Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

9
votes
2answers
267 views

Can you use “many, many” in this way?

Suppose I want to use the phrase "many, many" to compound the "maniness" of the thing I'm describing. There are many, many people. The people (of which there are many, many) The first one ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Need explanation about demonstrative determiner

Does the demonstratives refer to the next word or previously mentioned statement? The medieval center is Prague Castle and St. Vitus Cathedral. An evening view of these illuminated landmarks is ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Some other or another

I wonder if "some other" means exactly the same as "another" in the following sentences. Is there any difference between them? There must be another explanation. There must be some other ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Is this construct correct? “This one something…”

After criticizing some whole category of blog posts as fake news, biased or undercover advertising, I was about to add: That being said, I must admit that this one article is quite interesting. ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

“A different one” when we have 3 objects - other/another? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count? Here is the context (found in a forum for learners of English) WAITRESS: Do you ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

“These stuff” vs. “this stuff” [closed]

I wrote “I know all these stuff; I don’t have to go over them again” in my writing-exam paper and the teacher corrected it to read, “I know all this stuff; I don’t have to go over it again.” The ...
6
votes
3answers
8k views

Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count?

Merriam-Webster says about another the following: being one more in addition to one or more of the same kind —http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/another However, I come across such ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is the use of “what” over “which” correct in this sentence?

I was filling out an application form, when I had noticed this sentence: If bilingual, please provide in what languages. If I was writing this, I'd form it as which languages, instead of what ...
3
votes
1answer
385 views

Is “the many” grammatical? [closed]

The homework is as following As it stands, our rule allows just one determiner in an NP. NP → (D) (AdjP+) N (PP+) (CP) (PP+) How can we revise this rule to account for the following data: ...
3
votes
2answers
16k views

“They all are fine” vs. “they are all fine” [closed]

The situation is that someone asks me how my family are; I then want to answer that they all are fine. I want to know whether the sentences "They all are fine." and "They are all fine." have the ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Correct usage of determiners and prepositions

I am confused between two sentences: The houses in the cities are more beautiful than that of villages. The houses in the cities are more beautiful than those in the villages. Which one ...
4
votes
3answers
830 views

When is it appropriate to use 'the' instead of a possessive determiner?

I was with someone today and we were talking about a woman, and she said: "Wow, the husband must be so proud." I was confused as to which was correct or more appropriate as opposed to: "Wow, ...
9
votes
2answers
584 views

Can I precede a noun with more than one determiner?

Is there a rule that a noun would take only one determiner at most? For example, according to “Determiner” at EnglishLanguageGuide.com, both both and the are determiners. Can I write an expression ...
-1
votes
3answers
854 views

“You didn't build that” — but what was Obama referring to by “that”?

During the opening night of the Republican National Convention, many speakers took to the podium and took advantage of a phrase spoken by President Obama that some are calling a grammatical error. In ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

“Any English I have learned” vs. “All the English I have learned” [closed]

Is it correct to say: Any English I have learned has been from movies and the Internet or is it better: All the English I have learned has been from movies and the internet?
17
votes
4answers
39k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
4
votes
3answers
9k views

“… things like this.” vs. “… things like that.”

Yesterday on talk radio an interviewee speaking about Sudanese Northerner's being forced into the mountains and away from their farmlands by the Sudanese Army said the result was: The men would ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a clear delineation between the usages of 'this' and 'that' in American English?

One of my linguistics professors speaks English as a second language, and remarked that she never knows which of the two is appropriate. Given a list of examples, all native speakers in the classroom ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Central determiners “some” and “any” used with singular count nouns

I couldn't comment on Irene's post here, so I decided to make a topic. I'd like to know whether this phrase: "I can give you any book that's left" is grammatically right since "some" and "any" are ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

“Both which” or “both of which”

"This can be done using the technique of Peters, and using the technique of Matthews, both which involve mathematics" Having searched both which and both of which in Google, it appears both of which ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Difference between “a few minutes” and “few minutes” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A few” vs. “few” What is the difference between "a few minutes" and "few minutes"? For instance, how do these statements differ? She has ...
4
votes
2answers
19k views

“For both X and Y” or “both for X and Y” or …?

Which of these forms is correct? X will be used both for Y and Z X will be used for both Y and Z X will be used both for Y and for Z Other...
1
vote
2answers
180 views

Is “for all who” grammatical? [closed]

The context is: The blog for all who want to learn German. I feel like this is not correct, but the only alternative I can think of is: The blog for all those who want to learn German. ...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

“Any” with countable nouns in questions

I have seen "is “any” also used with plurals", which explains that any can be used with singular, plural, and uncountable nouns. However, I want to ask specifically about questions. ...
2
votes
1answer
203 views

Parse tree of “several more successful books”

Let us consider the following sentence: After that first attempt, she wrote several more successful books. Does this mean she wrote several additional books that were also successful? Or that ...
3
votes
3answers
307 views

“Which” or “where”?

