk-beliefs about English grammar, determiners precede adjectives. However, the ...
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3answers
155 views

“He was neither seer nor prophet” How would you explain the absence of an article?

Here's a fragment from Jack London's Star Rover: Wordsworth knew. He was neither seer nor prophet, but just ordinary man like you or any man. What he knew you know, any man knows. But he most ...
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5answers
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Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?

I am trying to explain to a colleague why the sentence: Additional nine features were added to the dig is incorrect. I have said you can say "An additional nine features...", "Nine additional ...
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1answer
170 views

What/Which train are you going on/by? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following interrogative structures? What train are you going on/by? Which train are you going on/by? And which of the prepositions, given at the end ...
2
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3answers
348 views

“you,” “your” or “yours” in this sentence? [duplicate]

I just received an email that had the following sentence, We have plenty of magic that will pique your and your customers' interest. Aside from the obvious errors, do we use "you" "yours" or ...
0
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1answer
54 views

What is the determiner in “the little girl's pink dress”?

The little girl's pink dress. Is the determiner "the", or is it "the little girl's"?
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2answers
33 views

“Person with a trauma” or “person with trauma”

In academic writing, I frequently run across texts where the determiner is dropped when a person is described as having a medical condition or having suffered an injury. Moreover, a singular noun is ...
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1answer
74 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
2
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3answers
351 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
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2answers
50 views

Little boy or That little boy

I recently saw this sentence: Best wishes for little kid which I think she should put a determiner or an article before little kid, E.g: Best wishes for my little kid or Best wishes for that little ...
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2answers
817 views

her: a determiner or a pronoun?

Her has two forms: Possessive form of 'she': This is her pen; She is her mother Object form of 'she': Give it to her; I know her For simplicity, please let me refer to the first form of her as ...
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2answers
459 views

My father had no much money / My father did not have much money [closed]

Can both sentences be acceptable? (1) My father did not have much money. (2) My father had no much money. If one of them is incorrect, what is the grammatical reason why?
3
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2answers
238 views

'The average person' or 'an average person'?

Which one is correct, or are both of them fine? "It would take the average person 10 days to read this novel" Or "It would take an average person 10 days to read this novel"
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0answers
101 views

Question on use of either/either the and both/both the

As a second-language learner of English, I have been encountering many English expressions that I cannot grasp intuitively, but could find the most sound answers to some of my questions. However, I ...
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0answers
19 views

Pronunciation of a (article) /ə/ vs /eɪ/ [duplicate]

When to use the weak form /ə/ and when to use the weak form /eɪ/ of the article "a"? I figure if I would emphasize anything I wouldn't emphasize an article like "a", but rather, the noun (phrase) ...
3
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2answers
636 views

In town but not in the town

We say "the best restaurant in town" but not "what is the best restaurant in the town". Why is this?
2
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4answers
382 views

There is not evidence vs. There is not any evidence vs. There is no evidence vs. There isn't evidence

A Washington Post article titled "Justice Dept. concludes that no, Michael Brown’s hands probably were not up" has this: According to the report, here is what investigators believe most likely ...
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7answers
14k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
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3answers
1k views

When to use “this” or “that”?

It is 10 cm on the map. That is 100 km in real terms. I am proofreading and it seems odd that the writer always uses that in these cases. I would have said this. Who is right and who is ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...
0
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2answers
58 views

“A”/“an” in front of a noun

Which sentence is grammatically correct or preferred? Emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. An emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. My kids and even one of their teachers ...
16
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7answers
3k views

Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?
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2answers
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“To this end” or “To that end”

Is there a usage note for choosing between these two phrases? Nothing in Garner. And I've seen it both ways. Example: To that end, we propose the following compromise. or To this end, we ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
204 views

US English - need for determiners (a/an) in each item of a list (already parallel)

I have been all over every grammar site I can find (including this one) and cannot find a definitive answer. I am looking for a rule that says in a list of singular nouns, each noun must have its own ...