Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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What is the determiner in “the little girl's pink dress”?

The little girl's pink dress. Is the determiner "the", or is it "the little girl's"?
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“Person with a trauma” or “person with trauma”

In academic writing, I frequently run across texts where the determiner is dropped when a person is described as having a medical condition or having suffered an injury. Moreover, a singular noun is ...
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103 views

Question on use of either/either the and both/both the

As a second-language learner of English, I have been encountering many English expressions that I cannot grasp intuitively, but could find the most sound answers to some of my questions. However, I ...
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Pronunciation of a (article) /ə/ vs /eɪ/ [duplicate]

When to use the weak form /ə/ and when to use the weak form /eɪ/ of the article "a"? I figure if I would emphasize anything I wouldn't emphasize an article like "a", but rather, the noun (phrase) ...
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55 views

The best time to go out for (a) dinner [duplicate]

I'm not sure why in some situations articles are not going before a noun. E.g. I found this sentence: The best time to go out for dinner. Why is not here a dinner? This link says that we don't ...
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158 views

When to put “of” after “all”? [duplicate]

What’s the difference between all and all of? When should one use of following all to make all of, and when should one drop the of and just use all all by itself? For example, in this sentence: ...
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Should “two-week” be hyphenated in “a two-week all-expense-paid trip”? [duplicate]

Which is correct — "a two-week all-expense-paid trip" or "a two week all-expense-paid trip"?
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326 views

Incorrect gerund to simple past conversion?

I'm a non-native speaker of English, so this might or might not be something very basic. Nonetheless, it's baffling me and I'd love some help. A friend of mine wrote this sentence in a story for ...
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846 views

How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
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3answers
856 views

“You didn't build that” — but what was Obama referring to by “that”?

During the opening night of the Republican National Convention, many speakers took to the podium and took advantage of a phrase spoken by President Obama that some are calling a grammatical error. In ...
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195 views

What/Which train are you going on/by? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following interrogative structures? What train are you going on/by? Which train are you going on/by? And which of the prepositions, given at the end ...
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3k views

Some other or another

I wonder if "some other" means exactly the same as "another" in the following sentences. Is there any difference between them? There must be another explanation. There must be some other ...
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Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
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Should I use “a” or “an” before nouns starting with W [duplicate]

I have seen people saying "I am an Web developer", but by googling it, we can see that "A web developer" is much more common, and probably the right way. What is the rule here, since the W from "Web" ...
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Which is correct, “in the past one hundred years” or “in the past hundred years”? [closed]

We say "in a few years" but "in the past/last few years". Then how can we express " the period of 100 years leading up to now"? Which is correct, "the last/past one hundred years" or "the last/past ...