A question of mine on another SE site was corrected from: I am trying to determine where on Earth has the lowest gravity. To: I am trying to determine which on Earth's surface has the lowest ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Use of determiners as adjectives

In a grammar book that I'm reading, an adjective is defined as: A word that modifies a noun or a pronoun. (To modify is to limit or point out or describe: that book; another chance; the blue ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Grammar questions on the usage of “some” and “some of the” [closed]

I am correcting a short journal writes up from my student, who is from Korea and notice that I am so lacking of grammar knowledge in explaining to her why it is wrong in her sentence. Below is one ...
5
votes
2answers
787 views

Can anyone explain the use of determiners in this passage?

Can someone explain the use of determiners (words like some or the) for the word beans in the following dialogue: Aki: Lisa, here're some beans. Lisa: Why are you giving me beans? Aki: ...
17
votes
4answers
39k views

“An other” vs “another”

I just edited this answer on unix.sx. The original sentence was But it won't transform it to an other format. I changed this to But it won't transform it to another format. The second form ...
0
votes
1answer
481 views

“User's expertise” or “user expertise”?

What is the correct form when referring to the expertise of a user (e.g. in programming, writing)? user's expertise user expertise
5
votes
3answers
14k views

“At the time” versus “at that time”

If I want to say that during the accident there were no passengers, how do I phrase it? There were no passengers at the time. There were no passengers at that time.
11
votes
7answers
14k views

Difference between “without” and “with no”

What is the difference between the usage of without and with no? For example, without sound and with no sound.
3
votes
3answers
30k views

“At this time” vs “At that time”

Is it acceptable to use "at this time" when referring to a specific point in time in the past? While in the process of telling a story, for example, that happens completely in the past? To me it just ...
11
votes
5answers
321 views

What is the radical difference between ‘this’ and ‘a’ when telling a story?

The following quotation is a line from Ron to Harry after the first stage of the Triwizard Tournament. (p359, Harry Potter 4, US edition) “You were the best, you know, no competition. Cedric did ...
14
votes
1answer
18k views

What are the rules about using 'half of' with plural nouns?

Here are some sentences with 'half of' and plural nouns that I consider to be well-formed: Half of all films are a waste of celluloid. Half of users surveyed said they preferred the old product. ...
2
votes
3answers
351 views

What should I use between “triple” vs. “all”?

If I have 2 pens and I want to say all of them are green, I can say "Both of them are green" but if I have 3 pens should I use "Triple of them are green" or "All of them are green"?
30
votes
9answers
32k views

Equivalent of “both” when referring to three or more items?

What would be the correct word to use when referring to three or more items, in the same manner as the word both? For example, using two words, with the word both: "There are several ...
5
votes
2answers
589 views

What are “a” and “certain” adding in meaning to the phrase “a certain Mr. Ripley”?

Consider the following sentences: I had my identity stolen by Mr. Ripley. and I had my identity stolen by a Mr. Ripley. and I had my identity stolen by a certain Mr. Ripley. In what ...
1
vote
2answers
28k views

What are the grammatical rules for use of “these”, “those”, and “them”?

I am unclear of the use of [these|those] objects. I am unsure when to use [these|those|them]. Please someone help me tell me which is correct in the previous sentences. This is not a dupe of ...
7
votes
1answer
924 views

Is “any” also used with plurals?

I found on a research paper the following statement: Is any particular images satisfying the requirements ? I thought any can only be used with singular terms. So I was surprised when I've seen ...
3
votes
1answer
324 views

“All the good people” vs. “all of the good people”

I've heard both of these before. All the good people All of the good people Are they both correct?
7
votes
3answers
22k views

What's the difference between “another” and “other”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My another account” vs. “my other account” Sometime it's vague for me when to use other vs another. For example, You need to buy other ...
1
vote
3answers
565 views

Why not concatenate two frequently used words into a new one?

I will probably get a lot of flak about this, but why not combine the often used together words "with the" into "withe" which is pronounced similarly, and it much shorter and easier to write? I am ...
1
vote
3answers
439 views

“Much feces” vs. “many feces”

I want to know which word I should use in the following sentence: How many/much feces does a human produce in one year? I found that both versions exist on the Internet. Any help would be ...
31
votes
6answers
108k views

Which is correct, “neither is” or “neither are”?

Bob: "Can I set the font color? Can I customize the text?" Frank: "Neither of these options is available. Sorry!" Is "neither is" always correct or should one use "neither are" in some cases and ...
7
votes
4answers
53k views

“Many people” vs. “much people” — which one should be used?

There's so many people in here! There's so much people here! Which one should be used, and why?
2
votes
2answers
178 views

Is it correct to say “which is Jay”?

I've been watching the movie "King Arthur", and I heard Arthur asking "Which is X?" Is it correct to say "Which is Jay?" instead of "Who is Jay?"?
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Missing articles?

Aren't some articles missing in the following sentence? ... when traditional pattern of landscape became established. Or is it something else that is wrong with this sentence? Context.